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I've seen a report somewhere about a study they did on horses. They totally sense major weather changes. And I think anyone that has animals and lives in california (I do) can attest to the fact that they totally get freaked out before an earthquake hits.

I'm a believer!!!

-Melissa (
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Our late beastie (a siamese cat) used to hunker down and look up at the corners of the walls and ceilings before a quake or tremor. Whenever she did that we'd all jump. It was a bombproof predictor but only gave us time to get under the table, not much more warning than that. And when you're asleep in bed at 5 am, trying to watch the cat doesn't happen... that was life when the Northridge quake hit us.

I wish we had those spidey-senses.... maybe we do, just buried way down deep.
 

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This is amazing, really. I once had a cat that woke me & my ex up right before an earthquake that hit around 5am. We couldn't figure out what she wanted, but she was trying to tell us something was coming.

Maybe, at one point in time, humans had this capability too? It seems like we've removed ourselves from nature so much that perhaps this is something we've lost...?
 

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I saw Jack Hanna on Anderson Cooper the other night. He is annoying but does know animals. He had a few interesting quick statements to make about animal behavior.

Let's see. Elephants feel vibrations very sensitively with their feet. For hundreds of miles! Surely they felt the vibrations of untold gallons of water coming towards the coast. They put up their trunks and trumpet to signal danger to their tribe. Other animals see this and also scoot the danger zone. They are all interconnected and leave en mass.

Out in the water, fish and esp dolphins, have differing degrees of sonar. They sense the unusual danger and start to move out of the way. Birds preying on the fish, see them moving in unusual patterns and get freaked and head inland to safety. Migratory birds also have a highly developed magnetic sense which might come into play as well. The land animals see the birds coming in and this confirms the danger and reasons for flight.

He also said how he is in tune with animals when he is out camping. By the sounds squirrels make, for ex, he can sense a predator nearby, be it a bear or puma. All humans once were this connected and inter-dependent on nature (animals and other signals) but we "civilised people" have lost it.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by mamadawg

Maybe, at one point in time, humans had this capability too? It seems like we've removed ourselves from nature so much that perhaps this is something we've lost...?
I think so too...
 

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On an interesting note, on a small island near the earthquake's epicenter there was virtually no human loss because the population had an oral history that taught them to get to higher ground if they felt an earthquake. Sadly, those in Sri Lanka and India, didn't even feel the earthquakes warning and those closer probably didn't have the communal history that would tie them to lessons learned in the distant past.

This is all so hard to fathom


Kathy
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Indigomama
A lot of the small islands that are all indigenous tribes also had virtually no loss.

Maybe it's not so much that animals have a sense but we've lost ours??

i think this could definately be a possibility as well!
 

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many folks in rural lands know to trust their animals around them.
Humans never have had the intense sense of smell that dog have had.
 

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I grew up on a thoroughbred breeding farm, and horses definately know when a storm is coming. They will all start talking to each other, and running around in their stalls and being restless. The ones in the fields would raise thier noses high and sniff the air. They never acted this way for just rain, just when storms were coming.

I have several birdfeeders in my backyard. I notice a huge increase in activity at them before a cold front comes. Right now, the feeders are just about empty (it's in the 60s in January weird!) but I will bet that as a cold front approaches, or when its stupposed to snow the next day, the feeders will be busy from morning until evening.
 
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