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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, what do you use to freeze stuff? In my quest to get away from plastic, I've been using big mason jars for my bone broths, soups, etc. Unfortunately, I have had a number of my jars break in the freezer (mason jars are not meant to be frozen)- even with plenty of head room for expansion in the jar.<br><br>
So who has the solution for me? I'm making some bone broth as we speak, so I need help quickly!!!!!!!!!!<br><br>
TIA
 

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I commend you on your attempt to ditch the plastic. But I have to throw this out there. Plastic ziplock bags are cheap and reusable (just wash and dry them) and are convenient for freezing broth. To thaw just run some water over them.
 

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I think the concern is plastics leaching chemicals into food, not just the environmental aspect of using disposables.
 

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I second the pyrex.<br><br>
Kmart has an offbrand that is less expensive than the pyrex brand. I think it's called "anchor" and has the resealable tops.<br><br>
My dh freezes broth in ice cube trays and then puts them in a ziploc baggie.<br>
I never have the patience. Again you are running into the plastic thing. I'm sure you could find some old metal cube trays for future use (or are all those aluminum?<br><br>
I'm still trying new ways of freezing sans plastic. We have a very small freezer so the only thing that really works right now for us is zip baggies. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug">
 

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to prevent breakage, i have found that i should leave space, about 2", chill the jars full of liquid first, and then freeze in my regular freezer without lids. then i put them in the deep freezer without lids and put the lids on the next day.
 

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I use small, wide mouthed mason jars (I think they hold a cup and a half or a hair more). I fill them up to below the rungs or whatever you call the things that the lid screws into (thank you, pregnancy brain!), cool them completely in the fridge over night, and then freeze. If I use any mason jar bigger than that, they burst, but I do okay with the little ones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks everyone. I do have some of the 1.5c freezer safe masons- that's what I ended up using mostly for the stock. I also tried again with my 3+ cup regular mason and left a lot of head room, etc. We'll see if the biggie survives <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 

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If, after finishing the stock and cooling it (just needed if you take the fat off, I guess), you can reduce it down, and since you'll be boiling off much of the water (I like to reduce it to 25% of the original volume), there won't be as much expansion when it's frozen.
 

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I've had jars break too, but the contents are frozen solid and i'm wondering if i can still use it??? The jars cracked apart in a big line down the side, not into little pieces, but i wonder if there might be bits of glass in the soup?? What do you all think? I was considering melting off the outside layers and then eating the rest???<br><br>
Thanks!<br><br>
Sarahfina
 

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When freezing in glass I'm pretty sure that the jar needs to have straight sides and a non-tapering mouth. In a regualr quart mason jar the mouth tapers in. When the top freezes and the inside starts to expand there is no where for that pressure to go but "up" and the narrowing mouth causes pressure on the sloping glass areas.<br><br>
I always use wide mouth pint mason jars. I leave an inch or two of head space and freeze them uncovered. Once they are 100% froxen all the way through I put on a thin layer of water (prevents freezer burn), freeze, and then cap them.<br>
I've done this hundreds of time with not a single broken jar! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>tinuviel_k</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10722951"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">When freezing in glass I'm pretty sure that the jar needs to have straight sides and a non-tapering mouth. In a regualr quart mason jar the mouth tapers in. When the top freezes and the inside starts to expand there is no where for that pressure to go but "up" and the narrowing mouth causes pressure on the sloping glass areas.<br><br>
I always use wide mouth pint mason jars. I leave an inch or two of head space and freeze them uncovered. Once they are 100% froxen all the way through I put on a thin layer of water (prevents freezer burn), freeze, and then cap them.<br>
I've done this hundreds of time with not a single broken jar! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"></div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
This is what I do also and have never had a broken jar. We only use glass for storage...
 
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