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I've nursed my 11-month-old daughter on demand since birth. When I began, I had the idea that she would naturally nurse less and less frequently as she got older. The opposite is true--she still nurses several times a day. Usually at least every two hours, and sometimes a few times within a single hour! She continues to thrive physically and she's typically a happy baby. I chose to ap with the understanding that it would grow her into a secure child, but I have to wonder if her hyper-nursing tendencies point to insecurities? Because I thought that, physically, her need to nurse would be less by now. Any ideas?
 

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Eleven months old is still very young -- many babies nurse beyond 2 or 3 years -- and frequency varies from child to child. My dd's pattern of nursing was similar at your dd's age and she is secure, happy and did not nurse every 2 hours forever. In fact once she was waling and running everywhere she often "forgot" to nurse but it was a wonderful way to soothe her or reconnect at the end of a busy day. You are doing a great job of meeting her needs and feel confident that by following her lead you will know what she needs.
 

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: My dd, currently NAK, is 29 mos & nurses quite often. The last few days, I kid you not, she has nursed about 20 times during the day - & she's not sick. Definitely different for each child.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Mandamama
I've nursed my 11-month-old daughter on demand since birth. When I began, I had the idea that she would naturally nurse less and less frequently as she got older. The opposite is true--she still nurses several times a day. Usually at least every two hours, and sometimes a few times within a single hour! She continues to thrive physically and she's typically a happy baby. I chose to ap with the understanding that it would grow her into a secure child, but I have to wonder if her hyper-nursing tendencies point to insecurities? Because I thought that, physically, her need to nurse would be less by now. Any ideas?
Before DD was born I was committed to CLW (child-led weaning). BUT, I figured that by the time she was two she would be nursing maybe once or twice a day and that she would give those up easily in the next couple months. That when she was 12 months she would be sleeping 12 hours at night and nursing the "normal" times--- awake, before nap, before 2nd nap, afternoon, eve and night.

I do not remember exactly when it was, but I had told someone in all honesty that DD nursed probably 10-14 times a day. This was sometime in her 2nd year. Then I decided, well, I'll go ahead and count them. I started in the morning and stopped counting around #22. DP wasn't even home from work yet
:

Fast forward. Now I have a very independent, socially poised 6 year old on my hands. We were in a car accident last December and the paramedics didn't believe she was not yet six--- she talked to them like an adult and gave all of her relevant information (birthday, phone number, etc...). She take several classes and has decided she would like to try full time school next year. And she doesn't nurse. Hasn't for quite a while in fact (we consider her to have weaned March 2 years ago).

Probably more info than you wanted, but I just want to reassure you--- you ARE doing the right thing. You are letting your child completely fill their needs while young, so they don't have to search to fill those baby needs as an adult.


I also want to mention... you haven't even got to the GOOD part yet. There is nothing like nursing someone who not only gives you hugs and kisses and milky grins as thanks, but can actually verbalize their love of nursing and their love of you for providing it.

Lastly--- her physical need to nurse. DD was getting 95-99% of her calories from bmilk at a year. While not every child nurses to that extent (though many do), there was certainly nothing unhealthy about it. She increased her solid intake very slowly until after she turned two (and I was pg w/DS). Then she started eating more solids and now, at six she might not have the diet I would hope for but it is healthier than most of her peers, and at least as varied.
 
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