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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i have been reading about vaccines and i have decided to wait until at least 2 years for Ethan to get any vaccines, if any at all, but yesterday a friend who is really puzzled at my position stated that "almost all babies get RSV". do they vaccinate for this now? this is the first time ive heard anything so "crazy".
 

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I think she's referring to the CDC claim that almost all children get <b>rotavirus</b>. She probably saw a RotaTeq ad in one of those parenting rags.
 

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Rotavirus:<br><a href="http://www.cdc.gov/nip/pr/pr_rotavirus_feb2006.htm" target="_blank">http://www.cdc.gov/nip/pr/pr_rotavirus_feb2006.htm</a><br><br>
By the way, there is currently a RSV vaccine in development.<br><br>
I stand corrected, the CDC claims that almost all children get RSV as well: <a href="http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/aip/research/rsv.html" target="_blank">http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/aip/research/rsv.html</a>
 

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The CDC states:<br><br><i>Nearly every child in the United States is infected with rotavirus by age five <b><span style="text-decoration:underline;">and most will develop gastroenteritis</span></b>, leading to a large number of physician visits</i><br><br>
***********<br>
In others words, <b>nearly every child in the U.S.</b> will get the "stomach flu" and be done with it. And maybe get it again at some point in time . . . and then be done with it.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>aisraeltax</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">"almost all babies get RSV". this is the first time ive heard anything so "crazy".</div>
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This got me thinking and wondering, would it be true that everyone "got RSV" and are now immune, right?<br>
If a living being does not become immune or build antibodies, then they die, right?<br><br>
Basically, I am saying that everyone has "gotten sick" and lived to talk about it.<br><br>
I have never yet found a virus that causes death in a human being. People who are sick and die, do so from dehydration and/or secondary infections, ie-bacteria.<br><br>
Obviously, I am not a PhD, so these are just my thoughts.
 

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I think most kids DO get RSV by the age of 2, it's just that in most of them it manifests as a common, harmless cold. Just in a few does it turn serious enough to be taken to the doctor (or hospital) to be diagnosed.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>CallMeMommy</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I think most kids DO get RSV by the age of 2, it's just that in most of them it manifests as a common, harmless cold. Just in a few does it turn serious enough to be taken to the doctor (or hospital) to be diagnosed.</div>
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This is correct.<br><br>
In most cases it's just flu-like illness or a bad cold. It can be devastating to kids with underlying lung problems, like severe asthma, or to very young babies or those especially vunlerable, most notably premature babies.<br><br>
My 2 yo had it earlier this winter and ended up in the ER with hypoxia. Turns out she had undiagnosed asthma. She's fine now but it was pretty scary.<br><br>
I'd certainly consider a vaccination if it were available and my child were at particular risk. Most healthy kids will do fine if and when they contract it, however.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>blessed</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Most healthy kids will do fine if and when they contract it</div>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/nod.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="nod"><br><br>
However, when an RSV vaccine does ultimately become licensed, it will most likely be <b>universally</b> recommended.
 

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I'm not seeing how an RSV vax could work. Natural infection doesn't produce immunity, so how's the vax going to do it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
i need to talk to my friend again, but she somehow linked rsv to her child developing asthma. there are other reasons i think the child has asthma (mom has it, lifestyle, etc.), but i need to get more info. b/c im just unclear of what she was actually saying (you know, when you talk to ppl who havent researched anything but just reiterate what doc's say).<br>
rach
 

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I think she was confused and meant that rotavirus, not RSV, most kids get? RSV and rotavirus are not the same thing.<br><br>
I think most kids probably do get rotavirus, but in the healthy it's probably just some mild stomach problems or something like that. And some children get really sick with it...the little boy downstairs, still nursing, got rotavirus a month or two ago and was hospitalized for dehydration because he was just so sick and wouldn't even nurse (just wanted to sleep). Yes he was very sick but after they hydrated him via an IV, he was fine and recovered with no problems.<br><br>
I think it would be a good vaccine for some (children in other countries basically who don't have access to clean IV's, etc), but not for all. I dont believe most children who are hospitalized for rotavirus in the US actually die from it, but in other countries they sure do, very sad. And ya it would be a better idea to clean up the water supply, provide clean medical equipment, etc in those countries but that isn't going to happen <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> So I hope the vax will help them. But I wouldn't get the vax for my kids. And it worries me they will push it as a universal vaccine because here in the US I think that will cause more harm than good.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>marilynmama</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I think she was confused and meant that rotavirus, not RSV, most kids get? RSV and rotavirus are not the same thing.</div>
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According to the CDC:<br><br><i>RSV infection is quite common; <b>virtually all children</b> in the United States have been infected with RSV by the age of 3 years</i><br><br><a href="http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/aip/research/rsv.html" target="_blank">http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/aip/research/rsv.html</a>
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Rainbow Brite</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Most kids will get rsv and will die from it, but only after the vax is added to the rec schedule.</div>
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Then what they'll do is include <b>worldwide</b> deaths and stick that figure on the VIS and hope no one notices the word "worldwide."<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> Yup, suddenly it will be the number one killer amongst children. Forget car seats, vaccines are the only safety feature you need to keep your kids alive till they are 5.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>LongIsland</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Then what they'll do is include <b>worldwide</b> deaths and stick that figure on the VIS and hope no one notices the word "worldwide."<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"></div>
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And then they'll say, "Before the indroduction of the vaccine in 2006, X many thousands of children contracted RSV each year, resulting in bla bla bla."<br>
And then they'll go on to add that now it's unheard of (think pertussis).<br><br>
And then, before too long they'll decide they need to add boosters when they realise it was just under-reporting in vaxed kids, and then eventually they'll come out with the recommendations for adults to get the vax to help with herd immunity when the boosters don't work.<br><br>
And then, many years from now, adults will be sitting around arguing about things like "Well, ever since I started getting my yearly RSV vax, I haven't had RSV, so I know it works!" countered by another's "Well, I've never had the shot, and I've never had RSV, so I think you're just seeing coincidence!"
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mamakay</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">and then eventually they'll come out with the recommendations for adults to get the vax to help with herd immunity when the boosters don't work.</div>
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You're not too far off mamakay!!!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"><br>
Take a look at this from last year: <a href="http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/503873" target="_blank">http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/503873</a><br><br><b>The link is not coming through, so I'll post a little bit:</b><br><br>
April 27, 2005 — Clinicians should have increased vigilance for respiratory syncytial virus <b>(RSV) infection in elderly and high-risk adults</b>, according to the results of a study published in the April 28 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.<br><br>
"RSV is an increasingly recognized cause of illness in adults," write Ann R. Falsey, MD, from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry in New York, and colleagues. "Data on the epidemiology and clinical effects in community-dwelling elderly persons and high-risk adults can help in <b>assessing the need for vaccine development."</b><br><br>
Although RSV infection generated fewer office visits than influenza in healthy elderly patients, the rate of use of health care services by high-risk adults was similar in both groups. In the hospitalized cohort, RSV infection and influenza A were associated with similar lengths of stay, rates of use of intensive care (15% vs 12%), and mortality (8% vs 7%).<br><br>
RSV infection was the cause of 10.6% of hospitalizations for pneumonia, 11.4% for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 5.4% for congestive heart failure, and 7.2% for asthma, based on the diagnostic codes of the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification at discharge.<br><br>
"RSV infection is an important illness in elderly and high-risk adults, with a disease burden similar to that of nonpandemic influenza A in a population in which the prevalence of vaccination for influenza is high," the authors write. <b>"An effective RSV vaccine may offer benefits for these adults.</b>"<br><br>
The National Institutes of Health supported this study. Two of the authors report various financial arrangements with Sanofi-Aventis, GlaxoSmithKline, Arrow Therapeutics, and/or Alnylam Pharmaceuticals.
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">"During the past decade, the enthusiasm for developing RSV vaccines has declined substantially among vaccine-development companies," Drs. Sethi and Murphy note. "A combination of the inherent scientific challenges, the high-risk nature of the target populations, and the enormous cost of vaccine development probably accounts for the lower priority given to RSV vaccine programs. . . . These observations should provide an impetus to renew research on the treatment and prevention of RSV infection — progress that is far from satisfactory at present."<br><br>
Dr. Murphy reports having a licensing agreement with Wyeth for bacterial vaccine development</td>
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What a liar!<br>
The reason no one's wanted to do an RSV vax for so long is because of the fiasco that happened with the first, infamous RSV vax they made in the 60's that, instead of producing "immunity", made RSV <i>worse</i> in the vaxed babies, resulting in deaths in the vaxed. And it took them quite a while to even come up with any good guesses about why that happened, and they're <i>still</i> not sure what was up with that!
 
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