Mothering Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,432 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
<p>Sorry, I'm back again with more questions!  The Montessori we're looking at is a full day Montessori (we would be using this instead of daycare for the time that I'm at work) so it would be about a total of 8 hours per day.  Does anybody know how this is typically structured in a Montessori environment (DD would be in the 0-2 age group initially)? We plan on asking about the specific schedule but I wanted to see what was typical first.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I've seen other people saying here that their Montessori requires a nap... how do they do that exactly because DD no longer naps (or at least definitely not daily)? </p>
<p> </p>
<p>Another question.  I get that Montessori teachers are supposed to show lessons to kids that are at their level but how do they determine this?  Like I mentioned the school will be in DD's second language, which she isn't nearly as strong in as English, so I'm wondering if there will be any problems finding a good fit?  She understands very well but her vocab is just significantly smaller... Would he/she ask us first or something? </p>
<p> </p>
<p>Sorry, I'm almost done with questions but here's the last one.  How does separation anxiety factor into this?  DD's always had it pretty bad (she's had a babysitter for over a year now and still freaks out every time even though she clearly loves our babysitter).  Everything I've been seeing on the internet makes it seem like kids should already be over separation anxiety before they start preschool but since they have a 0-2 room that can't be possible, right?</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I'm slowing making my way through Montessori: The science behind genius, I'm really enjoying it at the moment and am starting to get very excited for DD to start Montessori soon! :D</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,242 Posts
<p>We don't have a 0-2 class, so I'm not sure how helpful this will be, but the schedule for our 2-3 year old group is: Montessori work from 8:45-12 (with outside time and circle time during that time as well), lunch from 12-12:45, then nap for all kids under 4 (state regulations; some kids don't fall asleep and after they try for a while they are allowed to quietly look at books) during nap time the older kids play outside and then do more Montessori work until pick up time at 3, when they wake up the nappers. Before and after regular school hours the school becomes like a play-based daycare with "regular" toys and crafts available to the kids (none of those toys are available during the regular Montessori school day).</p>
<p> </p>
<p>As for your language concerns, IMO in a good Montessori the teachers will be adept at observing the children while they work and judging what the child is ready for next based on that-- language should not be as important in determining what lessons a child is ready for, as many of the lessons can be given through demonstration and do not require a lot of language.  We've had many kids come into our school with English as a second language and they start right in on the Montessori work and later start to pick up English gradually.  It does not hold them back on working with most of the Montessori materials.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Of course your child will have to transition and may have some separation anxiety, and I'm sure the teachers are ready for that.  My younger son had a difficult transition at age 2 (he cried every day for 2 weeks, it nearly broke my heart) but since then he has loved every minute of his school. I'm sure your DD will love it once she gets used to the routine!</p>
<p> </p>
<p>(Edited to clarify our schedule and nap policy)</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,191 Posts
<p>NAK...</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Naps are often actually required for legal certifications for early childhood facilites- that the facility provides the time, space and mats for naps. Montessori or not. Don't stress it. I'm sure yours won't be the first non-napper they've ever had! Just ask them what they do!</p>
<p> </p>
<p>And, they determine the works with knowing the child in conjunction with developmental understanding. Toddlers, regardless of age, like to play with water. They like the challenges of using tools, they like washing tables, etc. So the teacher can begin with some developmentally targeted activities and work from there, refining as they get a better sense of where the child is. The child will also see others and will show her interests by watching and participating with other children in the materials that are around.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,923 Posts
<p>Traditional Montessori preschool programs are for ages 3-6, so a lot of what you've heard about Montessori doesn't necessarily transfer to an infant and toddler program.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>My daughter was in a toddler program last year for 18-36 month olds.  The works that they did tended to be more Montessori-inspired than the works M. Montessori herself designed.  There were a lot more guided group activities than in a 3-6 year old classroom, and they did a lot of arts and crafts, music, organized games.  There was still a dedicated work period, but I think it was more like two 45 minute dedicated work periods.  I'm not sure exactly how long it was, but the kids definitely weren't expected to have the attention span of 3-6 year olds.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>My daughter just went for the morning, but the school also served as a daycare so lots of kids stayed for the afternoon.  I think in the afternoon they had lunch, nap, a second outdoor recess, did some more arts and crafts, read some books, and did some more work.  My understanding is that most Montessori schools don't have the aftercare kids play with the work, but I think since these works were less delicate and a bit more toy-like than the normal 3-6yo Montessori works, it didn't really matter.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Naps in daycare are state mandated, so the school doesn't have a choice about your daughter napping.  But she won't be the first non-napper they've had to convince, and she won't be the last, and you'll be surprised at how quickly they get her to nap.  A lot of it is peer pressure: they do learn quickly, I think, that nap time is non negotiable.  </p>
<p> </p>
<p>I wouldn't worry about the language: most of the kids in a 0-2 room probably can't speak any language at all!  I'm sure your DD will pick things up quickly.</p>
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top