Mothering Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

Registered
Joined
532 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My mom and I are kinda having it out about my 12 yo sister getting the Gardasil vac. We are a pretty open family so of course my mom wanted my take. While I think that anything that can prevent cancer would be great......I don' tknow how I feel about explaining to my 12yo sister exactly everything that is involved with why she needs to worry about HPV and such. She is a young 12 yo who as of yet has no interest in "boy chasing" or anything of the sort...<br><br>
Has anyone on here done any research on this themselves?
 

Registered
Joined
1,836 Posts
i just went to a seminar by dr eisenstein on vaccines. this came up. he said cervical cancer is basically the rarest form of cancer...or something along those lines...or something with hpv causing the cancer being extremely rare. he said this vaccine is absolutely ridiculous and is a huge moneymaking scam. i have to say i agree. jmo.
 

Registered
Joined
7,115 Posts
I think this is not a good vaccine (not sure if there are any, but this one doesn't seem to be one anyway). But I guess I honestly don't understand the arguments I've heard from the right that it will encourage promicuity. When did anyone ever explain a shot to a kid anyway? You just tell them they have to have a shot and it's done, that seems to be how most people do it. In fact, most people don't even seem to know what shots the doc is giving their kid, or what they are supposed to protect against. So why is this one different?<br><br>
So in addition to not seeing how girls are going to run right out and be promiscious because they had a shot (yeah, lol, when I was 12 - or any age, actually - fear of HPV was my #1 reason for staying a virgin... um... NOT!!!!!!!!) I just don't see why this shot requires a lot of explanation when the others get zero.
 

Registered
Joined
147 Posts
For me it is way too young of a vaccine for me to concider giving it to my daughter, what if it is breeding an entire generation of sterile girls? perhaps a little extreme but still. Also, why not teach safe sex and regular paps? Regardless of shot or not paps are still the best tool against cervical cancer. My mom(the nurse) totally agreed with the young vaccine argument. good luck!
 

Registered
Joined
4,244 Posts
Here <a href="http://www.rightsforamerica.com/wordpress/?p=8" target="_blank">http://www.rightsforamerica.com/wordpress/?p=8</a><br><br>
Also Gardasil contains Polysorbate 80, which is linked to infertility in mice There is a chance that it could cause infertility its scary to think a series of 3 injections could take away a little girls ability to become a mother <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> . BUT it has NEVER been studied.<br><br>
Not to mention<br>
225 mcg aluminum<br>
50 mcg of polysorbate 80 (Tween 80)<br>
35 mcg of sodium borate ( Borax)
 

Registered
Joined
532 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>laohaire</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7951490"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I just don't see why this shot requires a lot of explanation when the others get zero.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
As I thought I had said but guess I didn't, we are a very very open family, so we discuss EVERYTHING openly. My mother was a delayed vac with her and explained everything about the vac's when the time came. Also I don't think that the vac will make her go out and have sex or what not, but I do know that explaining why she needs a shot for something she may never encounter because we have already discussed safe sex and personal care...<br><br>
I agree with one thing you said...most people don't explain shots...but obviously this is bringing vacs to the forefront and hopefully make more people aware of the cause and effect of vacs. I know I personally am more concerned with the vac being so young and the real results can be measured as of yet!!
 

Registered
Joined
785 Posts
I actually participated in the HPV vaccine study in college(10 years ago). Luckily I recently found out I got the placebo. The particular one they were studying in my case did not get approved. At the time I did not know any better and they paid me $750.00. That is really here not there just interesting now that I no vax my dd.<br><br>
I don't want to come across as insensitive but as a pp stated cervical cancer is very rare. It is also treatable and pretty easy to detect at an early stage if you have regular paps. Also Guardasil doesn't eally prevent cervical cancer. It theoretically prevents teh transmission of some of the strains of Human Papaloma Virus that may lead to cervical cancer in some woman. Considering that you can actually make a choice about protecting yourself from HPV it doesn't seem like a risk I would be willing to take. Especially with a vaccine that is so new. Wait ten years! My sister is 18 adn accordin g to her(I believe her) not sexually active and asked what i thought. I basically told her that I hoped that if she was going to be sexually active she would be using condoms, especially at this point in her life. I also discussed making sure that she has paps done etc.<br><br>
My plan wiht my dd, if Hep B and Guardasil are still around is to let her decide ( when she is like 15) but provide her with all of the info I can about vax risks. It is her body and IMHO her choice, even at 12 years old.
 

Registered
Joined
824 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>alegna</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7951513"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I would never consider such a new vaccine.<br><br>
-Angela</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Exactly what I was going to say. Even if you are pro-vax, this one is just too new.
 

Registered
Joined
16,116 Posts
I know I'm grabbing an old thread, but I really feel this is too important:<br><br>
here is an excerpt from another group I read:<br>
here are some facts:<br><br>
*While it is true that more than 80% of women will be exposed to HPV over the course of their lifetime, cervical cancer is a rare manifestation of HPV infection. Less than 10,000 women in the United States will be diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer during 2007 (American Cancer Society <a href="http://www.cancer.org" target="_blank">www.cancer.org</a>)<br><br>
*More than 50% of cervical cancer cases affect women who have not been adequately screened in the previous five years (American Cancer Society)<br><br>
*Cervical cancer disporportinately affects minority women due to cultural barriers to screening and lack of access to healthcare (CDC)<br><br>
*Routine screening has resulted in a reduction of invasive cervical cancer rates by more than 75% since Pap testing became available in the 1950s (American Cancer Society)<br><br>
*The risk of developing invasive cervical cancer or cervical interepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 3 in women who have normal pap results and negative HPV test results is less than 1/1000 (American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists)<br><b><br>
*Most women with healthy immune systems clear the HPV virus in less than 2 years with no resulting cervical cell changes.</b> In a study of patients (aged 30 and older) receiving routine cervical cancer screening with a combination of the HPV test and the Pap test showed HPV positivity rates of less than 5% (Kaiser Northern CA, published 2006)<br><br><b>*Cervical cancer is caused by 13 types of high-risk HPV-Gardasil only protects against 16 and 18 which account for approximately 70% of cervical cancers. Even with widespread vaccination, women will continue to need routine cervical cancer screening (Gardasil package insert)</b><br><br>
*Gardasil has been on the market for less than one-year-no other vaccine has been so quickly accepted and pushed for with regards to school mandates. Additionally, Gardasil is now carries the highest rate of reported reactions since it's approval (VAERS data 2006/2007)<br><br><br>
Basically stated, this vaccine, which is very new and has had inadequate testing, does NOT prevent cancer. it prevents against SOME kinds of HPV, SOME of the time - this means that even if one has the vaccine, you still have to go for regular PAP smears.<br><br>
so its basically ineffective and still leaves girls at risk. So why take a vaccine that is known to have ill side effects in clinical trials, and that hasnt even had a full set of long-term trials???
 

Registered
Joined
217 Posts
While it is extremely successful (over 90%) in preventing the transmission of the four strain of HPV which can cause cervical cancer, I think it is still to new (for my liking anyway).<br>
I also think it may confer idea idea to some girls (I'm not saying your sister but some) that because they have the vax that they somehow don't need regular cervical smears - which they DO.
 

Registered
Joined
10,813 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>DavinaT</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8010577"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">the <span style="color:#0000FF;">four</span> strain of HPV which can cause cervical cancer</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
The vaccine contains just <span style="color:#FF0000;"><b>two (2)</b></span> strains which may cause cervical cancer. There are a lot more strains which can and do lead to cervical cancer . . . and you can have one or more strains at one time and during your lifetime.
 

Registered
Joined
10,142 Posts
The latest issue of Mothering has an article about it.<br><br>
If I remember correctly, it is very new and has only been tested on age 15 and up, and not for very long for that age.
 

Registered
Joined
4,190 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Momtwice</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8010820"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">The latest issue of Mothering has an article about it.<br><br>
If I remember correctly, it is very new and has only been tested on age 15 and up, and not for very long for that age.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Yes, and what's more, they vaxed everyone who originally got the placebo, so it would be impossible to do a long-term follow-up study even if you wanted to.<br><br>
Julia<br>
dd 1 <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">
 

Registered
Joined
1,143 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Romana9+2</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8012399"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Yes, and what's more, they vaxed everyone who originally got the placebo, so it would be impossible to do a long-term follow-up study even if you wanted to.<br><br>
Julia<br>
dd 1 <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love"></div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
That is interesting to note. Funny how they nicely avoided 'our' being able to prove the actual side effects of the vaccine by giving it to the placebo recipients as well!
 

Registered
Joined
1,570 Posts
and let me quickly add the serotype replacement issue...they just discovered that prevnar, which reduces the incidence of illness by the strains its covers by at least 67%, has lead to an emergence of replacement strains which rarely caused disease prior to the administration of the vaccine.<br><br><a href="http://thestar.com.my/news/story.asp?file=/2007/4/25/worldupdates/2007-04-25T022731Z_01_NOOTR_RTRJONC_0_-295514-1&sec=worldupdates" target="_blank">http://thestar.com.my/news/story.asp...c=worldupdates</a><br><br>
from the article:<br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Since 2004, diseases caused by strains of bacteria not covered by the vaccine have risen by <b>140 percent</b> compared with the pre-vaccine period</td>
</tr></table></div>
So, sure - gardasil might knock out strain 16 and 18 - currently responsible for most cases of cervical cancer - that doesn't mean that in 10 years (when your little sis is more at risk) that two other strains not covered by the vaccine won't be wreaking havoc...let's hope knocking out 16 and 18 doesn't make way for a more lethal strain to have its way on the cervix. best to wait and see what happens long-term with vaccine..
 

Registered
Joined
5,396 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>marie1080</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7957162"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Exactly what I was going to say. Even if you are pro-vax, this one is just too new.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
I agree, my 10 year old is not getting it. I just keep on thinking of the rotavirus vaccination that was pulled.
 

Registered
Joined
470 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>majikfaerie</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8009552"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I know I'm grabbing an old thread, but I really feel this is too important:<br><br>
here is an excerpt from another group I read:<br>
here are some facts:<br><br>
*While it is true that more than 80% of women will be exposed to HPV over the course of their lifetime, cervical cancer is a rare manifestation of HPV infection. Less than 10,000 women in the United States will be diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer during 2007 (American Cancer Society <a href="http://www.cancer.org" target="_blank">www.cancer.org</a>)<br><br>
*More than 50% of cervical cancer cases affect women who have not been adequately screened in the previous five years (American Cancer Society)<br><br>
*Cervical cancer disporportinately affects minority women due to cultural barriers to screening and lack of access to healthcare (CDC)<br><br>
*Routine screening has resulted in a reduction of invasive cervical cancer rates by more than 75% since Pap testing became available in the 1950s (American Cancer Society)<br><br>
*The risk of developing invasive cervical cancer or cervical interepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 3 in women who have normal pap results and negative HPV test results is less than 1/1000 (American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists)<br><b><br>
*Most women with healthy immune systems clear the HPV virus in less than 2 years with no resulting cervical cell changes.</b> In a study of patients (aged 30 and older) receiving routine cervical cancer screening with a combination of the HPV test and the Pap test showed HPV positivity rates of less than 5% (Kaiser Northern CA, published 2006)<br><br><b>*Cervical cancer is caused by 13 types of high-risk HPV-Gardasil only protects against 16 and 18 which account for approximately 70% of cervical cancers. Even with widespread vaccination, women will continue to need routine cervical cancer screening (Gardasil package insert)</b><br><br>
*Gardasil has been on the market for less than one-year-no other vaccine has been so quickly accepted and pushed for with regards to school mandates. Additionally, Gardasil is now carries the highest rate of reported reactions since it's approval (VAERS data 2006/2007)<br><br><br>
Basically stated, this vaccine, which is very new and has had inadequate testing, does NOT prevent cancer. it prevents against SOME kinds of HPV, SOME of the time - this means that even if one has the vaccine, you still have to go for regular PAP smears.<br><br>
so its basically ineffective and still leaves girls at risk. So why take a vaccine that is known to have ill side effects in clinical trials, and that hasnt even had a full set of long-term trials???</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Based on this alone it sounds like it would be best to talk to our kids about sex, condoms and the importance of routine pap smears rather then inject a substance into the body which may or may not have more serious side effects and may or may not prevent cervical cancer.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top