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Hello everyone. I'm new to this forum, and hope I'm in the right topic area. To those who HS, I am curious as to the curriculums you all use/follow. We are currently expats, but when we move back to the states (maybe this summer) my husband and I are considering homeschool. I'm in the process of garhering information to help with our decision....so at pros/cons would be most welcome too. ;) We have an eight year old, a six year old, and a three year old. Many thanks!
 

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I've reached the end of my homeschooling adventures, but my kids (now 13 through 23) were all homeschooled until about 10th grade. We never really used a curriculum although they grazed through most of Singapore Primary Math if and when they wanted to. They read, they explored, they did sports and music and dance, we watched lots of videos and gardened and had lots of conversations and we travelled and volunteered and got to know our community.

It was enough for them. They were all well ahead in academics when they entered school.

Cons ... For me, lack of time for self-care. And, eventually, by around adolescence, my kids hit the limits of what our home and community could offer them in their areas of passion. We live quite rurally in a village of 600, far from big cities, and that was certainly a factor.

Pros ... Too many to list. But at the top of the list I would say: my kids had the freedom and security to fully be who they are, and to grow up comfortable in their own skins. When I was first considering homeschooling a friend of mine who was a teacher in the school system told me "I've watched a lot of homeschooled kids come into the school system and they're all over the map in terms of background and ability and personality and knowledge. But one thing they all have: they know who they are." I didn't really understand why that should be true, and why it should be so obvious to him, but I see it in my own kids now.

And the other big pro for me is flexibility. Flexibility of learning style, schedule, pacing, content, lifestyle.... flexible relationships, expectations, approaches... if something wasn't working or didn't feel optimal it could change on a dime. If we wanted to focus on music theory instead of multiplication, or building a website instead of analyzing poetry, or supporting grandpa's palliative care instead of anything else, we could do what was best for us.

Miranda
 
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