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Any of you still dealing with that? Either while you had the baby or are still doing some form of treatment??
I'm doing a HB, and I'm trying to figure out how to lower the count or make it go away. Did any of you do a treatment besides the IV at a hospital?
 

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haven't gotten test result back so I can't tell you if it worked but taking a probiotic, using vinegar washes after sex and bath, and put vinegar in a tub of baby wipes for after toilet washes. all tings reccomended by mw.
other people go further and use garlic inserted and such.
 

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I actually tested neg, but if I were positive, my HB MW would have had me to a vaginal rinse with dilluted hibiclens once I went into labor. I think she said she usually puts 2 oz. hibiclens in a peri bottle, fill the rest w/ water, then have me sit on the toilet or go into the shower and rinse my vag really well. I've read that studies show mixed results for such treatment. There are GBS diets though to encourage you to convert from positive to negative - do a search. I think they involve lots of garlic...
 

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while i didn't have testing for GBS i have been doing remedies to help w/ other infections....garlic suppositories overnight, tampon soaked in olive oil and 10-15 drops of TTO left in for at least an hour (preferably a few times a day...although I only did it once a day), GSE tablets 3-4 tablets 3x a day, and one probiotic pearl 3x a day....this really did seem to help with my systems and she said if I were GBS+ that would knock it out too. Oh...i did this for a week.
 

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If you test GBS positive and you have a home birth, do you take the antibiotics orally?-- if you choose to take them, that is. I was planning to ask my mw today, but she had to postpone our appt.
 

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I'm GBS+ this time again. I beat it...well, reversed the status, last time around by slamming probiotics, watching how much sugar I ate, and ate more garlic and drank a ton of water. And I had on hand the hibiclens for a douche if my water broke early or if I ended up pushing a long time.

This time I'm currently eating my way through a half a batch of brownies that I HAD to have so the sugar thing is probably hindering my probiotic efforts...but I am going to take one for the team and down a T of honey with crushed raw garlic in it. Honey's supposed to be antibacterial and garlic is great for immunity. And then probiotic capsules 2-3x/day, 2 caps at each dose. I figure at the very least this will knock the infection back and I can only hope for an intact bag of waters through dialation like I had last time.

But try something, and be retested every week if you can until the birth.
 

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my midwife said if I wanted she could give a shot of antibiotic intra-muscularly, I don't think a pill works fast enough?
but even with gbs pos - I am still waiting on test - that it was my choice.

Quote:

Originally Posted by lunabelly View Post
If you test GBS positive and you have a home birth, do you take the antibiotics orally?-- if you choose to take them, that is. I was planning to ask my mw today, but she had to postpone our appt.
 

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I saw the post on the main board and popped in to share my experience. I was instructed to take Goldenseal and Echinecea tincture (NOT the combined one it had to be seperate) and Garlic pills for two weeks. I never got a chance to find out if it worked or not.
 

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I have included below an excerpt from an email from my midwife. The pertinent part of it is that while chlorhexadrine may "prevent" the GBS transmission, the secondary infections like pneumonia and meningitis did not decline at all. I don't know how that's possible, but the secondary infections are the things that are frightening, not the GBS.
If you do decide to do anything that is "antibacterial" like garlic, or echinacea/goldenseal, please remember to continue the "treatment" until birth or you could recolonize and face the same risks to the infant without realizing it. The goal isn't to have a negative test, it's to not be colonized at the time of birth.
Chance

Pediatricians are quite understandably, nuts about GBS. Most of the docs at ICP have demonstrated quite a bit of flexibility in under-treated infants (i.e. mom got the center ready to push), just asking to see the baby within 24 hours.

Below is the Cochrane review article. Cochrane is a data base maintained by very respected epidemiologists and obgyn physicians. They are constantly evaluating the current research and their conclusions are to be considered "gold". You may or may not be able to read all the medical gobbledygook, but basically, although chlorhaxadine reduced colonization of infants, it did not reduce GBS disease (pneumonia & meningitis) or death from those diseases.

tough issue.

samantha

Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2004;(3):CD003520. Links
Vaginal chlorhexidine during labour to prevent early-onset neonatal group B streptococcal infection.
Stade B,
Shah V,
Ohlsson A.
Pediatrics, St. Michael's Hospital, 30 Bond Street, 15th Floor Cardinal Carter Wing, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5B1W8. [email protected]

BACKGROUND: Early-onset group B beta-hemolytic streptococcus (GBS) infection accounts for approximately 30% of neonatal infections, has a high mortality rate and is acquired through vertical transmission from colonized mothers. Several trials have demonstrated the efficacy of intrapartum chemoprophylaxis (IPC) for preventing early-onset disease (EOD). Vaginal disinfection with chlorhexidine during labour has been proposed as another strategy for preventing GBS EOD in the preterm and term neonate. Chlorhexidine has been found to have no impact on antibiotic resistance, is inexpensive, and applicable to poorly equipped delivery sites. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness of vaginal disinfection with chlorhexidine during labour for preventing early-onset GBS infection in preterm and term neonates. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth trials register (October 2003), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, Issue 3, 2003), MEDLINE (1966 to October 2003), EMBASE (1980 to March 2003), CINAHL (1982 to March 2003) and LILACS (1982 to September 2003). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized and quasi-randomized trials comparing vaginal disinfection with chlorhexidine to placebo, or no treatment. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We extracted information from the results sections of the included studies. We reported relative risk (RR) and risk difference (RD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous outcomes. We calculated the number needed to treat (NNT) with 95% CIs when a statistically significant RD was found. We used a chi square test (chi2) and the I2 analysis to test for heterogeneity, and applied a fixed or random effects model accordingly. MAIN RESULTS: Five studies, including approximately 2190 term and preterm infants, met the inclusion criteria and reported on at least one of the outcomes of interest for this systematic review. When all studies were combined there was a statistically significant (p = 0.005) reduction in colonisation (RR 0.72, 95% CI 0.56 to 0.91); RD -0.16 (95% CI -0.26 to -0.05); NNT 6 (95% CI 4 to 20). There was no statistically significant between-study heterogeneity. There was no statistically significant between-study heterogeneity both for RR (chi(2) = 3.21 [p = 0.2], I(2) = 37.8%) and for RD (chi(2) = 1.66 [p = 0.44], I(2) = 0%). There was no statistically significant reduction in EOD including GBS infection, GBS pneumonia, GBS meningitis or mortality. REVIEWERS' CONCLUSIONS: Vaginal chlorhexidine resulted in a statistically significant reduction in GBS colonisation of neonates, but was not associated with reductions in other outcomes. The review currently does not support the use of vaginal disinfection with chlorhexidine in labour for preventing EOD. Results should be interpreted with caution as the methodological quality of the studies was poor.

PMID: 15266490 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
 
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