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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey goatlady or any goat mamas. In need some input. We are in the midst of a massive change. Selling our current place and moving back to Oregon (yay!) and are looking for new land. While we look we will be living on my parent's property and may do some bouncing around while we are looking for our new place. I also have the opportunity to get two young goats. I have housesat for friends with goats so I have done my share of milking and kid-care, and have been doing my research. How possible do you think it would be to drag these goats along with us? How would the goats do with something like this. I probably should just wait until we are settled, but this opportunity feel like something I should take, IYKWIM. We will also be dragging along 11 chickens, 2 ducks, 1 rabbit, and a beehive, lol. Thanks
 

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You know how Dr. Dre isn't really a doctor, well, I'm not really a goatlady.
I mean, I want to be, but I live in a subdivision right now until our move to hopefully some land! :LOL Sorry about the confusion! I get raw milk from nubians though. I've read some of my goat lady's books, but I really don't have much knowledge. Sorry I can't answer your questions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
:LOL Oh sorry! I think we have already had this conversation, lol. Well, if you have any ideas, let me know. Is it the other mom here with a goat name that has some?d Off to investigate...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Oh thanks for the encouragement! I think it will be a level of craziness that it just couldn't get any more chaotic. Did I mention I will be having a baby lol. I think we will just go for it.
:
 

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Goats are real susceptible to "shipping fevers" which can typically turn into upper respitory infections. Goats are very stressful animals. If you want to keep your goats/milk organic then I would suggest you wait....we have yet to find a natural remedy that works for pasturella which causes the shipping fevers.
 

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We travelled to KY from GA to pick up our goats., and we never had any problems. They travelled well and didn't get sick afterwards, but it CAN happen. Please be sure the place you're moving to will have adequate fencing/housing for goats. Those two things are really important. All you need is the added stress of having to get goats set up and settled.

I would suggest waiting until you've found your own place and can have it fenced the way you'd like it. Maybe your friend will hold the goats for you? And there are lots of great goat breeders near Oregon.

BTW - we have Nigerian dwarf goats and Mini Nubians. I'd love to discuss the ins and outs of the goat world if anyone is interested!

Wendy
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the info! We decided to have the person hold the goats for us until we are settled. We have a piece of land now but are waiting for all the septic/ well/ permit stuff to go through. So it will only be one trip for the animals. Until then I am doing my research. I have some experience and have been reading a lot, but any helpful tips would be great.
 

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Hi Wendy,
We raise Boers and sell wethers for meat (farm income). We have 2 Nubians we milk. I would LOVE to get mini Nubians. Goats are scarce here in Louisiana so we end up traveling very far and spending way too much. Everyone thinks we are crazy for raising the boers for income as this is "cattle" country. Well, everyone thinks we are crazy for a lot of things. LOL! I could talk goats all day long... I have a few questions for those that house several goats. Do you have them on any disease prevention program? What do you use to worm them or do you? We have to be very careful since we are on a rather large scale. I'm looking for alternatives to vaccines & chemical wormers. Goat information is very, very hard to find.
 

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farmer_mama,
I know several have mentioned electric fencing BUT I would not suggest it at all. We have raised goats for 4 years and have never had any luck keeping them behind it. We use goat panels and stay tight brand fencing similar to net wire but smaller holes so the goats cannot get their heads through it. I also favor it because it keeps predators out unless they dig or climb in. Although we do have 2 large Anatolian/Pyrenees for guards since losing goats to neighboring pets. I'm not sure what type of area you will live in but feral dogs or even pets, wolves, & coyotes are threats. This is why fencing is so important to me, but we live on 50 acres of partially wooded land.

I would like to suggest a book for raising milk goats. It is called Raising Milk Goats The Modern Way. The title states "modern way" but it was written in 1975 and it has great information about housing, fencing, feeding, grooming, overall health, breeding, kidding, & milking. It also teaches a little about making goat milk products such as cheese. I also like the website http://hoeggergoatsupply.com/xcart/home.php. You can sign up for their free catalog. They have some really great general care information inside their catalog. They carry milking supplies & cheese (many different types), butter, yogurt, kefir, making supplies.
 

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My absolute favorite website for goat information is http://fiascofarm.com/goats/
There is a ton of information on that site.
Makinleesmom - they raise their goats without vaccines and with more natural methods of worming, etc., and they have links on their site regarding where you can buy natural supplies.

We only have a small herd right now - four Mini Nubians, eight Nigerian dwarves, and a mini Toggenburg. Most of our does are pregnant and should be kidding this fall.

Goats are awesome animals. My children (and dh and I, too) love to watch them. They are *at least* as curious as a cat and as friendly as a dog. Ours all come running when they see us.

I'm raising my goats for milk-related products. We'll be selling milk for pet consumption - like for feeding a litter of puppies that the mama dog can't feed. It's a little more complicated to actually sell raw milk for human consumption. We'll use their milk for making butter, cheese, and soaps, though.

Wendy
 

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One more thing, farmer mama -

You didn't say if the goats you were being offered were male or female. If they are boys, you will definitely want to get them neutered. Bucks, or unaltered males, make terrible pets - not because they are mean, just because they can smell really bad. Bucks are gross, no other way around it. They do nasty things - like spraying urine on their necks and faces - this makes them attractive to the lady goats but yucky to us. Most small herd owners don't even have a buck unless thay have five or more does. It's easier to transport your does to have them bred. Just thought you might like to know if you didn't already....
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for the info, keep it coming! makinleesmom- I have heard great things about panels, but they seem to be hard to find. Any ideas? We will be off grid so electric fencing won't work anyway. I just found a book about homeopathy for goats today. Should be an interesting read. Could you goat keeping mamas tell me about what you house your goats in, and what works and what you would do differently? Thanks.
 

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farmer,
We use cedar planks (cut from our land) for the housing structure and tin for the roofs. They are fairly small like 4-5 ft tall, 8 ft wide, & about 6-8 ft deep. I'd have to ask the DH the exact measurements. We have a lot of them scattered over the pastures. We try and keep them small so they can be moved. Goats are not very sanitary house keepers. The roof is slightly pitched to allow rain run off. We also make sure the rear of the structure is facing north to protect them in the winter months. A few other things we have for them is a see-saw, jump boxes, and rough stones/small boulders. They (the kids especially) love to climb and jump. We used cedar to create square boxes/cubes. The see-saw was DH's idea and they love it. The rough stones are for them to not only climb but provide an area to naturally groom their hooves. We live in Louisiana so our land is fairly soft and wet which can cause overgrowth in hooves and foot rot. We usually go to the highway department's yard and get old large cement pieces where they have removed a road or something. We stack them up to create a "mountain" and use purchased cement to bind them together. This is their favorite toy. As Wendy stated they are like big dogs and love to play!

Wendy,
I've never heard that about the goat's coat and electric fencing. All I know is they are very determined animals that think the grass is greener on the other side. LOL! I have visited the fiasco website before and I plan to research a little more. I plan to keep my milk goats naturally but the commercial herd I'm not sure about yet. If we could get our meat goats certified organic I may consider it. I have a lot of research to do. Do you recommend certain products as far as wormers? Also, do you have concerns about CAE or CL in your milk goats? Before I'm completely confident in my milk herd I believe I will have them tested to be safe.
 

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Forgot to mention about the goat panels. We finally found them 3 towns away at a farmer's co-op. They are 16ft long and I believe 48" tall. I think they are fairly new. If there are any farm supply stores in your area they may be able to order some for you. They tend to run around 30 dollars here. We tie them to wooden posts(incase we need to move them) or they can be nailed with large staples. Make sure the holes are no larger than 4"x4".
 

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I have a closed herd, and all of my goats have tested free of disease. I do worry about it some, though - that's one of the reasons I do not show my goats. CAE does not affect people, but I know that many owners put their goats down if they test positive, because there is no cure.

I'll try to get back to you about the wormer - we're experimenting now, so I'll let you know what works.

~W~
 

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We have nig. dwarfs and all of our shelters are pretty homemade and movable too
A super giant dog house we got off of freecycle is a favorite hangout, but we also made a three sided shelter they'll use in a pinch or when there's a disagreement over who gets to come into the dog house at night~! They love "toys" - they have a wooden construciton spool right now, and I'd love to find them some more or built them a see saw. Our permanent pasture is step in posts with 6 foot high stock wire - tiny openings since we have tiny goats! Next year I'd like to rotate them on our unused pasture so we'll be buying high electric net fencing to try out....they'll still head back to their perm. pasture at night, not only is it more secure, but goats LOVE their routine
I miss milking my girls, but the decision not to this pregnancy was def. the right one - I just don't have the energy. We're letting them feed their kids and then dry off instead. We should have a doe in milk come November, so we'll have our own milk again soon.... We have three does BTW, and send them elsewhere to be bred. I'd love a larger breed, especially a Saanen doe, but DH is worried we wouldn't be able to sell the babies for 4-H and would have to market them for meat, which he isn't ready to do. As far as disease prevention, we have a great vet, even if he is far away, and give our own yearly CDT shots. I have moved towards testing fecal samples and worming as neccessary now, so we don't have a regular worming schedule per se. We register our goats with the AGS - that seems to cover all the bases when we sell kids to be show goats/4-H projects.
 

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We use CDT also. We are also thinking of using a CL vaccine. Living in Louisiana they easily contract tetanus. I would LOVE ND's but you guys all live so far away!!! Why does your husband want to stay away from the meat market? We are very careful where we do market our goats and most of them all sold off of our land to a locally family owned plant. The others we take to a processing plant in the Houston, TX area. I know it's not the most human thing but we have to eat and the two mentioned plants kill in the most human way they can. I grew up on a cattle farm so I'm use to the cycle.

Has anyone eaten cabrito? It's actually quiet tasty if cooked correctly and the Boer breed is really mild not like the "brush" goat meats most people are familiar with.
 
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