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I've got a ton of questions, sorry!<br><br>
OK, so I go back to work in two weeks and my daughter is just now 3 months old. I'm able to bring her into work 3 days a week with me but I'll probably leave her with my mom twice a week. Luckily, they are only six hour shifts so it's not like a full day (either 7-12 or 12-6).<br><br>
I'm getting nervous because when we have tried to get her used to a bottle part time, she won't take it. I'm not in the room at the time (so that she can't smell me) but she just gets incredibly fussy with any attempt. While I"m secretly beaming that she loves breastfeeding so much, I'm becoming very aware of the fact that she will be without me for hours at a time in just two weeks and she'll need to eat.<br><br>
So, here are my questions:<br><br>
1. Is there a bottle that best simulates breastfeeding?<br><br>
2. How far in advance should I be pumping in order to make sure that she has enough?<br><br>
3. When she does breast feed now, I can't imagine pumping enough for the next day regardless. I've tried pumping and there is very little that comes out. And by the time I"m full enough to pump some milk, she's hungry so I feed her instead (back to square one....)<br><br>
4. Are there any secrets to get her to take a bottle that we're just not aware of yet?<br><br>
5. She won't take a pacifier either. I never wanted her to be dependant on one but I think that she sometimes uses my nipples as pacifiers and she's not really eating (case in point, she will look at me with sparkly eyes and smile/laugh while sucking on my nipple). So, I think if I could use a pacifier it would make the transition easier and she might not be as needy when it comes to me on a daily basis. Any recs on introducing a pacifier?<br><br>
6. Kind of a continuation of question #5, she is really needy with me. I've been at home with her since day one and therefore I know her best and she is most comfortable with me. My husband, grandparents, aunts/uncles can't seem to calm her down when she's really upset but as soon as she's in my arms, she's okay. Again, I'm flattered but it does get a little overwhelming and frustrating...any advice would be greatly appreciated!<br><br><br>
Thanks! Sorry for so many questions!
 

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I don't have answers to all of your questions, but will try to help out with a few!<br>
1) The Breastflow, Adiri Breastbottle, and Second Nature bottles are all designed for nursing babies. DD hates every single one (and I don't blame her, a bottle is much different than the breast). The only artifical nipple she'll accept is the basic/traditional latex Gerber newborn nipple.<br>
2) Start pumping as soon as you can. It doesn't hurt to get a freezer stash built up. You can also leave freshly expressed milk in the frigde for up to 5 days.<br>
3) Try pumping one breast while she is feeding on the other. If she is still hungry after finishing the one breast, you can always feed her the freshly pumped milk (by cup, spoon, or syringe if she won't take a bottle from you). If she's not still, hungry, freeze the milk in a storage bottle that you can slowly add to as you pump more (just don't add more fresh milk at a single time than what is already frozen). Pump frequently, even if it's only 30 minutes after the last nursing and you can't get much. You may feel like you are always pumping, but your body will adjust and start producing more milk. You can also try waking up once or twice during the night to pump...I found that I produced more milk at night.<br>
4) Some babies prefer warm nipples...try running the nipple under hot water (just make sure it's not too hot). Also, make sure you are warming the milk to body temperature. You can try wrapping one of your previously worn shirts around the bottle...some babies enjoy their mama's scent. Some babies like being held in a breastfeeding position, with their cheek touching the skin of whomever is offering the bottle. We found that DD only takes a bottle if she is sleeping or when the vacuum is running. Make sure your little one isn't too upset or hungry when a bottle is offered.<br>
5) Our DD won't take a paci, either. Make sure that whomever is watching her knows soothing techniques (patting, shushing, holding in a sling...whatever works for your little one). The pacis that DD will tolorate (we don't use them much and she doesn't care for them, either) are the newborn Soothie and the preemie size Gumdrop (both can be ordered online). Don't push the paci...she'll take it if/when she's ready. If she does decide to take it, it will most likely be at a time when she has a need to suck and you aren't around.<br>
5) Invite grandma over to spend a few days with you and your little one before you have to return to work. Grandma and your little one will likely develop their own techniques for calming.<br>
I know how difficult things are and what a stressful time this is. I also know that it's easier said than done, but try not to stress too much...you can work and continue your breastfeeding relationship!
 

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Everybody's baby is going to have a different "favorite bottle" so just try lots of different ones till you find the right one. (Mine likes the Playtex Ventaire with Natural Latch nipple.) Or try bottle alternatives: <a href="http://www.askdrsears.com/html/2/T026000.asp" target="_blank">http://www.askdrsears.com/html/2/T026000.asp</a><br><br>
First thing in the morning is a good time to pump, you have the most milk then.
 

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I second the advice to pump one side while baby is nursing on the other. It is a little awkward at first, but worth the practice. Also, do this first thing in the morning and you will get some yield. It can be so stressful to try pumping and not get any milk. I remember doing that before I went back to work and felt so defeated...then someone suggested the pumping and nursing at the same time. Baby is so much more efficient at initiating the let-down.<br><br>
Start pumping now to get some reserves.<br>
Unfortunatly I have never been able to pump enough for ds. My work situation is such that I can only pump once a day, so I'd suggest that while you are working to pump as often as you can. 2 5 minutes sessions will probably yield more than 1 10 minute.<br><br>
My ds liked the Dr. Brown's bottles. He's not picky, though about bottles.<br><br>
He was picky about pacifiers. I'm not endorsing using one, but I needed to try anything to keep my ds happy in the car. He was a screamer in the car until 7 months. It only sometimes helped on car rides. He finally took the Soothie brand pacifier (shaped most like a nipple, I think). You can find them at Target and other places. I introduced it at 7 weeks and he used it for maybe 2 months at most. He spits it out now or uses it for teething. I don't know what others feel, but it seems that once breastfeeding is well established and the pacifier is used only when you are away you are probably ok..<br><br>
Good luck
 
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