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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm taking my poor doggy to the vet tomorrow - he fell down the stairs twice yesterday and looks miserable, poor thing. His arthritis is getting bad.<br><br>
Anyway, I'm nervous about admitting to feeding him raw... should I lie? He has lost weight on raw, but I've never been to this vet before. Actually, we haven't been to the vet in about 4 years.
 

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No - don't lie. But I would say it couldn't hurt to arm yourself with some printouts from a good website about the benefits of a raw diet. ( I don't feed raw so I can't give an example) Don't assume that your vet will disapprove. You might be suprised. I believe that a lot of vets have started hearing more and more about alternative diets - especially in light of the recent pet food recalls.<br><br>
But, in case the vet does question you, you can just say "I brought this along just in case you hadn't heard about the benefits of raw. I've done a lot of research on it and I think we are providing a great diet." Try not to get defensive, just be informative. Point out the weight loss - because, if your dog has lost weight on the raw diet, that is probably a good thing. My dog has arthritis in his knee and our vet asks us to try to keep him a tad bit on the scrawny side.<br><br>
Now, about the arthritis - how old and what type of dog do you have? Does he take any supplements/medicines now?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
He's a blue heeler/sheltie mutt. He's 13 years old. he's never been actually diagnosed with arthritis but his back legs have gotten weaker and weaker over the past few years - we call him limpy now.<br><br>
He had ACL surgery when he was 2 years old, so he has always favoured one back leg and I think that's part of the problem. Also, he is still overweight.<br><br>
I've been giving him MSM and salmon oil. I used to give him glucosamine but the local health food store says MSM is better. I really have no idea...<br><br>
He also doesn't get much exercise and I have been trying to take him for a very short walk every day, but I'm not sure if that is helping or making him worse.
 

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My vet has never ONCE asked me what I fed my dogs, or cats for that matter. The only concern he ever had about what my animals ate was when I fed my chinchillas hay from walmart (Chinchilla had Giardia, she was treated, but were having trouble getting her to eat), he had one of the techs bring in some fresh hay grown on her farm for her horses.<br><br>
I wouldn't worry too much about it.<br><br>
But don't lie about it if he does ask.<br><br>
Dawn
 

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My vet once said (not too long after we switched) wow, they are looking really good and healthy. We said thats because we switched to raw. He basically just said oh<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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don't worry about it... Vet's get virtually NO training on nutrition.<br>
Just use any AP/NFL argument <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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I'm wondering if vets in this area might be more ok with rawfeeding? I don't know, but when I took Shiloh into a vet here in Burnaby, I mentioned raw and they didn't say anything in response, except that they hope it helps with her allergies. lol<br>
I wouldn't lie about it, personally. Just be prepared to smile and nod hehehe
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>greenmagick</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7944305"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">My vet once said (not too long after we switched) wow, they are looking really good and healthy. We said thats because we switched to raw. He basically just said oh<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"></div>
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that's pretty much the reaction that i got from my vet this year <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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We ran into this situation with our vet just a few weeks ago. I knew she would object, she presented her (uneducated) opinions about it and I ignored her. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
Previously, other than times when food would affect a medical condition, our vet has not questioned the furballs nutrition.<br><br>
If you're bringing your dog in for a specific reason, I wouldn't necessarily expect the vet to talk to you about what the dog is eating. If the vet doesn't ask, I don't see any reason to bring it up, and if the Dr does ask, tell him raw and that it's made a great difference in the health of your dog.
 

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The vet probably won't even ask what you are feeding. But ITA with the PP almost all the vets I've been to are completely clueless on nutrition, unless it is to sell Hill's brand <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">:<br><br>
We did discuss it at a previous vet visit but only because I brought the food issue up as a possible source of allergies and my dogs itching.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The vet didn't ask... actually he didn't ask about much, so I'm not terribly impressed. He told me that chances are my dog has arthritis (which is obvious) and that we could have x-rays done to confirm it if we want (not sure what the point of that would be.)<br><br>
He prescribed Rimadyl (NSAID) but we have to go back in 10 days for a blood test to see if it is affecting his kidneys.<br><br>
Not a word about my dog being overweight, and I asked about exercise and the vet said "you can take him for short walks if you want to." I was asking if it would be helpful or not, he didn't really answer my question. Kind of a waste of $70 if you ask me.
 

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I'm sorry you didn't get a lot of answers from your vet. It can be so frustrating. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"><br><br>
As I said, my dog has mild arthritis too. For now, we hold off on NSAIDs until I feel he truly needs it. And, it is for the reason you mentioned - once you start them, you need to monitor dog for side effects to the liver and kidneys. But, I'm prepared to start him on them once I feel he truly needs more pain management or his movement is compromised. Once a dog gets to the point where they really need them, rimadyl and other such drugs can work wonders. Just be sure to continue to have his liver/kidney function checked on a regular basis.<br><br>
According to my orthopedic vet- exercise in the form of short walks really can help. That is actually one of the reasons why the drugs can be good. It can make walking more comfortable, which can encourage more exercise, which in turn helps the joints. I would say give your dog a few days or a week on the rimadyl (so you can judge whether or not it is helping before adding exercise) and then start adding in short walks. Oh - and I give Jake Glucosamine and MSM. No reason you can't give your dog both - especially because it is easy to find them together in the same supplement.<br><br>
Good luck and I hope your dog starts feeling more sprightly very quickly!
 

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I was also going to suggest the glucosamine w/chondroitin and MSM. I would try to stay away from the Rimadyl unless you absolutely have no choice. Don't you love to spend that kind of money to be told virtually nothing? Arrrrgghhhh!!! That would be exactly why I try to do my own treatments before I break down and take them to the "doctor".
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Danemom</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7963198"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I was also going to suggest the glucosamine w/chondroitin and MSM. I would try to stay away from the Rimadyl unless you absolutely have no choice. Don't you love to spend that kind of money to be told virtually nothing? Arrrrgghhhh!!! That would be exactly why I try to do my own treatments before I break down and take them to the "doctor".</div>
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Danemom, would you avoid rimadyl or avoid all of those type drugs? Believe me, I am wary of them (as is my regular vet thankfully) She fully supports holding off on pain meds for arthritis until the dog's quality of life is being compromised by the pain/discomfort/stiffness. For now, we just use an aspirin every once in a while. But, in the OP's case with a 13 year old dog who is having trouble and pain walking and not getting enough exercise, I tend to think the benefits of pain relief outweigh the risks of long-term liver damage.
 

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With a dog that age you do have to weigh the pros and cons but I would still only use those types of drugs when absolutely necessary. I would use the glucosamine and MSM as an alternative as long as it was keeping the dog comfortable. Also, regular aspirin can tear up their tummies so we like to use Ascriptin (sp?) because it is coated and a little easier on the tummy. Although I would not blame/criticize anyone who felt they had to go those routes. Especially in geriatric pets. I just like to throw alternatives out there in hopes that they can be just as effective on the pain without causing damage to the organs.
 

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I know that there are documented side effects but our dogs arthritis was quite bad in his back and hips and we put him on rimadyl and I did notice an improvement in his getting around. He was about 12-13 when we put him on it. He made it to 15 and I think it did improve his quality of life. But it is definately a personal decision and unique to each dog and his individual health. I read up a lot on it and it's documented effects and was quite concerned but decided it was worth the risk in the end.
 
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