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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I think my dd is allergic to milk so I'm cutting it out of her diet. Actually, out of all ofour diets and I'm looking for some suggestions about ways to get calcium.
 

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dark leafy greens (kale, collard greens, chard) are excellent sources of calcium, more easily digested than milk. sesame seeds as well.<br><br>
this is a good resource (scroll down to the bottom of the page)...<br><a href="http://www.soystache.com/calcium.htm" target="_blank">http://www.soystache.com/calcium.htm</a>
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks.<br>
My dd is a pretty adventurous eater but I don't know if she'll go for the dark leafy greens. Any advice from anyone about good ways to get, say, kale into her diet?
 

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Here's a good list from the Vegetarian Resource Group (<a href="http://www.vrg.org/nutrition/calcium.htm):" target="_blank">http://www.vrg.org/nutrition/calcium.htm):</a><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Table 1: Calcium Content of Selected Vegan Foods<br><br>
Food/Amount Calcium (mg)<br>
Tofu, processed with calcium sulfate* 4 ounces 420<br>
Blackstrap molasses 2 Tbsp 400<br>
Collard greens, cooked 1 cup 357<br>
Calcium-fortified orange juice 8 ounces 300<br>
Soy or ricemilk, commercial, calcium-fortified, plain 8 ounces 200-300<br>
Commercial soy yogurt, plain 6 ounces 80-250<br>
Turnip greens, cooked 1 cup 249<br>
Tofu, processed with nigari* 4 ounces 80-230<br>
Tempeh 1 cup 215<br>
Kale, cooked 1 cup 179<br>
Soybeans, cooked 1 cup 175<br>
Okra, cooked 1 cup 172<br>
Bok choy, cooked 1 cup 158<br>
Mustard greens, cooked 1 cup 152<br>
Tahini 2 Tbsp 128<br>
Broccoli, cooked 1 cup 94<br>
Almonds 1/4 cup 89<br>
Almond butter 2 Tbsp 86<br>
Soy milk, commercial, plain 8 ounces 80<br><br>
*Read the label on your tofu container to see if it is processed with calcium sulfate or nigari.<br><br>
Note: Oxalic acid, which is found in spinach, rhubarb, chard, and beet greens binds with the calcium in those foods and reduces its absorption. These foods should not be considered good sources of calcium. Calcium in other green vegetables, like kale, collard greens, Chinese mustard greens, and Chinese cabbage flower leaves is well absorbed1,19. Fiber appears to have little effect on calcium absorption except for the fiber in wheat bran that does have a small effect20.<br><br>
Sources: Composition of Foods. USDA Nutrient Data Base for Standard Reference, Release 18, 2005 and Manufacturer's information.</td>
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mama2mygirl</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7264098"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Thanks.<br>
My dd is a pretty adventurous eater but I don't know if she'll go for the dark leafy greens. Any advice from anyone about good ways to get, say, kale into her diet?</div>
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Soups, smoothies, pasta sauce. In a smoothie combined with fruit you can barely tell it's there. You an also steam it and puree it into your pasta sauce. I blend and freeze it in small cubes (ice cube tray) and pull out a couple of blocks as needed.
 

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Bok choy is Asia's secret calcium-rich ingredient. You can make a really mean soup base using the stalk of bok choy. Then you can save the leaves for the end since they taste terrible if they're over cooked.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So, do I cook the kale first and then chop it up? Or blend it? And then put it in smoothies?
 

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the best way (i think) to do kale is wash it (remove stems if desired) and freeze it in a ziploc. the freezing process will get rid of some of the bitterness of the kale (in the south, the best kale is after the first frost), then when frozen smash it into little pieces and put in the smoothie, or toss it on top of your brown rice about 5 mins before it is done (steams itself), then stir it in. brown rice and minced up kale has a similar chewy texture.<br><br>
chard is also an good leafy green, and is less bitter than kale. it is good if you saute onion, olives, raisins and chopped chard stems in a pan then throw in the chard (there is a recipe for it on foodtv.com).
 

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I make vegetable potsticker soup using bok choy, celery, carrot, and onion as a base. I then add a little lemon, soy sauce, and the dumplings. When it's almost finished I add the cilantro and voila.
 

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You can also get calcium from fortified foods like tofu, tempeh, and OJ. But be careful if you are a veggie because many OJ's on the market are also fortified with vitamin D3 which is animal derived and can sometimes come from cow brains. If using kale in smoothies just cut it up in small pieces and add it to blender with other items and blend till smooth. we use raw Kale in our salad greens and of course other meals also.<br><br>
Grains and beans are great sources too. And no, veggie sources, are not harder on kids system's as pp posted. They are the best source of calcium for kids. Make sure that you are eating a varieds diet with lots of grains, beans, fruits, and veggies and your kids will thrive! Animal meat, bones, fluids are high in cholesterol, fat, antibiotics, pesticides, etc. Calcium, it has been researched, is leached from the body do to high intakes of animal proteins.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>vgnmama2keller</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7331030"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">But be careful if you are a veggie because many OJ's on the market are also fortified with vitamin D3 which is animal derived and can sometimes come from cow brains.</div>
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I didn't know that was the source! Unfortunately, vitamin D3 is the better source of vitamin D, NOT the one commonly used in fortified soymilk, D2 (ergocalciferol).<br><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Animal meat, bones, fluids are high in cholesterol, fat, antibiotics, pesticides, etc.</td>
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If you don't want to cut out meats, you can get grass-fed or at least organic meat from the health food store. And it's debatable that cholesterol or saturated fat is bad for you.<br><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Calcium, it has been researched, is leached from the body do to high intakes of animal proteins.</td>
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That's debatable too. Some of the studies that supposedly "prove" that protein is bad for you were done with isolated or fractionated amino acids from milk or eggs rather than from fresh meat.<br><br>
According to the results from the long-running Framingham Osteoporosis Study, eating a diet high in protein has a protective effect on your bones as you age. Among the 615 elderly people in the study, the ones who ate the most protein had the strongest bones, while the ones who ate the least protein had the weakest bones. And over the four-year study period, the people who ate the least protein lost significantly more bone mass than the people who ate the most protein. The connection held up regardless of age, weight, smoking habits, calcium intake and even estrogen use. (Hannan, M.T., Tucker K.L., Dawson-Hughes, B., et al.,"Effect of Dietary Protein on Bone Loss in Elderly Men and Women: The Framingham Osteoporosis Study," Journal of Bone Mineral Research, 15(12), 2000, pages 2504-2512.)<br><br>
According <a href="http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/abstract/75/4/773%20" target="_blank">to a similar study done with the elderly</a>, a high protein diet from whole foods consumed with enough calcium and vitamin D has a favorable effect on bones.
 

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We love kale smoothies here(including ds who is 2.5)<br><br>
1 c oj/pineapple juice/ or keifer, 1-2 bananas(frozen is good), 2 T flax, 2-3 c raw kale, 1 c very cold water or ice cubes- Blend until smooth, depending on your blender could take up to 5 min<br><br>
Bone broth is great. Roast a good grassfed chicken, then take the carcass throw it in the crockpot with some onion, carrots, etc and keep on low for 24-48 hrs, use in soups etc.<br><br>
I agree with a pp, I was just reading about the faulty science linking the osteoporosis with protein consumption.
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>JaneS</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7329311"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I would do bone broths. Veggie calcium is very hard for kids digestion to utilize.</div>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/yeahthat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="yeah that">: I just save up bones from whatever meat or chicken meals we have and keep them in the freezer along with vegetable scraps. Then I throw it all in the stock pot and simmer it for 24 hours. The result is a healthy broth that is an excellent source of calcium and other minerals.
 
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