Mothering Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,872 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
<a href="http://www.cleveland.com/newsflash/washington/index.ssf?/base/politics-2/1116826166280191.xml&storylist=washington" target="_blank">Gov't running out of surplus milk powder</a><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Sherrie Tussler</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">"Mountains of food come and go, and if it's not a mountain of powdered milk, there are mountains of other foods you can purchase," Tussler said. "It's not a travesty or a crisis that we're out of powdered milk, so much as it's a travesty or a crisis that we can't figure out how to use excess commodities to feed the poor."</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43,705 Posts
Why on earth are they going to cut so many people off from benefits?? If they can't get free milk and cheese to give away, how about purchasing dried beans to give away instead?? It's a much, much cheaper way to get protein!!<br><br>
If they're worried about calcium and vitamin D, why not spend the money on supplements instead? Beans plus a calcium/D supplement are cheaper than dry milk!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,952 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Ruthla</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Why on earth are they going to cut so many people off from benefits?? If they can't get free milk and cheese to give away, how about purchasing dried beans to give away instead?? It's a much, much cheaper way to get protein!!<br>
If they're worried about calcium and vitamin D, why not spend the money on supplements instead? Beans plus a calcium/D supplement are cheaper than dry milk!!!</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Silly you, you think our government gives away surplus food because it cares about people at risk of hunger and malnutrition? No! They give food away to use up agricultural surpluses! Here, I found a link to prove that cynical sounding assertion:<br><br><a href="http://www.nal.usda.gov/ric/ricpubs/foodstamps.htm" target="_blank">http://www.nal.usda.gov/ric/ricpubs/foodstamps.htm</a><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Dennis Roth's essay</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">n the 1920s, agricultural prices had declined, but in the early 1930s (during the start of the Great Depression) many agricultural products became virtually unmarketable. The Farm Board’s first action was to buy some of the surplus wheat that depressed markets could no longer absorb. Millions of bushels of government-owned wheat began accumulating in warehouses at the same time that reports of widespread hunger and malnutrition were appearing in the newspapers. Some Americans were troubled by this contradiction of suffering amid abundance and wondered if a way could be found to get some of this surplus food to the hungry. The Hoover Administration and Congress opposed any such effort, believing that it would undermine America’s work ethic. According to the Majority Leader of the House, John Q. Tilson, it was an idea of “revolutionary character” that would end the American tradition of self-reliance upon “community spirit and private generosity and establish the dole in the United States.” He and other politicians believed that organizations like the Red Cross would be able to care for the needy (Poppendieck, p. 40). They also questioned the extent of hunger in America, thus beginning a continuing debate over the definition and meaning of malnutrition and hunger.<br><br>
Typically, politicians who favored distribution of government wheat were concerned with its effect on the farm economy. Most felt it had to be justified as good farm economics before it could be sold as public welfare policy.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Get it? We have no concept of a social contract. Getting these programs started required persuading someone that it would help our economy, not just some poor people!
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top