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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
<p>I'm looking in to grad schools for after I graduate. I don't graduate until 2012, but I want to be prepared. I want to get a M.A. in History. Are there ANY good, reputable, accredited on-line programs? I've looked, but haven't found much.</p>
<p>Right now I am going to Western Governors University, and in 2012 I'll graduate with my B.A. in Social Science Secondary Education(with teachers certification). They don't offer a masters program in History though. I thought I wanted to be a high school history teacher which still sounds good, but I really think I'd like to eventually work in a museum or university, so I'd need a masters degree. I'd really like to go to Berkeley in California, but that just won't happen. I can't go to campus colleges because A. my husband is in the Army and we will be stationed in the middle of the desert FAR from any good school, and B. I will have 4 kids, and childcare is so expensive! We can't just move to a place so I can go to college.</p>
 

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I wouldn't trust an online Master's degree, especially one in the liberal arts/humanities, to be worth anything. Seriously, I don't think there are any reputable programs and I think you would be wasting your money.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
<p>Well crap! Going to campus is just not possible either... :(</p>
 

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<p>I don't have an definite suggestions, but I think the previous poster was a bit pessimistic.  I wouldn't trust a school that offers *only* online options, but there are many established colleges out there that now offer online options (or low-residency) for graduate programs.  Keep looking!</p>
 

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<p>Eh, my best friend is getting her masters in teaching from Western Governor's, and she's having a great experience.  She can't go to campus b/c she lives on an island and works in the school's there, her family is there (married with 2 setp kids), and so she can't just leave to go somewhere else for a few years.  I think that school has a good reputation, and I wouldn't worry about it.  I would NOT get a degree from a school that is not accredited, but as long as a school is accredited, you're good to go.</p>
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Super~Single~Mama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1287655/grad-schools#post_16142082"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>Eh, my best friend is getting her masters in teaching from Western Governor's, and she's having a great experience.  She can't go to campus b/c she lives on an island and works in the school's there, her family is there (married with 2 setp kids), and so she can't just leave to go somewhere else for a few years.  I think that school has a good reputation, and I wouldn't worry about it.  I would NOT get a degree from a school that is not accredited, but as long as a school is accredited, you're good to go.</p>
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<p><br>
Yes, I LOVE WGU as well, I just wish they had a MA in History. They have the Teaching one, but if I want to work in a museum I think a history masters might be better.</p>
 

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<p>I'm going to be the voice of evil reality here.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Having a terminal masters in History, from even the best colleges, means squat in today's economy.  It will not get you a job at a university or at a museum.  Most museums are looking for people with degrees in Museum Studies, and universities want folks with a PhD, or at the very least who are in a PhD program (who are ABD...All But Dissertation), and those folks will only be used for adjunct slave labor.  Academia is a brutal, ridiculous market, and humanities is the lowest rung.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Also, having a masters will not help you get a teaching job.  Teaching experience is much, much more important.  It will help you be a better teacher I think, so in that sense it is useful as a pedagogical tool, but nobody will care but you.  Really.  Oh, it might get you an additional small sum a year if you manage to land a teaching job.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I say this as a certified teacher with a masters in history from a really good school.  I say this as the wife of a recently minted PhD in history.  I've seen both sides of this craziness.  I have been trying to find a teaching job for two years and it took my husband four years to land the job he has now.  And he was one of the lucky ones.  To make a graduate degree work in today's world you have to be willing to move anywhere, and that is really hard to do with children.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I'm sorry to be the voice of suck.</p>
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Chamomile Girl</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1287655/grad-schools#post_16142122"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>I'm going to be the voice of evil reality here.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Having a terminal masters in History, from even the best colleges, means squat in today's economy.  It will not get you a job at a university or at a museum.  Most museums are looking for people with degrees in Museum Studies, and universities want folks with a PhD, or at the very least who are in a PhD program (who are ABD...All But Dissertation), and those folks will only be used for adjunct slave labor.  Academia is a brutal, ridiculous market, and humanities is the lowest rung.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Also, having a masters will not help you get a teaching job.  Teaching experience is much, much more important.  It will help you be a better teacher I think, so in that sense it is useful as a pedagogical tool, but nobody will care but you.  Really.  Oh, it might get you an additional small sum a year if you manage to land a teaching job.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I say this as a certified teacher with a masters in history from a really good school.  I say this as the wife of a recently minted PhD in history.  I've seen both sides of this craziness.  I have been trying to find a teaching job for two years and it took my husband four years to land the job he has now.  And he was one of the lucky ones.  To make a graduate degree work in today's world you have to be willing to move anywhere, and that is really hard to do with children.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I'm sorry to be the voice of suck.</p>
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<p><br>
Thanks for your honesty! It sucks that it's such a tough field, I LOVE history! Part of the reason I was thinking about starting my masters after I graduate is because I don't think I will be able to get a job at the time, and 6 months after I graduate I will have to start paying back student loans. If I don't have a job, I can't pay the loans! If I'm still a student I won't have to pay them yet... sad reason, but I want to eventually get it anyway.</p>
 

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<p><br>
 </p>
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>love4bob</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1287655/grad-schools#post_16142165"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Chamomile Girl</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1287655/grad-schools#post_16142122"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>I'm going to be the voice of evil reality here.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Having a terminal masters in History, from even the best colleges, means squat in today's economy.  It will not get you a job at a university or at a museum.  Most museums are looking for people with degrees in Museum Studies, and universities want folks with a PhD, or at the very least who are in a PhD program (who are ABD...All But Dissertation), and those folks will only be used for adjunct slave labor.  Academia is a brutal, ridiculous market, and humanities is the lowest rung.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Also, having a masters will not help you get a teaching job.  Teaching experience is much, much more important.  It will help you be a better teacher I think, so in that sense it is useful as a pedagogical tool, but nobody will care but you.  Really.  Oh, it might get you an additional small sum a year if you manage to land a teaching job.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I say this as a certified teacher with a masters in history from a really good school.  I say this as the wife of a recently minted PhD in history.  I've seen both sides of this craziness.  I have been trying to find a teaching job for two years and it took my husband four years to land the job he has now.  And he was one of the lucky ones.  To make a graduate degree work in today's world you have to be willing to move anywhere, and that is really hard to do with children.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I'm sorry to be the voice of suck.</p>
</div>
</div>
<p><br>
Thanks for your honesty! It sucks that it's such a tough field, I LOVE history! Part of the reason I was thinking about starting my masters after I graduate is because I don't think I will be able to get a job at the time, and 6 months after I graduate I will have to start paying back student loans. If I don't have a job, I can't pay the loans! If I'm still a student I won't have to pay them yet... sad reason, but I want to eventually get it anyway.</p>
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<p><br>
You can probably get an unemployment deferment for your loans, and if you get a teaching job at a public school your loans will be forgiven after ten years.  If you keep going to school because you love it...well I love history too, but I have 70K in student loans because of it (and am unemployed!) and I wouldn't wish that on anyone.</p>
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Chamomile Girl</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1287655/grad-schools#post_16142194"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p><br>
 </p>
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>love4bob</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1287655/grad-schools#post_16142165"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Chamomile Girl</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1287655/grad-schools#post_16142122"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>I'm going to be the voice of evil reality here.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Having a terminal masters in History, from even the best colleges, means squat in today's economy.  It will not get you a job at a university or at a museum.  Most museums are looking for people with degrees in Museum Studies, and universities want folks with a PhD, or at the very least who are in a PhD program (who are ABD...All But Dissertation), and those folks will only be used for adjunct slave labor.  Academia is a brutal, ridiculous market, and humanities is the lowest rung.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Also, having a masters will not help you get a teaching job.  Teaching experience is much, much more important.  It will help you be a better teacher I think, so in that sense it is useful as a pedagogical tool, but nobody will care but you.  Really.  Oh, it might get you an additional small sum a year if you manage to land a teaching job.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I say this as a certified teacher with a masters in history from a really good school.  I say this as the wife of a recently minted PhD in history.  I've seen both sides of this craziness.  I have been trying to find a teaching job for two years and it took my husband four years to land the job he has now.  And he was one of the lucky ones.  To make a graduate degree work in today's world you have to be willing to move anywhere, and that is really hard to do with children.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I'm sorry to be the voice of suck.</p>
</div>
</div>
<p><br>
Thanks for your honesty! It sucks that it's such a tough field, I LOVE history! Part of the reason I was thinking about starting my masters after I graduate is because I don't think I will be able to get a job at the time, and 6 months after I graduate I will have to start paying back student loans. If I don't have a job, I can't pay the loans! If I'm still a student I won't have to pay them yet... sad reason, but I want to eventually get it anyway.</p>
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<p><br>
You can probably get an unemployment deferment for your loans, <strong>and if you get a teaching job at a public school your loans will be forgiven after ten years</strong>.  If you keep going to school because you love it...well I love history too, but I have 70K in student loans because of it (and am unemployed!) and I wouldn't wish that on anyone.</p>
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<p><br>
What's that about my loans being forgiven after ten years? I've never heard that, how does it work? I'm pretty sure I'd have them paid off by then anyway though.... they aren't too monsterous.</p>
 

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<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>love4bob</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1287655/grad-schools#post_16142276"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Chamomile Girl</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1287655/grad-schools#post_16142194"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p><br>
 </p>
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>love4bob</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1287655/grad-schools#post_16142165"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Chamomile Girl</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1287655/grad-schools#post_16142122"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>I'm going to be the voice of evil reality here.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Having a terminal masters in History, from even the best colleges, means squat in today's economy.  It will not get you a job at a university or at a museum.  Most museums are looking for people with degrees in Museum Studies, and universities want folks with a PhD, or at the very least who are in a PhD program (who are ABD...All But Dissertation), and those folks will only be used for adjunct slave labor.  Academia is a brutal, ridiculous market, and humanities is the lowest rung.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Also, having a masters will not help you get a teaching job.  Teaching experience is much, much more important.  It will help you be a better teacher I think, so in that sense it is useful as a pedagogical tool, but nobody will care but you.  Really.  Oh, it might get you an additional small sum a year if you manage to land a teaching job.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I say this as a certified teacher with a masters in history from a really good school.  I say this as the wife of a recently minted PhD in history.  I've seen both sides of this craziness.  I have been trying to find a teaching job for two years and it took my husband four years to land the job he has now.  And he was one of the lucky ones.  To make a graduate degree work in today's world you have to be willing to move anywhere, and that is really hard to do with children.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I'm sorry to be the voice of suck.</p>
</div>
</div>
<p><br>
Thanks for your honesty! It sucks that it's such a tough field, I LOVE history! Part of the reason I was thinking about starting my masters after I graduate is because I don't think I will be able to get a job at the time, and 6 months after I graduate I will have to start paying back student loans. If I don't have a job, I can't pay the loans! If I'm still a student I won't have to pay them yet... sad reason, but I want to eventually get it anyway.</p>
</div>
</div>
<p><br>
You can probably get an unemployment deferment for your loans, <strong>and if you get a teaching job at a public school your loans will be forgiven after ten years</strong>.  If you keep going to school because you love it...well I love history too, but I have 70K in student loans because of it (and am unemployed!) and I wouldn't wish that on anyone.</p>
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<p><br>
What's that about my loans being forgiven after ten years? I've never heard that, how does it work? I'm pretty sure I'd have them paid off by then anyway though.... they aren't too monsterous.</p>
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<p><a href="http://www.finaid.org/loans/publicservice.phtml" target="_blank">http://www.finaid.org/loans/publicservice.phtml</a><br>
 </p>
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
<p>Thanks!</p>
 

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<p>I'm in the middle of a PhD program (in Classics, not that far off from History) right now and worked on my teacher's license while on maternity leave.  Truthfully, the teacher certification is much more likely to help me earn a living.  Extra education will add a little to my salary, but each step doesn't add all that much.  Going from MA +45 hours to PhD will result in approximately $0.50 more per pay period.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Regardless of whether you pursue another degree or not, have you considered getting an endorsement in a second (or third or fourth) area?  Not sure what your state's requirements are, but here I'm able to add additional endorsements either through demonstrating completion of a certain number of course credits or passing an exam.  It might make it easier to get hired or to get to full time if a place has a few part-time positions.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>As for museum work, I agree with the PP who mentioned the Museum Studies degree if that's what you want to do.  Another way to possibly get into that might be to start with some volunteer work.  That would also be a good way to feel out what specifically you might want to do there.</p>
 
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