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Discussion Starter #1
<p>If the story is in the simple past, and the style is conversational, which one is correct:</p>
<p> </p>
<p>1.  Anyone ever brought <i>him</i> cookies and milk? (the character to himself, musing about himself)</p>
<p> </p>
<div>2.  Anyone ever bring <i>him</i> cookies and milk?</div>
<div> </div>
<div>And if neither, what would correct?</div>
<div> </div>
<div>Thanks!</div>
 

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<p>I'm a little out on a limb here, since I can't really tell a participle from a pluperfect; so please forgive me if I'm not being at all helpful.  I think the examples above are fragments missing the verb and could or should (?) read:</p>
<p> </p>
<p>*Had* anyone ever brought him (or me) cookies and milk?</p>
<p> </p>
<p>or,</p>
<p> </p>
<p>*Did (would, could, should)* anyone ever bring him (or me) cookies and milk?</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Sorry, I'm not understanding why "him" is in italics--so again, maybe I have no business replying?  Although I believe that using me/him interchangeably is fine, given that him is himself, which is reflexive, as in, me, myself, he, himself, etc.  Also, my italics/bold/underline options get stuck when I select them, that's why I used asterisks to highlight the above.  I hope that might make some kind of sense in a helpful way.</p>
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<p>I hope you find what you need!</p>
 

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<p>I would say neither of those sound grammatically correct. </p>
<p> </p>
<p>"Has anyone ever brought him cookies and milk?" sounds better to me.</p>
 

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You need you when of them there auxiliary verbs.<br><br>
(Spoken as such to poke fun at my own, useless English degree.)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
<p>Thanks! I think I vaguely understand what you mean. It would be "him" because it is third person point of view. <em>Him</em> is in italics because he's comparing himself to someone else, someone who does get cookies and milk, while he (the character) doesn't. So he complains about this, and points out that no one ever brings <em>him</em> and milk.<br>
 </p>
<p>Now, to my vague understanding. I feel that the first choice sounds better, but English is not my first language, and I can't really trust my ear. And I'm stuck on the grammar aspect of it, so I can't really decide which one would be correct.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I wonder if I rephrase into: Noone ever brought <em>him</em> cookies and milk!</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Would that work?</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Thanks!!<br>
 </p>
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>annalivia</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1283729/grammar-question#post_16095668"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border-bottom:0px solid;border-left:0px solid;border-top:0px solid;border-right:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>I'm a little out on a limb here, since I can't really tell a participle from a pluperfect; so please forgive me if I'm not being at all helpful.  I think the examples above are fragments missing the verb and could or should (?) read:</p>
<p> </p>
<p>*Had* anyone ever brought him (or me) cookies and milk?</p>
<p> </p>
<p>or,</p>
<p> </p>
<p>*Did (would, could, should)* anyone ever bring him (or me) cookies and milk?</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Sorry, I'm not understanding why "him" is in italics--so again, maybe I have no business replying?  Although I believe that using me/him interchangeably is fine, given that him is himself, which is reflexive, as in, me, myself, he, himself, etc.  Also, my italics/bold/underline options get stuck when I select them, that's why I used asterisks to highlight the above.  I hope that might make some kind of sense in a helpful way.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I hope you find what you need!</p>
</div>
</div>
<br><br>
 

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Discussion Starter #6
<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Ms. Sisko</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1283729/grammar-question#post_16095711"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br>
You need you when of them there auxiliary verbs.<br><br>
(Spoken as such to poke fun at my own, useless English degree.)</div>
</div>
<br><br><p> </p>
 

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Discussion Starter #7
<p>This is that same sentence in context:</p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12pt;"><span style="font-family:verdana, sans-serif;"><span style="font-family:verdana;">Every year he put up with an ugly scarf, tolerated snowballs with a placid smile, and not an iota of appreciation! Anyone ever brought <em>him</em> cookies and milk? All he got was the pesky jingle.</span></span></span></p>
 

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<p><br><br>
 </p>
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>midnightwriter</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1283729/grammar-question#post_16095726"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border-bottom:0px solid;border-left:0px solid;border-top:0px solid;border-right:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>This is that same sentence in context:</p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12pt;"><span style="font-family:verdana, sans-serif;"><span style="font-family:verdana;">Every year he put up with an ugly scarf, tolerated snowballs with a placid smile, and not an iota of appreciation! Anyone ever brought <em>him</em> cookies and milk? All he got was the pesky jingle.</span></span></span></p>
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<p><br><br>
I think it should be bring.</p>
 

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<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Eeyore35</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1283729/grammar-question#post_16095734"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p><br><br>
 </p>
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>midnightwriter</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1283729/grammar-question#post_16095726"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border-bottom:0px solid;border-left:0px solid;border-top:0px solid;border-right:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>This is that same sentence in context:</p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="font-size:12pt;"><span style="font-family:verdana, sans-serif;"><span style="font-family:verdana;">Every year he put up with an ugly scarf, tolerated snowballs with a placid smile, and not an iota of appreciation! Anyone ever brought <em>him</em> cookies and milk? All he got was the pesky jingle.</span></span></span></p>
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<p><br><br>
I think it should be bring.</p>
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<p>Or, *Had* anyone ever brought him cookies and milk?; *Did* anyone ever bring him cookies and milk?  To my ear, the second choice sounds better, but I"m an incomplete English Major with a less than complete grasp of the whys and wherefores of grammar.  Just a fair to middling sense by ear.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>(As a complete aside, and since you mention that English isn't your first language, I'm having a really hard time typing "cookies and milk" in that order, because my brain automatically transposes it to "milk and cookies," it's a more familiar cadence to me.)</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I hope some of this is helping!<br>
 </p>
 

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I think the rephrase " No one ever brought him cookies and milk" works best in that context. Even if you add the "Had anyone ever brought him cookies and milk?" it doesn't quite match the flow of the surrounding sentences, which confuses the reader.<br><br>
The original "Anyone ever brought him cookies and milk?" I think would only be acceptable as a quote in a dialogue or monologue, and then it would be an example of colloquialism- a particular pattern of speech that is representative of how your character speaks, not proper grammar.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
<p>Thanks! I think I will go with the No one brought him...</p>
<p> </p>
<p>And "milk and cookies"? Really? That's neat! Thanks. To me the sentence rhythm sounds better with cookies and milk, but I had no idea it was an expression. Good to know!</p>
<p> </p>
<p>ETA: So I googled "what to leave for Santa" and some people say "cookies and milk" and some say "milk and cookies" (and some say brandy <span><img alt="lol.gif" src="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="width:15px;height:31px;"></span>). I wonder if the expression is regional? Any thoughts on that? I'm curious now.</p>
 

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<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>midnightwriter</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1283729/grammar-question#post_16095821"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>Thanks! I think I will go with the No one brought him...</p>
<p> </p>
<p>And "milk and cookies"? Really? That's neat! Thanks. To me the sentence rhythm sounds better with cookies and milk, but I had no idea it was an expression. Good to know!</p>
<p> </p>
<p>ETA: So I googled "what to leave for Santa" and some people say "cookies and milk" and some say "milk and cookies" (and some say brandy <span><img alt="lol.gif" src="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="width:15px;height:31px;"></span>). I wonder if the expression is regional? Any thoughts on that? I'm curious now.</p>
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<p><br>
Boy, I don't know.  As for regional data, I grew up in Michigan, mostly (about 24 years), and now I live in the PNW.  The only "people" I have available for an informal poll at the moment are cats, so I don't think that's helpful.  It might just be my sense of rhythm/assonance, to have milk first, single syllable, followed by cookies with two syllables.  Dunno.  Brandy sounds nice, though, right about now.</p>
 

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<p>Just realized, too, that for me, it might be an association with the phrase, "Land of (flowing with) milk and honey," since I come from some rather biblically oriented folks.  Maybe that's just how the phrase is set up in my head from reading eighteenth and nineteenth century literature/exposure to biblical maxims.</p>
 
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