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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
*<br><br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.americanvalues.org/html/hardwired.html" target="_blank">http://www.americanvalues.org/html/hardwired.html</a><br><br>
Brief quotes from article:<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">The Commission on Children at Risk, a panel of leading children's doctors, research scientists and youth service professionals, has issued a report to the nation about new strategies to reduce the currently high numbers of U.S. children who are suffering from emotional and behavioral problems such as depression, anxiety, attention deficit, conduct disorders, and thoughts of suicide. The Commission is basing its recommendations on recent scientific findings suggesting that children are biologically ``hardwired" for enduring attachments to other people and for moral and spiritual meaning. Meeting children's needs for enduring attachments and for moral and spiritual meaning is the best way to ensure their healthy development, according to the Commission's report.</td>
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More:<br><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">The old ``nature versus nurture" debate – focusing on whether heredity or environment is the main determinant of human conduct – is no longer relevant to serious discussions of child well-being and youth programming. New scientific findings are teaching us to marvel at how nature and nurture interact. These findings suggest that strong nurturing can reduce or eliminate the harmful effects of genes that are associated with aggression, anxiety, depression or substance abuse.</td>
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Check it out.
 

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I never thought I'd read something so relevant to my life on that particular website. Or relevant to my life at all, for that matter. That's pretty cool.<br><br>
 

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Thank you for posting this, mamaduck.<br><br>
It gives me great hope that there is alot of science backing up the founding principles of attachment parenting. It is my sincerest wish and hope that certain concepts of parenting, such as spanking and CIO, will one day be seen for the abusive and ignorant practices that they are. Much as we now look back on corporal punishment in public schools as a thing of the past.<br><br>
Articles like this give me hope!
 

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I must have missed something. All I got from this article was that my child should be connected to some church. Maybe I'll read it again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
eilonwy -- I've never visited that site before. Is it not a good place? I dunno. My dh sent me the link to this article because he thought I'd like it. There was actually an editorial about it on the Yahoo News page -- and he linked to the study from there. I didn't even glance at the rest of the site.<br><br>
parismaman -- You know, I really liked the first part of the paper the best! About attachment. Also, I read that seeing "meaning" in life was the primary focus of the 2nd part -- and religion was interpreted as one way to acheive that. Myself, I can think of a more ways than that to find meaning in life.<br><br>
I do think that we (as a culture) tend to overlook children's spiritual needs. Somewher in the article it said something about seeing children as an end in themselves. Meaning, I think, that children are whole people with human needs *as children* and not just as potential adults. Children need to find meaning life as much as anyone.<br><br>
I did think the focused a lot on the need for community centers and programs -- as the conclusion for this research. I feel skeptical about that. Obviously, it wouldn't be a bad thing and couldn't hurt. But the article began by focusing on "long term attachment relationships." I just really wonder how many relationships between staff and children at community centers are longterm. I wish the article had placed more of an emphasis on AP in the early years.<br><br>
I also thought it was interesting to read the characteristics of an "authoritarian community." It read an awful lot like the community that extended families provided to children in the past. I wonder if that sort of environment can actually be recreated by community centers and churches? Maybe?<br><br>
Overall, I found the article interesting and I'm glad there is research empahsizing a child's need for connectedness and meaning in life. My gut reactions is "well, yeah, duh..." But at the same time I'm so glad that it is being articulated *because* these needs in our culture are so great.<br><br>
Sorry for rambling.....
 

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I didn't look at the rest of the site, but I have to admit that the title makes me think of right-wing "family values" type groups. And the article probably could have been taken as a justification for promotion of churches, I suppose. But I took out of it what mamaduck did, which is to say that it started me thinking about the role of spirituality in a biological sense. After all, most cultures on earth have some sort of mythology and belief system, so that seems to be an inherent part of being human. But I often ask myself why, from a biological perspective, such a trait exists. I began to wonder if being raised in an environment that promotes spirituality (which I think can come from a variety of places and not just organized religion) allows one to feel more secure as a person because it helps us further define our "place" in the grand scheme of things. As social creatures I believe that being able to define ourselves like that does help with emotional health. I just never put it together with spirituality. It's relevent for me personally right now, as DH and I are considering establishing some such environment for our family (i.e. joining a spiritual community).<br><br>
I also wished the article had focussed more on attachment and babies/infants. But I think many of the principles they talked about naturally fits into an AP-type philosophy and that's why I felt hopeful reading the article. I agree it's kind of a big "duh!" but better that it's out there, right? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Mamaduck,<br><br>
Thank you for the post and link. Indeed, my gut tells me, "yeah duh" but I admit, (probably due to the issues I have born out of childhood and the parenting I received or didn't receive), the validation of such a study somehow boosts my own gut feeling and my spirits so to speak. Not to mention, the vast amount of people (parents and children alike) who do not share my own progession of thought on the matter... I'm never so saddened but for on those days where I am once again faced with the realization that I'm in the minority with regard to my parenting philospohy. Oh don't get me started... suffice to say... thanks again.<br><br>
Em
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;"><i>Originally posted by mamaduck</i><br><b>eilonwy -- I've never visited that site before. Is it not a good place? I dunno. My dh sent me the link to this article because he thought I'd like it. There was actually an editorial about it on the Yahoo News page -- and he linked to the study from there. I didn't even glance at the rest of the site.<br></b></td>
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I first discovered this site when I was doing research on the legal ramifications of common-law marriage. It is <i><b>exceptionally</b></i> right-wing. Reactionary, even. I'm not saying that this is a bad thing, only that it's not *my* thing. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> Most of the time, I think of myself as a fairly moderate liberal, but when I read pages like that my views seem ultra-liberal by comparison. :LOL Like I said, it's not me, but hey, some of my best friends are conservatives... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/ROTFLMAO.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="rotflmao"> :LOL
 
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