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Do you think the book is age appropriate? She's generally very advanced verbally, and not especially fearful. She saw Bridge to Terabithia in the theater and wasn't scared or upset, and loves movies with a bit of a scary edge, though she'll turn it off for a few minutes if it gets too intense. I don't think it would be too much for her, but does anyone have an experience where they though it would be OK but turned out to be too scary?<br><br>
TIA!
 

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We read the first book when dd was not quite four and she's seen all the movies. I think the books are great for that age!
 

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My kids all love them (6, 5, 2.5). There are a couple of parts they consider scary, and they just close their eyes.
 

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Uh, no<br><br>
I introduced DD1 to HP when she was 3 and DD2 at age 2, I read the books to them, DD1 is reading them by herself know though and she's 5.<br><br>
They love it, Harry Potter fans all the way.<br><br>
I take them to see GOF when it came out DD1 was 4, she loved it, she didn't even turned away with Voldemort, I thought it will scare her but no, she was ok.<br><br>
Enjoy introducing your daughter to the HP world!!
 

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Sorry, apparently I'm in the minority but (in general) I go by the age of the narrator/main character of the books.<br><br>
I like HP also, have read/seen all the books/movies and these wouldn't be appropriate for my kids now (I have a 7yo and a 4yo).<br>
We are media free, and I don't plan on introducing her to Harry Potter until she is the age of Harry in the first book--who was turning 11.
 

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No, I don't think so. There are some majorly scary parts to the books. Ditto for the films. I don't think a child this age can really process this kind of info.
 

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We love HP here... ds 6 and dd 4 are huge fans... while they dont process or understand the entire story line, they arent reading for a literary discussion. they are reading for fun....<br>
We also love the Series of Unfortunate Events
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>melamama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8122458"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Sorry, apparently I'm in the minority but (in general) I go by the age of the narrator/main character of the books.<br><br>
I like HP also, have read/seen all the books/movies and these wouldn't be appropriate for my kids now (I have a 7yo and a 4yo).<br>
We are media free, and I don't plan on introducing her to Harry Potter until she is the age of Harry in the first book--who was turning 11.</div>
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Media free? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/headscratch.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="headscratch"> Do you not read books either?<br><br>
11 these days is pretty mature for waiting on the HP books. By the time I was 12 I was reading Anne Rice and Stephen King, so Harry Potter seems practically infantile in comparison.<br><br><br>
My 4.75 yo doesn't really care about HP, but has been exposed. I won't do the later books yet, but the earlier ones are not a problem. He ignores the movies completely for some reason, though we have watched all of them while he was around. He prefers Star Wars, I guess. He likes to pretend to be Harry Potter, sometimes, however, and he likes to go to the book release parties. I can't wait for this summer. Our local book store has a sorting hat.
 

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Are you talking about the books or the movies?<br><br>
I think that the books, if read aloud, could be appropriate if you edit some of the scarier scenes. The movies are wholly innapropriate for most 4yos. I wouldn't let any child under 13 or so see the movie without having read the book first.<br><br>
I disagree about not letting a child read the books before age 11. I think it would be so cool to be 8,9, or 10 and read Harry Potter and wonder if they're going to get a letter from Hogwarts when they turn 11. DD2 just turned 11 and this is a common topic of conversation around our house! Will she or won't she get an owl from Hogwarts this August? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>melamama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8122458"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">, and I don't plan on introducing her to Harry Potter until she is the age of Harry in the first book--who was turning 11.</div>
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Somewhere I read that most books have kids who are OLDER than the intended readers -- so a book about 10 year olds is intended for kids about 8 or so.<br><br>
I have no problem with my kids reading Harry Potter after about age 7 - when they've got a firmer grasp on fantasy/reality thinking. But both my kids are sensitive, so I might try to shield them from the scary stuff for a little longer than that. The movies on the other hand.... I don't know when I'll think they're old enough, but probably not until 9 or older.
 

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Hmmm... this is interesting to me because to me the books, where everything is limited, or rather, limitless due to one's imagination, seem scarier than movies with concrete limits. My 4 yo is pretty fearless in general, however, and movies are pure fun to him.
 

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Both dds (4 and 8) love the books and movies. They like watching scary things-just not right before bed. I agree that the books can be waaaay scarier. I remember being in jr high reading Stephen King late at night and being delightfully terrified!<br><br>
I do think that starting off reading the books is a great idea. We did that and now dd8 reads them herself.<br><br>
It all comes down to what you think your child can handle. Some are real sensitive and it wouldn't work. Mine love it.
 

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My son (5 in August) loves harry potter.<br>
We watch it as a family. But, if your child is sensitive or gets scared easy then it may not be the best book or movie.
 

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The movie would have been inappropriate for my kids at that age.<br><br>
The book, if you're reading it out loud, you'd need to make that decision yourself. I would not read it to a 4 year old.<br><br>
As the character grows, the books get scarier and so do the movies.
 

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I guess it depends on what you are comfortable with and of course, your child. Having said that, I've read the first three books twice to my son. He's six- we started just before he turned 5. My almost 4 year old can't wait, but he's definitely not ready. I've tried to hold off a bit for the fourth one, just because the characters are getting older and the books are definitely maturing as they go along, but we just started it a few days ago. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"><br><br>
He LOVES them. After reading the book we watch the movie. He compares and contrasts. He enjoys watching the movies, but he enjoys the books far more. He remembers exact quotes from the books and chapter titles. There are many little chunks of wisdom in the books as well that often come up in everyday life. As far as scary goes- well, this is the kid that refuses to watch Finding Nemo. He saw it once and hated it because he thought it was too scary. He also didn't want to continue reading the Hobbit once Gollum came into the picture (we'll return to that when he's older). I think the context is everything for him.<br><br>
I do limit media with my children- they are sheltered in many ways (I can't tell you how many of his peers have seen the Spiderman movies, which we will wait a long long <b><i>long</i></b> time for that), but at the same time my son understands the world in a way that many kids his age don't. He loves the sarcasm and dry humor as well.
 

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The movies and books are more appreciated by the older child, about 9 & up.<br><br>
Oh, I know lots of younger children enjoy them, but Rowlings deals with many things preteens, teens and aduylts think about in ways that small children do not.<br><br>
I would not forbid or censor, but as a HP fan from way back...before any movie, there is delight to be found in these pages that younger children would miss.<br><br>
There are so many great books for younger kids, ones that have great storylines and have ideas that the younger child relates to well, or thinks about.<br><br>
Parental death, good Vs evil, etc are heavy burdens in HP and some of the bigger life questions and symbolism of all that is lost on the small child, imo.<br><br>
So, while they can enjoy the movies, they may not 'get it' all. (And don;t jump all over me, I understand there are gifted 5 yr olds who get it all).<br><br>
I think Artemis Fowl might be more for the younger child interested in magic and such-- the theme is less complicated, there are fewer characters to keep track of, the images are less intense, the symbolism and such, not as great. There is even farting humor.<br><br>
ETA--Oh, this is only a question about the movie...Well, we own them all, and my 8 yr old leaves the room whenever her sibs put them on. She's smart, but she doesn't care for the edgy darkness right now.<br><br>
I am looking forward to reading the books to her (or her reading them to herself), before I would encourgage the movies. The movies aren't better than any of the books, in our family's opinion. That's always a dissapointment. Anyway, once you see a movie about a book, you can never form your own images of what you're reading. That can be a huge loss).
 

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We're listening to the 1st on tape. It's awesome. THe kids (4 & 6) love it. And, it gives us a lot to discuss. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"><br><br>
I'd say it's on a kid per kid basis.
 

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I think the first in the series is fine for a 5-yr-old, but the temptation is to jump right into the next one as soon as you finish the first. Harry ages a year in each book, and his experiences are more intense, so the 3rd or 4th book might not be appropriate for a 5-yr-old.<br><br>
I highly recommend reading the books yourself, then deciding if you feel your dd can handle it. I have read and re-read them all, and will probably start from the beginning again before the next one comes out. Since each book builds on the ones before, I enjoyed looking for clues to upcoming events as I re-read the series.
 

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I agree that the first is not too intense for a not-too-fearful four-year-old. Some of the later books I wouldn't spring on a kid younger than eight or so. However, you might find that it's kind of BORING for a four-year-old; it takes Sorceror's/Philosopher's Stone a while to get going.
 
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