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Brandon's IFSP review is tomorrow and since the chances of him being able to get into OT again before he turns 3 is pretty small, I want to have a battery of options available to add to his IFSP for home therapy. (He has SID, modulation delays, social/behavior delays, and will be evaluated for asperger's/high functioning autism at the end of October). One thing I've heard great things about for kids with social delays is the Floortime model, but before I shell out the 2 zillion dollars for the program, does anyone actually have experience using it? Does it work? I have a background as an ABA specialist for a residential school (the school was for people who had low functioning/severe autism), so am I better off just using ABA, or does this Floortime work well?
 

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I think it depends on the child. I wasn't terribly impressed with the "Floortime" programs they were doing with DD back before she turned 3 and switched to preschool. One part of it was that the therapists may not have been very well trained. When we did the parent training component I kind of felt like it was a waste of time because they were just telling us to do stuff that we were already doing and had always seemed to us like the natural way of interacting with DD.

But maybe that type of tactic would speak more to some kids' needs and just wasn't what we needed. There was a little boy in DD's preschool class who I was surprised to learn had an ASD diagnosis. I talked to his mom to find out what she was doing differently and she said she had studied up on her own on Floortime (without taking one of the expensive seminars) and credited her son's progress to it. He was still language delayed but definitely one of the most social kids I've seen in an ASD classroom.

DD is getting supplemental behavioral therapy in addition to her preschool time; it's a sort of a hybrid ABA approach. They incorporate ABA into play routines rather than doing repetitive drills at a table, and DD thinks it's loads of fun. She learns more that way than with the less structured Floortime approach. So for her, I think something like that is the most appropriate. I may also look into RDI at some point in the future, at least through reading some of the books about it, since that approach sounds like it might help with DD's social delays.
 

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We did floortime w/DS for a few years before switching to RDI. DH and I have too many philosophical problems with ABA to go down that road. We really believe in the play-based teaching models. As the PP said, it's a natural way of interacting with your child, so it fits well with AP lifestyles. The parent training in floortime is a waste of time if you already spend most of your day on the floor playing with your child. Unfortunately, most parents do not prioritize play.

Floortime does not cost much, if anything, unless you hire a therapist to do it for you. Dr. Stanley Greenspan recently published a new book, "Engaging Autism," which goes into lengthy detail about the floortime method, and the appendix has a copy of his study with long-term outcomes for autistic children who stuck with floortime. His older book, "The Child With special Needs," also describes the floortime model, and most public libraries have a copy of it available. In addition, you can look at www.floortime.org for more information.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm very curious about this RDI now....does that work well for SID kids?
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by AllyRae
I'm very curious about this RDI now....does that work well for SIDS kids?
I can't say for sure. I think there is someone who posts on this board sometimes who is an RDI therapist (that was why I started looking into it) so maybe she can give more info, but this is the book DD's OT recommended to me and which looked helpful. I thumbed through it, haven't bought it yet, but it has a lot of play activities that are supposed to expand social skills:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/184...e=UTF8&s=books
 

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We are contemplating taking parent training in Floor Time..it's big here in Atlanta and the pediatrician that evaluated Eli for ASD highly recommended it. I got the book Engaging Autism by Dr. Stanley Greenspan and there are lots of great ideas in there to help us get started.

The program is really good for kids like Eli who play a lot and are happy to allow a person to enter the play with them. It's working nicely at home w/o any training so far. Of course, there are many trained therapists here in atlanta who do this program so hopefully we can progress with it as soon as we come up with some funds.

I did notice that once we move to florida, virtually no one does floor time so we definitely need the parent training before we go so that we can get it started and so forth before we go. At that point since we'll live near UF, I am hoping to find some college girls that I can train to use the model to play with Elijah. Floor time really needs at least 20 hours of dedicated time to work effectively, according to all I've read so far. And they recommend using the floor time techniques almost all the time if you can.
 

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I LOVE Stanley Greenspan!!!

Myself, I ordered the first set of floortime training videos. They are available here. The first set is only around $80.00. I figure I'll try it and go from there. If I am encouraged by the results, I'll buy the comprehensive set for $200.00. This is just a fraction of what you'd pay a professional, and it's the primary caretaker's interactions that matter most. Why not train myself rather than paying someone else to train me?

http://orders.balmar.com/store/entra...p?CompanyID=33
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by AllyRae
I'm very curious about this RDI now....does that work well for SID kids?
Well, my DS has plenty of sensory issues as part of his autism dx, and I think RDI helps with it. Many of the exercises help with vestibular and proprioceptive issues, and almost all of the early stage exercises deal with listening and attentiveness. DH and I were attracted to RDI because it was the only play method we could find that specifically addressed our DS's severe anxiety. The main difference between RDI and Floortime is that RDI is parent-led, floortime is child-led (but innovations are gradually introduced by the adult). RDI also has a special emphasis on developing episodic memory (the integration of emotion and past experience to enable an individual to adapt to new situations), which seemed to be missing in floortime. The main difference between RDI and ABA is that the only positive reinforcer in RDI is the development of the parent-child relationship -- the shared excitement, the changing facial expressions, etc., in other words, all of the relationship skills that children are supposed to learn before their first birthday; and of course, RDI does not require a child to be seated at a desk for the exercises, because we're all over the room.
DH always says that ABA seeks to retrain the child, but RDI seeks to retrain the parent to interact in ways that support natural development. The RDI website, rdiconnect.com, is going to be completely redone by January -- right now it's rather difficult to navigate. The best way to learn about it is to join one of the RDI yahoo groups and start asking for ideas. The book "Relationship Development Intervention With Young Children" has plenty of hands-on ideas for getting started, too. Good luck!
 

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Honestly, if I had a child with an autistic spectrum disorder, I'd incorporate Floortime as an adjunct (for play breaks), but I wouldn't make it my main therapy. I think it has a LOT to offer, in terms of working on social skills, and I would try to get a consultation to know how to do it best. I would definitely do RDI; it's an awesome program that has tons of great research behind it, focuses relational skills and is more clearly delineated in terms of goals than Floortime. Plus, it is really easily integrated into daily life and totally parent driven. Since you have an ABA background, I would be tempted to use that also. (Can you tell I'm an eclectic?) I'd use ABA a few hours a day to work on building specific skills, largely self help and pre academic. But ABA is NOT how I would go for teaching language, play, or social skills. I'd definitely push for OT, but if that isn't an option, I'd push for Floortime and/ or RDI and add in some ABA work to build specific skills.
 
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