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Discussion Starter #1
That would be the level after the lettered A-E levels, but before their Videotext Algebra series? It looks like it's geometry based, which I think would be great for my son. All the reviews I reading about RightStart are for the lower levels, though, so I'm looking to hear experiences with the Intermediate Math Level. <a href="http://www.alabacus.com/pageView.cfm?pageID=296" target="_blank">http://www.alabacus.com/pageView.cfm?pageID=296</a> Anyone?
 

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We're using it and loving it! DS started level E at age 10, and (after doing Transitions of course) we took about a year and a half with it. Last Christmas he finished, and we started Geometry. He turns 12 next week.<br><br>
We're up to about lesson 30... we took a break for awhile about a month ago, because there were errors in our copy where the print size was off (making accurate measurements impossible!) They sent us a new copy, and we kind of got out of the habit in the meantime...<br><br>
Since you're 'supposed' to start algebra about midway through their geometry level, we figured we'd just start in then. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> We're using Teaching Textbooks pre-algebra, instead of VideoText, because we already had it on hand heh... We also use Life of Fred for reinforcement, extra practice, and fun!<br><br>
But I think we're going to get back into RS Geometry soon. DS is VERY much a visual-spatial learner and he loves loves loves to draw, so it's perfect for him. He actually enjoys his math lessons, and once or twice I even 'caught' him doing the next math lesson on his own when he was supposed to be going to bed!<br><br>
One word of warning -- we haven't hit this point yet, but I have heard from many users that later on in the book, their kids start having real difficulties and they think things aren't explained well enough. I don't know how common that is, but it is something I've seen mentioned more than once. With us, so far so good. There may be some imperfections since it's still quite new, but Dr Cotter has always been VERY receptive and responsive to suggestions and complaints etc about her books. She wants them to work! Imperfections notwithstanding, I think it's a FABULOUS approach, a wonderful way to draw (punny) middle schoolers into mathematics. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Thanks, tankgirl, that's very helpful. By the way, would you say that the little placement quiz they have was accurate for your son. According to it, ds1 should be in the intermediate level. He's only 9, but finishing up k12's 5th grade course and, if we were staying with k12, doing pre-algebra next, so it sounds like it's probably about right. I'm 99% sure I'm going to start my youngest in their A course in August, too (he's very much a visual-spatial learner, so it seems great for him.) I'm still trying to decide if I should transition dd to it, too.
 

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I find their placement test only so-so, because once you hit one item they don't know then BANG the test is over. Presumably though, you got all of them, if it says they should be in geometry. Doing all that at only age 9 he must be pretty mathematically gifted! How fun!<br><br>
I'd say it can't hurt to try it. We actually tried pre-algebra a couple years ago (which is why we had it on hand) because he had finished TT grade 6 and was keen to try it. But it was too much for him, he didn't have the basics strong enough and the course was too "dry" since it was written for an older audience. No harm, no foul -- we decided to shelve it until later and do something else. And now he's finding it a piece of cake and not dry at all.<br><br>
So if you do try Geometry and it's too advanced, then you can just put it away for a year or two and come back to it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
We've started level A with my daughter who's 3 and a half and seems mathematically gifted... very slowly, just a lesson every once in awhile, not on any regular schedule, but she really enjoys it. I'm a total RS convert now. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Yeah, I noticed that about the assessment. I was doing it for dd, and it stopped at not knowing times tables, but after that askes about subtracting 4 digit numbers, which is something she can do. But I figure if level C (which it says she should be in) is the one that really reinforces multiplication concepts, then it's probably the right level for her. If it's "too easy," I think the learning of a completely new system will be intersting and challenging enough.<br><br>
Yes, my oldest is very advanced in math. It's challenging, though, to find a curriculum that is at his academic level that is also interesting to him as a nine year old, you know? It's like you were saying about your child finding the pre-algebra too dry a couple of years ago. I kind of wonder if that might happen with my son if I get him the geometry. Some of it looks really fun, but I don't want to bog him down - especially if he sees dd and ds2 playing with all these bright colorful manipulatives. We're with a charter school that lets us choose our own curriculum. I don't think they have RightStart in their library, but if I can convince them it's something other families will want to use, they will buy it for us without using any of our extracurricular funds. So, I might be able to get them to buy all levels, and if they do, we could try them all out and see what he wants to do.
 
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