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Discussion Starter #1
Like in the case of a stolen wallet or something. DH's work reported that a computer with all the employees' social security numbers was stolen (yeah, whoops <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">: ). I believe these days that in the case of a stolen wallet or similar, you are supposed to call the national credit agencies and put some sort of fraud alert on your name and social, in case anyone tries to open any accounts, lines or credit, or anything similar with your number. But I'm not sure which agencies exactly to call or how to go about doing this.<br><br>
Anyone know? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"><br>
Hoping somone here has done this and can give me a pointer. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Okay, I just looked up the numbers and called and it was easy enough. You just need to call one and it notifies the others, supposedly. Though the message contradicted what I read online, and said that if you were a victim of fraud already (as opposed to just having your wallet or id or ss stolen) to leave it. Didn't get to talk to a human, so I'm assuming it worked. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/dizzy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Dizzy">:
 

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They all should send you a letter of confirmation that your name and ss# are on fraud alert. You can also get a copy of your credit report for free.
 

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Do you know if you are supposed to call just if your wallet is stolen (to prevent id theft with the info stolen) or just once fraud has already occurred on some level?<br><br>
Everywhere I read that you should do this if your wallet or personal info is stolen. But now I'm reading that you shouldn't unless you were a fraud victim already, though that doesn't seem to quite make much sense to me.
 

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When my wallet was stolen, the tief/thieves were using checks and cards within an hour (I didn't realize it for a couple hours). We had to file a police report, notify bank/cardholders and place the fraud alert. They financial institutions and credit reporting companies wanted copies of the police report. I would think they would file it for you if you provide a copy of the notification from your DH's company.
 

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There is a woman in Northern California who has over 85 people using her social security number. The only remedy she has been offered by the government is to issue her a new number. She has refused and has gone as far as to contact some of the people who are using her number and "politely" asked them to stop using her number and no one will.<br><br>
I have an Aunt who died fourteen years ago, and someone is using her social security number and identity. She would be 100 years old now, but for some reason, the government has not acted on this.<br><br>
When I worked as night auditor at Motel 6, our names and social security numbers were on display on our time cards in the staff lounge. Many of the regular workers had their numbers stolen and used elsewhere. This created headaches for them with the IRS and other places.<br><br>
I stay on top of things quite rigorously. I still have had to report problems, but so far, I have caught the problem as soon as it happens.
 

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We've been victims of fraud 2 or 3 times. The last time we had a fraud alert put on our credit report. The theory is that anytime someone tries to open an account using your social, the issuing company has to call your home number first to verify. This created a bit of a problem when dh and I were at Macys and tried to open a credit account to purchase a couch. Since we were at Macy's, no one was at home to answer the phone.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/dizzy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Dizzy">: However, since we had told the person up front that there was a fraud alert on our account, they believed us and opened the account. Not sure how I feel about that.<br><br>
In this day and age the only thing you can really do is to regularly check your credit reports. I am guilty of not doing this myself, but it would be a good idea.
 

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Hazel, I had to do this last year. I lost my wallet at the zoo, and by the time I realized it was gone (about 4 hours later) American Express called to ask if I had really meant to charge $6K worth of stuff at an online electronics site and about $5K more at a department store. Needless to say, I had to file a police report (major PITA), cancel everything, but also put on a fraud alert on my bureaus.<br><br>
It's very easy. One call to any one of the big 3 will get it put on all of them, though it will take a few days for it to show up on the ones you don't call. So I would advise calling all three. I believe experian has an online form, I think all 3 do, actually.<br><br>
It has the added benefit of putting a little dent in your CC solicitation junk mail. But it was very easy. If you google credit bureaus, then on all the websites it's pretty easy to find fraud alert information.
 
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