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Those of you who attempted a homebirth and transferred, do you regret trying for a homebirth in the first place? Why or why not?
 

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No way! I just regret my son not being able to find his way out. I will definitely try at home again in the future. I also regret the agony of the decision to transfer, because I so wanted a hb. And the hospital really wasn't that bad. They were very supportive of my wishes for a natural birth. I wish I could have more graciously accepted the help I needed without feeling so much guilt. It wasn't worth the agony.
 

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Nope. No regrets. Homebirth is great and my next will be planned at home too, but I think we all have to acknowledge that there are certain situations where being at the hospital isn't such a bad idea. At two weeks after his due date, my little guy's heart rate was showing he might not be handling contractions so well and my placenta was starting to show its age. We decided to stay at the hospital and let them break my water which of course canceled my plans for a homebirth. That was all the encouragement he needed and we had a great natural birth at the hospital. My older son was born at a birth center with no problems, but I feel my newborn was safest at the hospital. My next baby will probably be safely born at home, but if s/he needs a little extra help, I won't hesitate to transfer or feel badly that I tried a homebirth in the first place.
 

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Not for a moment. I had a lovely pregnancy without the stress and pressure that most women experience. I was just a happy pregnant woman, no tests, intrusions, nothing forced on me, no fretting over a due date, no crap about big babies or induction, went into labour spontaneously. The TF experience was horrific but it is now three and a half years ago and the gifts from it have been immense. I had a freebirth in July last year and I also set up and now run the Australian homebirth network because of my TF experience so hundreds of other women are benefitting from my TF. Sometimes I need to remind myself of that but what's to regret?
 

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Not at all. Hospitals are for when things are no longer normal. Things turned from normal to not normal in my birth. I am glad there was a hospital for this reason.
 

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No way. For me if there is ever a chance my baby could be born at home I am gonna jump on that chance. If it doesn't work out at least I tried. Every pg I know I might transfer but I still plan my hbs and they all worked out after my transfer. I transfered with my 2nd and went on to have 5 more at home.
 

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No way!! I was happily labouring at home for 22 hours or so, spent about 3 hours in hospital, and home again. I just see my hospy experience as just a pitstop along the way.. I had the wonderful support of my independant midwife at home and hospy, and she was amazing at advocating for me, so my wishes were respected.<br><br>
I had a lovely hb last year which went swimmingly, and am now planning a freebirth <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Definitely not! If I'd gone to the hospital when my water broke like an obedient little patient, I'd have had a cesarean. Instead, we had transition at home, in the dark and silence, on my own bed, with my husband curled behind me. I can't imagine doing that in the hospital. In the end we managed a vaginal birth without painkillers. We never would have had that if we hadn't started out at home.
 

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Trying? Not at all.<br><br>
I went on to have a successful HB with my second child.<br><br>
The only thing I regret with my first birth was attempting to UC. I had a very difficult labor, and I regret not having a MW present, because I think I likely would not have transferred if I had a MW.
 

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absolutely not. i was attempting a vbac and know if i'd been in the hospital from the start, i would have been cut open within the first day of labor. as it was, i was in labor for 48 hours, transferred at about 36 and had my son vaginally.<br>
our prenatal care was outstanding and i really felt supported and cared about through the entire pregnancy, birth and afterwards.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>JanetF</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7901983"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">what's to regret?</div>
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I don't know really. My main concern is an unforseeable shoulder dystocia resulting in brain damage or death. I sense that I would be more likely to prevent an SD at home by laboring more instinctively and in various positions than I would in the hospital. But the help available to me in the hospital would be more competent should an SD occur. I'm having a hard time deciding which is riskier for me personally--laboring in an environment where I feel inhibited (the hospital) or laboring in an environment where experienced help is not readily available in the event of a shoulder dystocia (home).
 

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Do you have a mw or are you ucing? If you have a mw I would trust a mw over an ob for sd. Seriously. OBs don't often know how nor would they do the gaskin maneouver. If you are ucing would read up as much as possible on sd and what you would do. If its something you would consider birthing in a hospital for you should still research it since its more likely to happen there (directed pushing, lithomy position etc). Def know what things to avoid.<br><br>
I don't know where you are either but like here the mws are trained in nnr and carry o2 so should they have to resusitate they can. They can also call 911 as soon as it looks like there is a problem. I don't necessarily think that drs and hospital are any more equiped to deal with sd.
 

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Nope. I kind of regret that I didn't have a more experienced midwife, so that perhaps I wouldn't have to have transferred and had a cesarean, but I don't regreat the homebirth, and am planning my 2nd attempt at a homebirth now. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Not my story, but a local mom who I know. She attempted a homebirth, but ended up with a footling breech which required a Cesarean section delivery.<br><br>
In her words:<br><br><a href="http://hypnobirthinglasvegas.com/announce.html" target="_blank">http://hypnobirthinglasvegas.com/announce.html</a>
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Munchkimo</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7908232"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">But the help available to me in the hospital would be more competent should an SD occur.</div>
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If you have a competent midwife (or are able to maintain your head, and preferably have a helper, with a UC), this is not true. What do you think OBs can do that midwives can't when it comes to shoulder dystocia? The only things that would be available at a hospital that aren't at home are surgery (cesarean section, which is useless in a shoulder dystocia anyway) and drugs (which don't help with a true mechanically stuck baby). I would say midwives are BETTER able to deal with shoulder dystocia, not only because it is much less likely to happen at home, with a hands-off birth, and physiologically appropriate positioning, but because midwives have more "tricks" up their sleeves to deal with it - position changes (Gaskin's maneuver), etc. And as someone else pointed out, midwives do generally carry oxygen for after, and a midwife is MUCH less likely to take the baby away from its mother, with whom the baby needs to be after birth, much <i>more</i> so if there were difficulties or traumas with the birth. (Being on the mother helps babies pink up faster, stay warmer, breathe sooner and better, etc.)
 

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No way, I don't regret trying. Had I been in the hospital any earlier I definitely would have had pitocin and probably a c-section. As it was I got to the hospital at 12:30 (stalled labour) and my daughter was born at 4pm. I begged for the epi, but by the time they showed up with it I was 9cm and declined. Got my midwife attended, natural birth, in the hospital.<br><br>
Next time I'll aim for a hb, if I get transferred no biggie IMO. The longer you stay home the better!
 

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So would it be helpful to this discussion to have a new term for what happens after transport?<br><br>
Would it be helpful to know your midwife's rate of vaginal birth after transport (VBAT)?
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Munchkimo</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7898578"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Those of you who attempted a homebirth and transferred, do you regret trying for a homebirth in the first place? Why or why not?</div>
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Every birth in the hospital begins at home, therefore every hospital birth is a transfer. That's how I see it. If you complete the birth at home, fantastic. If you don't, then you went to where it could get done. I don't think anyone should "feel bad" about where they started and where they finished. You make plans, make back up plans, and do what you need to do. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mothercat</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7914794"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Would it be helpful to know your midwife's rate of vaginal birth after transport (VBAT)?</div>
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What does that matter? This is the mother's rate, not the midwife's rate isn't it?
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">But the help available to me in the hospital would be more competent should an SD occur.</td>
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Personally, I would <i>never</i> assume that to be the case.
 
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