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I used a website for ideas and then tried to make some pantiliners. I use a lot of pantiliners and figured reusable would save money and the environment but....they ride up.<br><br>
Do I need to make wings on them?<br><br>
Can anyone suggest a site with directions for a sewer with beginner skills?<br><br>
I used 100% cotton flannel and 100% cotton batting for them.<br><br>
Any advice would be appreciated. Eventually I'd like to make ones for AF as well but I figured I'd start with just pantiliners and see how it goes.<br><br>
Thanks,<br>
T
 

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<a href="http://www.snoogiesnaps.com/MakePads.htm" target="_blank">http://www.snoogiesnaps.com/MakePads.htm</a><br><br>
Check out this site, they have nice looking stuff, and I don't think you need to be a master sewer to do a decent job at it. I would definitely use snaps or something like that to hold them in place, maybe even a little velcro.<br><br>
I haven't made any pads yet, but I plan to one of these days when I'm finished making diapers for my baby, that keeps me busy for now!
 

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I added wings to mine and just pin them with a diaper pin. I'm kinda lazy :p I wouldn't' personally do velcro because the idea of that scratching against my inner thigh gives me the heebie-jeebies. My pantiliners were just an old buzz lightyear sheet that i cut up and sewed together in 4 layers, the actual pads I used flannel and 3 layers of cotton batting, that has been working absolutely wonderful! They are ugly as sin though, because i wasn't lying about being lazy. I sewed the basic pad shape leaving both ends open, stuffed in the batting, then zig-zag stitched over the ends. but they work <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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I hate wings and make mine without. I pin them in place, across the front from the outside of my panties. With a small safety pin. I works great.
 

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<a href="http://www.angelfire.com/biz/mothershelpinghands/mypatt.html" target="_blank">http://www.angelfire.com/biz/mothers...ds/mypatt.html</a><br><br>
Here is a link that is super-easy for beginner sewers. These are similiar to how I made my pads, and in there she says you can prevent bunching and riding up by making the pads longer. I hadn't thought of that but my pads are quite long and I never have a problem with them riding up. I don't have wings on mine, though I plan on making some wth wings for my super-heavy flow days. I have very heavy periods so my pads either have a layer of PUL (I bought a bag of scraps from someone who makes diapers) or they have a layer of wool interlock on the bottom. I prefer the wool, but the PUL does work well. So, the bottom layer of mine is PUL or wool, the 3 inner layers (2 for lighter days) are a very thick old holey terry towel (recycling at it's best, lol) and then the top layer is organic french terry or organic cotton fleece. I just hand drew a shape similiar to my favorite disposable pads and then serged them together. They really work well and aren't too bulky at all. Good luck!
 

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I make them for myself/girlfriends w/out wings and they stay put quite well<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"> This is the pattern I got from the lady who makes them for the local HFS.<br><br>
1) Trace the shape of a panyliner that you like on to a piece of cardboard (allow extra around the edge for seam allowance.)<br>
•Cut 1 shape out of microfleece for the top layer. It will wick wetness away from your skin.<br>
•Cut 3 shapes of either 100% cotton quilting material OR flannel for the absorbent core.<br>
•Cut 1 shape of regular fleece/velour/corduroy for the bottom (up against your undies.) I find the texture of the fabric helps keep the pad from shifting; particularly if you wear cotton underwear. I prefer the fleece. It’s breathable, yet provides a moisture barrier.<br><br>
2) Stack the quilting material together & straight stitch across the width of the pad about every ¼ - ½ inch. This enables the pad to bend and flex with your body and preventing bunching. This step also reduces the "bulkyness" of the pad.<br><br>
3) Add the bottom and top layer to the quilted core and zigzag stitch all the way around the pad. I round the corners to avoid “pokey” edges.<br><br>
Does that all make sense? If not let me know if you would like pics, and I'll try to figure out how to post them<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 

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Here's another easy one and a PDF format pattern is included so there's no drawing or scaling.<br><br><a href="http://shewhorunsintheforest.googlepages.com/" target="_blank">http://shewhorunsintheforest.googlepages.com/</a>
 
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