Mothering Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,471 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
<p>All my adult life, I've eaten a vegetarian diet and recently added back fish but mainly in the form of frozen fillets or canned tuna/salmon so not much actual cooking (just baking the fillets or adding to salads).  I'm thinking about incorporating chicken, turkey and beef back into my diet but I'm really lost.  Could you offer some resources for a person with no experience with cooking these?  Thanks!</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,081 Posts
Chicken:<br>
-I'm assuming as a veggie you were familiar with stir fries. Buy some boneless skinless chicken breast, cut into half inch slices, put in the wok or frying pan near the beginning of the stir fry, cook until the meat is totally white (take a piece out and cut into it to be sure). Add your veggies. Use whatever sauce you want: just garlic/soy sauce/fish sauce is yummy and simple, or buy teriyaki sauce, or whatever your stir fry standard is.<br>
-Roasted chicken (either whole or in parts)--there was a recent thread on this with lots of tips, try searching to pull it up. Roasted chicken is very versatile and leftovers can be used in so many dishes!<br>
Other ideas: Chicken fried rice (esp with leftover chicken), chicken caesar salad (saute a skinless boneless breast in a pan until cooked through, serve over salad), arroz con pollo (it's a Peruvian dish with rice cooked with cilantro, peas and carrots, look up a recipe), pesto pasta with a sauteed or roasted chicken breast on the top.<br><br>
Beef:<br>
-buy ground beef and cook it in a pan until brown. Add garlic, onion, basil, oregano, tomatoes and any other Italian veggies to make a marinara sauce with beef. Serve with spaghetti. (If you have a prepared marinara sauce it's even easier or you can use whatever marinara recipe you would normally use)<br>
-stir fries as well! you can ask your butcher for stir fry prepared meat, chopped fine for you. same method as above.<br><br>
I don't cook a lot with turkey, so I don't know much about that.<br><br>
One thing that made cooking meat easier for me was getting a meat thermometer to know when chicken is actually done, especially when baking.<br><br>
ETA: I would also recommend getting a good all purpose cookbook like How to Cook Everything or the Joy of Cooking and read the section on meat & poultry. Lots and lots of recipe ideas, plus you can get a good idea about the different cuts and safe cooking techniques and everything that makes cooking meat seem difficult.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,753 Posts
<p>rootzdawta, I'm in the exact same boat!  We've been vegetarian for over ten years (pretty much all my adult cooking life) and now we're adding meat to our diets.  It's kind of strange to learn to cook all over again!</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I recommend How to Cook Everything by Mark Bittman (the book is awesome, and there is also an app for your ipod/smartphone for only $5 - highly worth it!)  Anyway, it has ALL the basics - how to do it and WHY, lots of variations on recipes.  There are pictures for how to carve a whole chicken, etc.  I've had success so far with broiling boneless, skinless chicken breast, broiling salmon and cooking turkey bacon.  I'm excited to try roasting a whole chicken (but my husband is squeamish about the whole carcass thing).  I'd be interested to hear your success stories and journey adding meat back into your diet. Good luck! :thumb</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,198 Posts
<p>How long is "all my adult life" - it could be a couple of years or a couple of decades... or more?  Introducing meats if you've been vegetarian for 25 years is going to be a lot different than if you've been vegetarian for 5 years.  After a while, your gut will have a harder time processing meat. Depending on how long you were actually vegetarian will change how you reintroduce them back to your diet.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,006 Posts
<p>are you looking for advice on how to cook those types of meats (ie basic instructions to bake, broil, roast, saute, etc) or are you looking for the proper way to slowly add them back to your diet?</p>
<p> </p>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,471 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>velochic</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1286109/help-me-incorporate-chicken-turkey-beef-back-into-my-diet#post_16125177"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>How long is "all my adult life" - it could be a couple of years or a couple of decades... or more?  Introducing meats if you've been vegetarian for 25 years is going to be a lot different than if you've been vegetarian for 5 years.  After a while, your gut will have a harder time processing meat. Depending on how long you were actually vegetarian will change how you reintroduce them back to your diet.</p>
</div>
</div>
<br><br><p>Well, I'm going on 29 and I was vegetarian from 20 till recently when I added fish back into my diet.  </p>
<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>HollyBearsMom</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1286109/help-me-incorporate-chicken-turkey-beef-back-into-my-diet#post_16125199"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>are you looking for advice on how to cook those types of meats (ie basic instructions to bake, broil, roast, saute, etc) or are you looking for the proper way to slowly add them back to your diet?</p>
<p> </p>
</div>
</div>
<p> </p>
<p>Basic advice on simple ways to cook it.  <br>
 </p>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,471 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>la mamita</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1286109/help-me-incorporate-chicken-turkey-beef-back-into-my-diet#post_16123888"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br>
Chicken:<br>
-I'm assuming as a veggie you were familiar with stir fries. Buy some boneless skinless chicken breast, cut into half inch slices, put in the wok or frying pan near the beginning of the stir fry, cook until the meat is totally white (take a piece out and cut into it to be sure). Add your veggies. Use whatever sauce you want: just garlic/soy sauce/fish sauce is yummy and simple, or buy teriyaki sauce, or whatever your stir fry standard is.<br>
-Roasted chicken (either whole or in parts)--there was a recent thread on this with lots of tips, try searching to pull it up. Roasted chicken is very versatile and leftovers can be used in so many dishes!<br>
Other ideas: Chicken fried rice (esp with leftover chicken), chicken caesar salad (saute a skinless boneless breast in a pan until cooked through, serve over salad), arroz con pollo (it's a Peruvian dish with rice cooked with cilantro, peas and carrots, look up a recipe), pesto pasta with a sauteed or roasted chicken breast on the top.<br><br>
Beef:<br>
-buy ground beef and cook it in a pan until brown. Add garlic, onion, basil, oregano, tomatoes and any other Italian veggies to make a marinara sauce with beef. Serve with spaghetti. (If you have a prepared marinara sauce it's even easier or you can use whatever marinara recipe you would normally use)<br>
-stir fries as well! you can ask your butcher for stir fry prepared meat, chopped fine for you. same method as above.<br><br>
I don't cook a lot with turkey, so I don't know much about that.<br><br>
One thing that made cooking meat easier for me was getting a meat thermometer to know when chicken is actually done, especially when baking.<br><br>
ETA: I would also recommend getting a good all purpose cookbook like How to Cook Everything or the Joy of Cooking and read the section on meat & poultry. Lots and lots of recipe ideas, plus you can get a good idea about the different cuts and safe cooking techniques and everything that makes cooking meat seem difficult.</div>
</div>
<p><br>
Thank you so much!  Your recs sound very doable.   I'll borrow those books from the library to see if I like them.</p>
<p> </p>
<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Keeta</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1286109/help-me-incorporate-chicken-turkey-beef-back-into-my-diet#post_16125082"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>rootzdawta, I'm in the exact same boat!  We've been vegetarian for over ten years (pretty much all my adult cooking life) and now we're adding meat to our diets.  It's kind of strange to learn to cook all over again!</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I recommend How to Cook Everything by Mark Bittman (the book is awesome, and there is also an app for your ipod/smartphone for only $5 - highly worth it!)  Anyway, it has ALL the basics - how to do it and WHY, lots of variations on recipes.  There are pictures for how to carve a whole chicken, etc.  I've had success so far with broiling boneless, skinless chicken breast, broiling salmon and cooking turkey bacon.  I'm excited to try roasting a whole chicken (but my husband is squeamish about the whole carcass thing).  I'd be interested to hear your success stories and journey adding meat back into your diet. Good luck! :thumb</p>
</div>
</div>
<p> </p>
<p>It is strange learning to cook again!  :)  Thanks for the book rec . . . I think that's exactly the book I need.  I'll borrow that one too.  I'm squeamish about roasting a whole chicken too.  Heck, I'l be honest:  I'm squeamish about touching/dealing with raw/not frozen solid meat.  <br>
 </p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
607 Posts
<p> </p>
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">
<div>Keeta    I'd be interested to hear your success stories and journey adding meat back into your diet. Good luck! :thumb</div>
</div>
</div>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p>I'd be interested to hear about both of your success.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Interesting....  <span><img alt="eat.gif" src="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/eat.gif"></span></p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
619 Posts
<p>Here's a few bits of advice/knowledge:</p>
<p>-If you are making a soup/stew, if really enhances the flavor of the meat if you brown it before putting in the pot.</p>
<p>-To make good meatballs, mix together 1lb ground meat (beef or turkey), 2 eggs, and seasonings, then mix in 1 cup bread crumbs. Brown ion a pan, then either put in a soup or bake in the oven at 350.</p>
<p>-Roast a whole chicken. You'll have leftovers to use. Use them in soups/stews, sandwiches, stir-frys, salads, etc.</p>
<p>-To cook a good roast, oil a crockpot or a dutch oven with olive oil. Add a good quality roast with some carrots, potatoes, garlic, and herbs. Cook untill done in a crockpot, it'll be a few hours. In a dutch oven on the stovetop, more like 1 hour).</p>
<p>-A meat thermometer is worth spending the money.</p>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,471 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
<p>^^Thank you!  Those tips are really helpful.  My mom has a crockpot she doesn't use that I could borrow . . . I like the idea of using a crockpot.  </p>
<p> </p>
<p>I have a meat thermometer already (that I use for baking bread/making yogurt).  </p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
<p>I went through this a few years ago. Shrimp is fast and easy--stir fried or in soups (just add to favorite vegetarian recipes). I found boiled or braised chicken/red meat easier to digest than roasted or pan-fried. Stews, curries, soups, ect. worked best for me (and still do). A classic beef stew or ground-beef chili is easy and comes out nicely in a crock pot. Grilled chicken on top of pasta with pesto sauce or a ceasar salad is pretty easy. I usually get ideas on epicurious.com or look up dishes I tried first at restaurants online--sometimes you will even find video recipes. Otherwise, I use my vegetarian cookbooks & add some shredded chicken or prawns. I get inspiration from the Weston Price Foundation, and have been totally sold on the value of bone broths. Every once in a while, I boil a chicken, pick the meat off, then cook the bones all day with carrot, celery, and onion. It does take time, but you're left with the base for many quick & easy meals--nutritious broth for soups & sauces and shredded chicken that can be added to casseroles, wraps, soups, ect. Something to consider if you're going to spend a Sunday at home. I often make enchiladas with the shredded meat--mix meat with a little sauce & sour cream. Roll in warm tortillas. Smother with sauce & some cheese & bake. Chilaquiles is also easy: mix green salsa, tortilla chips, and shredded chicken. Put in a baking dish & top with crema mexicana or creme fraiche + feta. Bake until tender. Years later, I still have a problem with big hunks of meat on a plate. Here are some online meat recipes off my list that aren't so "meaty". They may not be to your taste, but these are all good places to look up recipes. </p>
<p> </p>
<p><a href="http://www.marthastewart.com/recipe/stir-fried-honey-ginger-chicken-with-peppers" target="_blank">http://www.marthastewart.com/recipe/stir-fried-honey-ginger-chicken-with-peppers</a></p>
<p><a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/10/health/nutrition/10recipehealth.html?_r=3" target="_blank">http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/10/health/nutrition/10recipehealth.html?_r=3</a></p>
<p><a href="http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Beef-and-Curry-Pie-236403%C2%A0%C2%A0%C2%A0" target="_blank">http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Beef-and-Curry-Pie-236403   </a> (disguises the taste of grass-fed beef really well. make a double batch & freeze)</p>
<p><a href="http://nourishedkitchen.com/sole-meuniere/%C2%A0%C2%A0" target="_blank">http://nourishedkitchen.com/sole-meuniere/  </a> (I use white flour instead of hazelnut flour & comes out great)</p>
<p><a href="http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/recipes/recipe.php?recipeId=2441 " target="_blank">http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/recipes/recipe.php?recipeId=2441 </a> (I cut up chunks of chicken breast & add with the beans)</p>
<p><a href="http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/The-Great-After-Thanksgiving-Turkey-Enchiladas-15693" target="_blank">http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/The-Great-After-Thanksgiving-Turkey-Enchiladas-15693</a></p>
<p><a href="http://www.mediterrasian.com/cuisine_of_month_ricepaper.htm" target="_blank">http://www.mediterrasian.com/cuisine_of_month_ricepaper.htm</a></p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
589 Posts
<p>I went back to eating meat after being veggie for 12? years. I discovered a gluten intolerance soon after my second pregnancy. Since I was eating a lot of wheat products I am not surprised. I started off by buying already cooked chicken breast from our local health food store deli. I would eat maybe 1/4 of it at a time. It was definitely a weird consistency at first. And I found that after I ate it, I felt good, had energy. I did not at all feel icky, like I thought I would. I was envisioning tummy aches and constipation and vomiting (sorry). I was not about to buy raw chicken and cook it myself.</p>
<p>Finally after a while dh suggested he could cook it for me. He had been a cook for a while and had cooked it before, while I had never. It turned out good and slowly he started eating it too after being veg for a long time too. Since then I have only cooked chicken 2x. Once I marinated it and then baked it and the other time I made chicken and wild rice soup.</p>
<p>We also went through a period where we bought frozen chicken nuggets from health food store, but I have to avoid corn now, so we make our own chicken strips. I have eaten canned tuna a couple of times...it was pretty good. I ate canned salmon 1x and it was way too fishy for me. I have been thinking about trying smoked salmon. Dh has a fish allergy, like he could go into a coma, so I'm not too keen on actually cooking the fish at my house. I would definitely try cooked salmon or some other fish. I did really like fish as a kid. But, I would have to eat it somewhere else. Dh was ok with the minimal smell from the canned tuna.</p>
<p>Also, I really seem to like applegate chicken sausage, for some reason, the spices?</p>
<p>I've tried turkey a couple times and for some reason did not feel well after both times, sorta delayed reaction.</p>
<p>I have no desire to eat beef or cook it. Although, I could be swayed, possibly, if it were high quality and was mixed with something, like at a potluck or something.</p>
<p>Sorry no cooking advice really. But just know that someone else has been there.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Not to pry, but why are you adding the meat back in?</p>
<p> </p>
<p>P.S. During my first pregnancy I was having dreams of eating meat. I took that as a sign.</p>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,471 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>northerngirl</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1286109/help-me-incorporate-chicken-turkey-beef-back-into-my-diet#post_16144544"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>I went back to eating meat after being veggie for 12? years. I discovered a gluten intolerance soon after my second pregnancy. Since I was eating a lot of wheat products I am not surprised. I started off by buying already cooked chicken breast from our local health food store deli. I would eat maybe 1/4 of it at a time. It was definitely a weird consistency at first. And I found that after I ate it, I felt good, had energy. I did not at all feel icky, like I thought I would. I was envisioning tummy aches and constipation and vomiting (sorry). I was not about to buy raw chicken and cook it myself.</p>
<p>Finally after a while dh suggested he could cook it for me. He had been a cook for a while and had cooked it before, while I had never. It turned out good and slowly he started eating it too after being veg for a long time too. Since then I have only cooked chicken 2x. Once I marinated it and then baked it and the other time I made chicken and wild rice soup.</p>
<p>We also went through a period where we bought frozen chicken nuggets from health food store, but I have to avoid corn now, so we make our own chicken strips. I have eaten canned tuna a couple of times...it was pretty good. I ate canned salmon 1x and it was way too fishy for me. I have been thinking about trying smoked salmon. Dh has a fish allergy, like he could go into a coma, so I'm not too keen on actually cooking the fish at my house. I would definitely try cooked salmon or some other fish. I did really like fish as a kid. But, I would have to eat it somewhere else. Dh was ok with the minimal smell from the canned tuna.</p>
<p>Also, I really seem to like applegate chicken sausage, for some reason, the spices?</p>
<p>I've tried turkey a couple times and for some reason did not feel well after both times, sorta delayed reaction.</p>
<p>I have no desire to eat beef or cook it. Although, I could be swayed, possibly, if it were high quality and was mixed with something, like at a potluck or something.</p>
<p>Sorry no cooking advice really. But just know that someone else has been there.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Not to pry, but why are you adding the meat back in?</p>
<p> </p>
<p>P.S. During my first pregnancy I was having dreams of eating meat. I took that as a sign.</p>
</div>
</div>
<p><br>
I'm adding meat back in because I can't seem to tolerate beans of any kind most especially soybeans.  It doesn't matter if they are soaked, sprouted or fermented.  I can't digest it.  I started have terrible gastrointestinal issues when I went vegetarian and for years blamed it on everything else: I was just detoxing from dairy, I was sensitive to wheat, I just couldn't have fake meats, etc . . . I took out all beans and immediately started to feel better.  I have been without beans for 2 weeks now and I continue to feel better and better.  </p>
<p> </p>
<p>You know, during my first pregnancy, I craved meat so badly but managed to avoid it. I didn't take it as a sign.  I wish I had.  But I was really, really determined to keep meat out of my diet.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Anyway, some good news on this front for me:</p>
<p>1.  I made a chicken stir fry with one pound of chicken breast.  It's not the greatest recipe but it was palatable.  I think I know how to improve it but I don't think I like chicken in stir fry.  I'm going to use the other pound of chicken breast some other way . . . not sure what.</p>
<p>2.  I made an awesome beef stew using a Paula Deen recipe.  I thickened it with one potato and doubled the spices and it's delicious.</p>
<p>3.  I bought tilapia fillets which I've just been baking with lemon juice and cajun seasoning, garlic, salt and lots of pepper.  That paired with some lightly steamed broccoli and some quinoa or brown rice makes an awesome dinner.</p>
<p>4.  I bought some shrimp yesterday that I may use in a stir fry.  </p>
<p>5.  I bought the applegate chicken sausage which paired with my oatmeal waffles should make a great replacement for the tempeh bacon (soy) and pancakes (wheat) that I usually eat on the weekends.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I'm feeling a lot more confident about cooking with meat and I feel like if I have 5 or 6 go to recipes, I'll be doing okay.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>So even though I know wheat is not the culprit in all of my issues, I know I was eating too much.  Being wheat free for a couple of weeks helped me make some good replacements for things.  Currently, I'm thinking about trying a paleo-diet but I am not sure.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I joined a buying co-op for my meats by the way (and eggs, yogurt, milk, etc . . .) so I'm able to get quality, grass fed meats/pastured chicken and eggs from humanely raised animals.  This was the deal-breaker for me and I'm so fortunate to have it available to me.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
589 Posts
<p>Good to hear your doing well with adding more meat. We make the chicken strips with <a href="http://www.gooddayglutenfree.com/Hol-Grain-Crispy-Chicken-Coating-Mix/productinfo/1HG10051/" target="_blank">this</a> coating. I really like it. Although it does have some spices that I shouldn't have, I seem to do ok with it. YUM. You could use it with other meats like it says on the container. You could make chicken soup. I just made chicken and wild rice soup last night. I use a whole chicken, this is a first for me. I am still weirded out a bit when washing chicken in the sink. But I got beyond that and the result was so yummy and there was so much soup I put some in the freezer and there was so much meat from the 3lb bird that there was enough for the soup and then some (which I froze) Hooray. There is also chicken quesidillas gf or chicken tacos or something like that. Honey mustard chicken.</p>
<p>How did the beef go when you ate it? Strange question I know. Good that you found that buying coop that you can get your meats and dairy from. I wish I could have dairy.MMM CHEEESEEE.</p>
<p>Are you ok with lentils? Or just the beans are bad for you?</p>
<p>I was muscle tested for a bunch of foods and the woman said that I was a paleo girl. Paleo is no grains? No quinoa, rice, millet, wild rice? Those I can do. I have a really yummy curry veggie burger that is made with millet. So good. Can send you a link to it if you want.</p>
<p>Maybe your having problems with some veggies? Do you keep a food diary? I found out I can't have nightshades, and can tell when I slip up. Or maybe rice? Some have difficulty digesting that.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,558 Posts
<p>I don't know if this appeals to you at all, but I like to use good quality ground turkey in place of beef sometimes.  Tonight I browned ground turkey to use in a marinara sauce over pasta--easy meal with a salad to complete it.  I also use ground turkey in chili, which my family is fine with.  Actually, I'm pretty sure that the kids don't even notice.  I was cooking turkey burgers to have w/ a bun and slice of cheese, etc., instead of hamburger, but I always overcooked it, and it was dry.  I'll have to perfect my technique!</p>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,471 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>northerngirl</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1286109/help-me-incorporate-chicken-turkey-beef-back-into-my-diet#post_16151230"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>Good to hear your doing well with adding more meat. We make the chicken strips with <a href="http://www.gooddayglutenfree.com/Hol-Grain-Crispy-Chicken-Coating-Mix/productinfo/1HG10051/" target="_blank">this</a> coating. I really like it. Although it does have some spices that I shouldn't have, I seem to do ok with it. YUM. You could use it with other meats like it says on the container. You could make chicken soup. I just made chicken and wild rice soup last night. I use a whole chicken, this is a first for me. I am still weirded out a bit when washing chicken in the sink. But I got beyond that and the result was so yummy and there was so much soup I put some in the freezer and there was so much meat from the 3lb bird that there was enough for the soup and then some (which I froze) Hooray. There is also chicken quesidillas gf or chicken tacos or something like that. Honey mustard chicken.</p>
<p>How did the beef go when you ate it? Strange question I know. Good that you found that buying coop that you can get your meats and dairy from. I wish I could have dairy.MMM CHEEESEEE.</p>
<p>Are you ok with lentils? Or just the beans are bad for you?</p>
<p>I was muscle tested for a bunch of foods and the woman said that I was a paleo girl. Paleo is no grains? No quinoa, rice, millet, wild rice? Those I can do. I have a really yummy curry veggie burger that is made with millet. So good. Can send you a link to it if you want.</p>
<p>Maybe your having problems with some veggies? Do you keep a food diary? I found out I can't have nightshades, and can tell when I slip up. Or maybe rice? Some have difficulty digesting that.</p>
</div>
</div>
<p> </p>
<p>It seems like all beans but I'm thinking some may be worse than others.  Truthfully, I am enjoying feeling good and I don't want to experiment.  I felt bad for so long.  I'd like that curry veggie burger recipe.  I do keep a food diary b/c I do Weight Watchers.  I suspected rice for a while but I seem to do okay with it. <br>
 </p>
<br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>karne</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1286109/help-me-incorporate-chicken-turkey-beef-back-into-my-diet#post_16165882"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>I don't know if this appeals to you at all, but I like to use good quality ground turkey in place of beef sometimes.  Tonight I browned ground turkey to use in a marinara sauce over pasta--easy meal with a salad to complete it.  I also use ground turkey in chili, which my family is fine with.  Actually, I'm pretty sure that the kids don't even notice.  I was cooking turkey burgers to have w/ a bun and slice of cheese, etc., instead of hamburger, but I always overcooked it, and it was dry.  I'll have to perfect my technique!</p>
</div>
</div>
<p><br>
I bought some ground turkey from my buyer's coop and I'm going to make pasta sauce tomorrow!  :)  </p>
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top