Mothering Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
677 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My kindergardener is getting really behind on her site words. The class is starting the next round of 10 works and my DD only knows 11 of the 20 they have covered so far. We have been doing flash cards, but I know think that is working for her. I have also been pointing them out as we read at night.<br><br>
Do you have any other ideas on how I can help her to grasp the site words?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,219 Posts
As a teacher I see this all the time, and have found three categories of activities that are helpful:<br><br>
1) Kinesthetic activities (fancy teacher speak for activities where the child is moving) such as writing the words, building the letters/words out of playdough, fingerpainting the words in finger paint or pudding or shaving cream, writing the words in sidewalk chalk on the squares of game of hopscotch and spelling the word aloud each time you jump on it, play tic tac toe only instead of x and o one of you writes "is" in your square while the other writes "the", etc . . .<br><br>
2) Activities where the child has to hold the details of the word in short term memory for a period of time.<br><br>
For example: hang the flash cards on the fridge, then go into another room and show your child a flash card, if need be tell them the word and then ask them to go into the kitchen and bring you back the matching flashcard from the fridge, but don't let them take the first card with them -- talk to them about the ways they can remember both the word and how to spell it while they go such as whisper the letters under the breath, remember a really noticeable feature (look has two circles that look like eyeballs in the middle, so chant "look look look" while you're looking for those eyeballs) then come back and show you matching flashcard and read it.<br><br>
Another example: play go fish with the flash cards. Have her leave her cards face down on the table instead of in her hand (easier for K kids anyway). Show her your card and say "this word is go, Do you have go" and have her look at it, and then put it back in your hand before she looks for it -- again if she needs help talk to her about how she's going to remember what word she's looking for.<br><br>
3) Activities that help kids use phonics strategies to attack sight words -- kids memory banks at this age are often like giant huge messy filing cabinets -- somewhere deep in there is the knowledge that w-i-t-h spells with, but they can't always pull it up. If you remind your daughter to look at the first letter, and make that sound with her lips while she tries to remember it, you're eliminating 25/26 of the drawers she needs to look in -- this is particularly helpful for those kids that look at a card and guess words that have none of the same sounds, or kids that look at a word in a book and say "I know that word! It's on the word wall in green ink" but they can't tell you what it is.<br><br>
An example of this would be to spread the 10 new words out in front of her and say "I'm going to read you a word and I want you to find it, I know you don't recognize all of them yet, but I want you to think like a detective and figure out which one it could be" Then say "here" and talk her through the fact that you're going to want to find a word that starts with h, and Oh, yeah you hear an r in there somewhere too, which of the three h words (imagine how, here, and he) could be here.<br><br>
Another example: Play the game "Don't be greedy" make (have her make with you) a stack of cards with a bunch for each word, also make some cards with a smiley face (I make mine with a Cheshire Cat style smile) that are "greedy" cards. Shuffle the cards, and put them in a stack. The first player goes first and draws a card, reads it and adds it to her deck -- then they can decide if they want another card, if they draw another card and it's a word they can read it and keep it, if it's a greedy card they have to give their entire stack back. The trick though is that she needs to watch you as you read your words because if you read a word wrong and she catches you you have to give HER your card (or cards, depends on how you want to play). She doesn't need to be able to read the word to know you read it wrong, she can just say "that can't be he it starts with a T". I often play this game in a silly way, where I try and catch the child back, only really I'm helping them -- so when I see that searching look in their face I'll accidentally blurt out a word and then slap my hand over my face like I'm sooo disappointed that I helped them, or I'll chant under my breath "don't say is, don't say is" and then be shocked that they "heard me" and figured out that the word was is. If you have a child who does a lot of impulsive guessing without stopping to think you can also make a rule that "if you say it wrong I get it, but if you ask for help I'm happy to help you figure it out". One good thing about this game is that it leads to discussions -- e.g. the child says "that can't be the, the doesn't have a T sound" and you can explain who t and h get together to make a different sound. Another good thing about this game is that when the words are new and you want them to spend a lot of time watching and listening you can make sure that every time it's your turn you draw and draw until you get a greedy card (and throw a minor tantrum to amuse them), or if they're at a later stage and you want them to do most of the reading you can only draw one card every time even late in the game when the greedy cards are all gone and drawing a lot of cards is the winning strategy -- that way they're reading a lot and you're reading a little. Either way you're bound to lose.<br><br>
Sometimes the very best activities are ones that combine 2 or 3 of these. For example:<br><br>
Play the game where she looks in the other room for the word, only instead of having her bring back the flash card, have her copy down the word and bring it back that back to you.<br><br>
Play Go Fish and keep a running list of who got which words which she writes (best of all, have her write it on a "paper" made of very thin sheet of clay with a sharpish stick -- the clay will slow her down as she writes and make her need to concentrate) stop frequently and compare lists say "listen to how long my list is (doesn't hurt to throw the game so her list is longer -- Go Fish is a very easy game to lose on purpose) and then have her read her list to you -- encourage her to use phonics strategies if she gets stuck.<br><br>
Give her a pair of scissors and a magazine -- show her a word, figure out together what it says, and then hide the word and have her find it in the magazine, cut it out, and paste it on a piece of paper.<br>
Make the Go Fish cards together, you make one she makes one so she gets the kinesthetic input too -- in my small groups that I work with we almost always make the cards and then I send them home -- we probably spend 20 minutes making them and 5 minutes playing them but all they remember is "I made a game with Ms. G.".<br><br>
Take out 2 or 3 flashcards and show them to her, tell her what they are and have her copy them across the top of a piece of paper. Tell her a silly sentence that contains one word and either (depending on her writing ability) have her write the sentence ("invented spelling" is great here except for the actual 2 or 3 words you're asking her to spell right) or you write the sentence and stop when you get to the word, and then ask her to find the sight word and copy it down -- if she can't do that then use the phonics strategies above to help her find it.<br><br>
Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
Sight word bingo is a big hit, mostly because it's fun with no pressure. Draw out a bingo card with 9 boxes (3 rows of 3 boxes). Each player (make sure other people play too so it truly is a game and not a test) writes a sight word in each box. The caller uses the flash card stack, calling out words one at a time. The child gets to really look and play detective with each round, placing a fun object over the correct word. The first to get three in a row wins, or whatever pattern is agreed upon at the start.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,167 Posts
Ds1 loves sight word bingo. It's one of his favorite games.<br><br>
Put them on a big piece of posterboard and hang it in the dining room or living room where she sees them all the time.<br><br>
Write a story together using the words.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
475 Posts
Momily -- thank you for those great ideas. I came to post my one little idea that now seems oh so lame next to your great ones. May I borrow your post and share it with my fellow kindergarten parents? I'm the classroom liason for my dd's class and we were just talking about sight words the other day.<br><br>
Here's my lame idea:<br>
Sight word hop-scotch. DD is kinesthetic and I can only go through the stack of cards so many times myself... so we lay them on the floor and I say them so she can hop to them when she sees them. variation: I prop them up around the room and she hunts for them. It sounds a bit like the refrigerator idea -- it gets her doing the detective work and keeping the sound of the word in her head while she searches for it.<br><br>
thanks for the ideas mamas -- dd will be thrilled. and now I have homework making bingo cards <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,049 Posts
We have a set of books that focus on site words we ordered from a school book club....scholastic I think.....dds not in kinder yet , but we read and i point to each word and dd reads the ones she knows
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,219 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>violet</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10339466"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Momily -- thank you for those great ideas. I came to post my one little idea that now seems oh so lame next to your great ones. May I borrow your post and share it with my fellow kindergarten parents? I'm the classroom liason for my dd's class and we were just talking about sight words the other day.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
<br>
Thank you <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"><br><br>
I think your idea is a great one! Combines all the things I think are important. Yes, of course you can share it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Dump three or four copies of each word into a bowl with 4 or 5 cards labeled "BOOM". Draw a card. If you can read it you get to keep it. If you dram a "BOOM" card you have to put all your cards back in the bowl.<br><br><br>
Lay the cards in a grid pattern. Hide a sticker or something flat under one of the cards. She has to guess which word the sticker is under and spell the word. Play until she finds the sticker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
there are some cute sight word activities on this site:<br><br><a href="http://www.janbrett.com" target="_blank">http://www.janbrett.com</a> My kids love the pictures that accompany the words!<br><br>
Also try the BBC website!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
254 Posts
I am jumping out of lurkdom to say thanks for these ideas. My ds just finished with a version of the hopscotch game and was able to identify all the site words required at this time. When I just hold it up for him to read he stumbles through. Thanks for giving me ideas on how to change things up!<br><br>
Maggie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,305 Posts
I just had to say that I think its sad that there is such pressure on these 5 and 6 yr old to memorize words/read. I can't see this leading to "reading is fun" in the future.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>kennedy444</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10468633"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I just had to say that I think its sad that there is such pressure on these 5 and 6 yr old to memorize words/read. I can't see this leading to "reading is fun" in the future.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
<br><br>
I was going to say something along these lines, too, but forgot when I first posted.<br><br>
I have seen firsthand what this pressure can do to kids. My eldest ds had a terrible time and they wanted to hold him back due to his not reading in K. We didnt do it, though, and at the beginning of first grade, he suddenly had a "light bulb" go off over his head and he jumped a level a week or so and wsa reading strongly by Oct.!<br><br>
Most kids he knows, including "gifted" ones, HATE reading and say it's for losers. Their writing reflects that. Makes me sad...all the years we homeschooled, ds was always reading. That was 2-6th. He started to hate it a little, too, when he went back to PS in 7th and was pressured to do "AR" tests, etc. He'd do a book report "wrong" and get a zero for not following directions....that sort of thing.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top