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Discussion Starter #1
I'm new to this, and have a couple of basic grain soaking questions (have yet to get NT) I mostly cook brn rice, quinoa, oats (steel cut) millet.<br><br>
Do you discard the soaking water? Do you put kefir in the soaking water? How much water to soak in? How long to soak?
 

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I soak everything over night. I know some things can be soaked for a shorter time, but its just too complicated to count the hours, so I put them to soak before going to bed, then they are ready come morning.<br><br>
This is what I do for grains and beans. Put your grains into a bowl, and fill with water until the grains are floating or there is room for expansion. I put about two tablespoons of 'soaking medium' for 1 cup of water, and give it a good mixin. I use kefir, whey, lemon juice, yogurt and vinegar as a soaking agent depending on what it is. For rice, millet, quinoa or beans, I use water kefir, milk kefir, whey or lemon juice. For oats its nice to use yogurt or milk kefir is it helps to make them more creamy, as opposed to whey or lemon juice. But it does come down to personal taste too. Any of these things are good to use.<br><br>
Its not necessary to soak in ALL kefir, lemon juice or what ever you use, but just as long as there is a good amount and the ph is acidic, as this is what helps reduce the phytates.<br><br>
I discard the soaking water when I soak beans, because I find it reduces the gassiness, but for other things like brown rice, quinoa and oats etc, if you have soaked them in whey or kefir, you will be throwing away alot of goodness, so personally I dont, I keep that liquid and add more if needed for cooking.<br><br>
HTH!
 

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I have pretty much settled on Gale Force's methods, outlined here:<br><a href="http://rebuild-from-depression.com/simplechange/simplechange/grains-legumes-nuts-seeds.html" target="_blank">http://rebuild-from-depression.com/s...uts-seeds.html</a>
 

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It only takes a splash of vinegar to bring 32oz of water down to a pH level of ~4, so you really don't need too much of your acid. Water is usually around a 7 or 8 depending on how it has been treated.<br><br>
I find the grains soak up a lot of the liquid & usually there is not a lot left. I've given diluted whey soaking water from beans to my house plants, they seemed to like it. Mostly tried that because we pay for every gallon of water and I hate to waste it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I don't have an oven with a pilot light. What do you use? Oven? any other ideas?<br><br>
Does NT provide specific times for certain grains? Do all grains need to be soaked?<br><br>
So the soaking neutralizes the phytic acid? It's not in the soaking water? Science at work here, acidic water neutralizing an acid...?
 

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Good question, so I looked it up and NT says that "soaking allows enzymes and other helpful organisms to break down and neutralize phytic acid"<br><br>
Most of the info about soaking is presented in terms of the benefits of sprouting, such as:<br><br>
sprouting breaks down complex carbs that can produce gas in the intestines, and inactivates aflatoxins, potential carcinogens in grains.<br><br>
when a grain/seed germinates (sprouts) numerous enzymes that are helpful for digestion are produced.<br><br>
so it seems really it's not about the soaking liquid doing the changing itself, more that the liquid provides the right environment for sprouting, and in the case of adding whey or kefir, also providing some of the organisms that help the process.
 

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In the case of soaking ground or rolled grains, a warm, slightly acidic medium allows the phytase enzyme to activate, which then neutralizes the phytic acid. It's not sprouting in that case. I think.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>AJP</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7920604"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">In the case of soaking ground or rolled grains, a warm, slightly acidic medium allows the phytase enzyme to activate, which then neutralizes the phytic acid. It's not sprouting in that case. I think.</div>
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That seems to be the case, with ground grains its more of a chemical reaction. I know with soaking whole grains, its the action of the seed/grain sprouting that reduces or deactivates the phytates, as this is what protects the seed until ideal conditions eventuate for germination.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
So the phytase (enzyme) doesn't activate if the grain is whole? Most of my grains are whole, does this mean I actually need to *see* sprouting before I cook them? How long does this take?
 

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The phytase will be activated either way, but it's less effective with whole grain kernels, I assume because of the surface area. Phytates break down much faster and more thoroughly in flour than in kernels.
 
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