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I know the right thing to do is to let your toddler pick and choose what he wants to eat because they have a natural instinct to guide their hunger and nutritious needs.<br><br>
But my ds (17 months) is ALWAYS, day in and day out, reaching out for meat and dairy. He's been doing it since he started eating finger foods.<br><br>
I have these things in my fridge because my husband is a meat eater. My dd and I take tofu quite well. But the 'boys' in the house can't stand it.<br><br>
DS likes most starch but he doesn't like beans (even though I regularly offer it to him for the past six months). He does like most vegetables except for asparagus & spinach. He LOVES fruits. No exception there.<br><br>
The only balance to the meat / dairy preference is that he's not very much into Cow's milk. If anything, he'd drink it at night before bed time. But oftentimes, it's only a couple of ounces from a sippy cup.<br>
When it comes to meat, he devours the meat and eggs. I know it's cute and wonderful that he has such a healthy appetite. But I'm really scared that he's going to develop some sort of heart disease / diabetes / what not from eating so much animal fat. And when I try to curb it, he becomes quite upset until he gets his fill.<br><br>
Help! What should I do? Should I be worried? Am I making a big deal? This is just a stage?<br><br>
TIA for any comments / advice / suggestions.
 

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I wouldn't worry too much at this point. Both of my kids had preferences for meat and dairy when they first started eating table food. They both (especially my 5-year-old) eat a wide variety of things now.<br><br>
I would offer the fruits and vegetables you know he loves at each mealtime, as well as small portions of the meat and dairy.
 

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maying,<br><br>
Your DS CURRENTLY eats fruits, most veggies, starch and meat/eggs. He is still quite young and his preferences may change in a month, 2 months, etc. My DD won't touch things now at 22 months, that she loved at 17 months (salmon, pears, chicken). Your DS also seems to eat a variety of food. That's great! He is definately learning how different foods make him feel. Good food = Feel good. Keep offering healthy choices and he can't help but eat a healthy diet.<br><br>
A couple things that may help you feel better: 1) You could offer him veggies (or whatever) first so he has less room for the meat and eggs later in the meal. 2) Little ones actually need more fat/cholesterol to build strong well functioning nervous systems and brains Check out Dr. Sears website for more information this at <a href="http://www.askdrsears.com" target="_blank">www.askdrsears.com</a> 3) You can be sure to have leaner meats in the house 4) When making eggs, separate some of them and toss the yolks. We usually have only 1 yolk perday per person in our house, but want the protein from the whites (2-3 whites/person).<br><br>
My DD is well on her way to being a vegetarian. We offer her various protein sources, but she usually refuses them. Tofu, cheese, chicken, various fish. She actually ate a bite of fish yesterday and it was all DH and could do not to dance around the kitchen and high five. She used to eat more tofu and cheese until we started using a pasta high in protein (with chickpeas, etc). I interpreted that as her body recognizing that she was getting enough protein from another source and not needing much from the usual sources.<br><br>
I would also suggest checking out "My Child Won't Eat" by Carlos Gonzalez. He gives some great information and advice for dealing with toddler and their eating.<br><br>
Good luck and hang in there!
 

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I'd not worry so much about the cheese and eggs, but I'd make sure that he only gets lean meats, not fatty meats.
 

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My DD2 is 13 mo and LOVES eggs. She screams for them in the morning (my DH eats them) and we give them to her... but only after she has had fruit. We don't cook them until that point.<br><br>
What's the big deal with the meat? Unless you are morally opposed to it, I don't see the problem with giving toddlers meat... am I missing something? We have lean meat and fish everyday and DD2 gets some... please tell me what I'm issing...
 

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It sounds like your main concern is about the nutritional impact of eating a diet high in animal products. The general consensus in American culture is that animal products are bad for you, but I have started to think differently about this in the last year or two. If you think about it, humans evolved as hunter/gatherers. This means we survived on the animals we could catch and kill, and fruits/vegetables/roots that could be gathered. If we were near water we ate fish. And we probably ate bugs too (not something I'm excited about adding to my diet <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">). The point is, depending on what part of the world they lived in, some primitive peoples subsisted almost entirely on meat and animal blood (not so much dairy or eggs, which require animal domestication). Studies of bones & fossils indicate that when humans became agrarian (and therefore greatly increased the amount of grains and dairy products in their diet), levels of disease skyrocketed (there was a fascinating thread on the <a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/forumdisplay.php?f=365" target="_blank">Traditional Foods forum</a> a while back on this, that you can read <a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?t=546187" target="_blank">here</a>, and here is another <a href="http://home.iprimus.com.au/rboon/PaleolithicDiet.htm" target="_blank">link</a> with interesting information on the benefits of a paleolithic diet).<br><br>
So I have started thinking that meat is not as bad for you as we are led to believe (I'm still undecided on dairy). There is a caveat, however. The animals we eat for food are raised in conditions so far from what is natural for them, that it actually CAN be bad for you to eat that meat. For example, cows were designed to eat grass, not grain (and whatever else is added to the chemical soup they're fed while crammed into a feedlot). This fundamentally changes the composition of their meat. Studies show that grass fed beef has much higher levels of healthy fatty acids and lower levels of "bad" fats when compared to grain fed beef (for more information on this, and just a fascinating read in general, I recommend <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FOmnivores-Dilemma-Natural-History-Meals%2Fdp%2F1594200823%2Fref%3Dpd_bbs_sr_1%2F102-9433082-1672150%3Fie%3DUTF8%26s%3Dbooks%26qid%3D1179771630%26sr%3D1-1" target="_blank">The Omnivore's Dilemma</a>). Don't be fooled by the stuff at Whole Foods, either ... their meat is raised without steroids, antibiotics, hormones, etc., but unless it says "grass fed" on the sign, they were still fed grain.<br><br>
So one thing you could do is try to buy meat that was raised "naturally" (which also happens to be more humane, and is usually as good as, if not better than, organic). This means grass fed beef (which I occasionally find at WF, and recently saw at Trader Joe's for an exceptionally good price), free-range chickens (not chickens who are kept in huge sheds with one tiny door at the end that leads to a tiny patch of grass and isn't opened until they're many weeks old anyway, and so acclimated to their environment that they won't go outside -- again, read The Omnivore's Dilemma for more on that one), etc. It isn't always easy to find this type of food, and yes, it will cost more, but it will be healthier for your family. You can get onto the <a href="http://www.westonaprice.org/index.html" target="_blank">Weston A Price website</a> for links to help you find resources, local farms, etc.<br><br>
When it comes to things like dairy and eggs, these were not traditionally a part of the human diet (and I'm talking tens of thousands of years ago), but they are undeniably a part of our diet and culture now, so I try to find ways to make them "healthier". This means I try to get milk, butter and yogurt from cows that were pastured (grass fed). Organic Valley farmers try to pasture their cows when they can, and I am also seeing more and more dairy products at Whole Foods that are labeled grass fed. Just as this affects their meat, it also affects their milk. Non-homogenized milk is even better (read The Omnivore's Dilemma for more <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1">). Raw dairy products are even better (access to this depends strongly on where you live). I try to get eggs from local farmers, so I know how the chickens are cared for and what they're fed. You would be amazed at how different farm eggs taste and look when compared to grocery store eggs. And again, analysis shows the nutritional content to be vastly different when chickens are allowed to live and eat as they should, compared to how they're raised in factory farms.<br><br>
Of course, none of this addresses the philosophical reasons for not eating animal products (living more lightly on the earth, less pollution, humane treatment of animals, etc.), but it seemed that your concern was mostly about health.<br><br>
The Traditional Foods forum is dedicated to this type of eating, so you could find lots of info there. The Weston Price website has tons of information, and Nourishing Traditions is one of the common books/cookbooks devoted to this type of diet (although there are others).<br><br>
It's all a bit overwhelming, and I don't pretend to understand it all. I am nowhere near to eating the way I think we <i>should</i> be eating, but I am taking small steps, trying to buy more local products, grass fed beef and dairy, local eggs, etc. I think doing that, while still letting your ds eat as he chooses, would be one way to mitigate or eliminate the health concerns you're worried about.<br><br>
Good luck!
 

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Children, especially toddlers, NEET HIGH FAT FOODS. Most of the brain is made up of fats. Children who are deprived of high-fat foods do not have normal development. This I have seen - my next-door neighbours growing up were dr.s and had some weird freaky anti-fat thing going - they are both very scrawny people (and I mean scrawny, very unhealthy, always getting sick) and they never let their kids have any fats at all, and their kids were held back in school, with NONE of them making it to university - statistically very unlikely given the education level of their parents. They also had many behavioural problems.<br><br>
PLEASE let your child eat all the high-fat meat and eggs he wants. He knows what's good for him. And check out <a href="http://www.westonaprice.org" target="_blank">www.westonaprice.org</a> for a more balanced view on dietary saturated fat.<br><br>
(That having been said, conventional factory-farmed meat is probably not a good idea. Try to get as much pastured, organic meat as possible for him.)
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Black Orchid</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8181250"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">My DD2 is 13 mo and LOVES eggs. She screams for them in the morning (my DH eats them) and we give them to her... but only after she has had fruit. We don't cook them until that point.<br><br>
What's the big deal with the meat? Unless you are morally opposed to it, I don't see the problem with giving toddlers meat... am I missing something? We have lean meat and fish everyday and DD2 gets some... please tell me what I'm issing...</div>
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See my previous post for info on meat and eggs (not everyone thinks it's bad). For fish, I think the biggest concern is mercury, PCB, etc. pollution. This is bad for us, but it's <i>especially</i> bad for children. I only buy fish from Whole Foods because they regularly test the contaminant levels in their fish. Ask at the fish counter, and they can tell you all about it. I also try to buy wild caught fish when appropriate (e.g., salmon), although fish like tilapia, for example, are found to be okay when farmed.
 

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He need the fat and protein for brain development. It sounds like his diet is pretty well rounded so I wouldn't worry. At leat he's not reaching for the cheetos<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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my 20mo ds loves meat and eggs and i don't consider this to be a problem. they are very nutrient dense foods. ds eats 2 eggs for breakfast almost everyday. don't throw out the yolks! there are so many nutrients found there. i do make sure that he eats only (well mostly) grassfed meats and cheese, right now i buy the omega-3 eggs but in a couple more months our chickens should start laying. i say ditto to all the posters who've directed you to westonaprice.org.
 

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Mine is like this too. Her favorite foods are eggs, fatty uncured bacon, and chicken sausages. Some folks already beat me to the traditional foods info, but I concur. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Shanana</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8181338"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">It sounds like your main concern is about the nutritional impact of eating a diet high in animal products. The general consensus in American culture is that animal products are bad for you, but I have started to think differently about this in the last year or two. If you think about it, humans evolved as hunter/gatherers. This means we survived on the animals we could catch and kill, and fruits/vegetables/roots that could be gathered. If we were near water we ate fish. And we probably ate bugs too (not something I'm excited about adding to my diet <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">). The point is, depending on what part of the world they lived in, some primitive peoples subsisted almost entirely on meat and animal blood (not so much dairy or eggs, which require animal domestication). Studies of bones & fossils indicate that when humans became agrarian (and therefore greatly increased the amount of grains and dairy products in their diet), levels of disease skyrocketed (there was a fascinating thread on the <a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/forumdisplay.php?f=365" target="_blank">Traditional Foods forum</a> a while back on this, that you can read <a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?t=546187" target="_blank">here</a>, and here is another <a href="http://home.iprimus.com.au/rboon/PaleolithicDiet.htm" target="_blank">link</a> with interesting information on the benefits of a paleolithic diet).<br><br>
So I have started thinking that meat is not as bad for you as we are led to believe (I'm still undecided on dairy). There is a caveat, however. The animals we eat for food are raised in conditions so far from what is natural for them, that it actually CAN be bad for you to eat that meat. For example, cows were designed to eat grass, not grain (and whatever else is added to the chemical soup they're fed while crammed into a feedlot). This fundamentally changes the composition of their meat. Studies show that grass fed beef has much higher levels of healthy fatty acids and lower levels of "bad" fats when compared to grain fed beef (for more information on this, and just a fascinating read in general, I recommend <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FOmnivores-Dilemma-Natural-History-Meals%2Fdp%2F1594200823%2Fref%3Dpd_bbs_sr_1%2F102-9433082-1672150%3Fie%3DUTF8%26s%3Dbooks%26qid%3D1179771630%26sr%3D1-1" target="_blank">The Omnivore's Dilemma</a>). Don't be fooled by the stuff at Whole Foods, either ... their meat is raised without steroids, antibiotics, hormones, etc., but unless it says "grass fed" on the sign, they were still fed grain.<br><br>
So one thing you could do is try to buy meat that was raised "naturally" (which also happens to be more humane, and is usually as good as, if not better than, organic). This means grass fed beef (which I occasionally find at WF, and recently saw at Trader Joe's for an exceptionally good price), free-range chickens (not chickens who are kept in huge sheds with one tiny door at the end that leads to a tiny patch of grass and isn't opened until they're many weeks old anyway, and so acclimated to their environment that they won't go outside -- again, read The Omnivore's Dilemma for more on that one), etc. It isn't always easy to find this type of food, and yes, it will cost more, but it will be healthier for your family. You can get onto the <a href="http://www.westonaprice.org/index.html" target="_blank">Weston A Price website</a> for links to help you find resources, local farms, etc.<br><br>
When it comes to things like dairy and eggs, these were not traditionally a part of the human diet (and I'm talking tens of thousands of years ago), but they are undeniably a part of our diet and culture now, so I try to find ways to make them "healthier". This means I try to get milk, butter and yogurt from cows that were pastured (grass fed). Organic Valley farmers try to pasture their cows when they can, and I am also seeing more and more dairy products at Whole Foods that are labeled grass fed. Just as this affects their meat, it also affects their milk. Non-homogenized milk is even better (read The Omnivore's Dilemma for more <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1">). Raw dairy products are even better (access to this depends strongly on where you live). I try to get eggs from local farmers, so I know how the chickens are cared for and what they're fed. You would be amazed at how different farm eggs taste and look when compared to grocery store eggs. And again, analysis shows the nutritional content to be vastly different when chickens are allowed to live and eat as they should, compared to how they're raised in factory farms.<br><br>
Of course, none of this addresses the philosophical reasons for not eating animal products (living more lightly on the earth, less pollution, humane treatment of animals, etc.), but it seemed that your concern was mostly about health.<br><br>
The Traditional Foods forum is dedicated to this type of eating, so you could find lots of info there. The Weston Price website has tons of information, and Nourishing Traditions is one of the common books/cookbooks devoted to this type of diet (although there are others).<br><br>
It's all a bit overwhelming, and I don't pretend to understand it all. I am nowhere near to eating the way I think we <i>should</i> be eating, but I am taking small steps, trying to buy more local products, grass fed beef and dairy, local eggs, etc. I think doing that, while still letting your ds eat as he chooses, would be one way to mitigate or eliminate the health concerns you're worried about.<br><br>
Good luck!</div>
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while all that may be true. Correct me if Im wrong but They didn't live very long on those kinds of diets,right??<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/duck.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Duck">: . In places where they've lived vegetarian or had very little meat in their diets didn't they live longer?
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">I'm really scared that he's going to develop some sort of heart disease / diabetes / what not from eating so much animal fat.</td>
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It's widely believed that heart disease and diabetes are not products of a diet high in animal fat, but one too high in carbohydrates. In many individuals, too many carbohydrates leads to an excess of insulin, which has been shown to have an impact on hardening of the arteries, plaque buildup, and eventually, diabetes. A lot of reasarch has shown that diets that are low in carbohydrates, yet high in fats, do not cause these problems.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mamachandi</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8183453"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">while all that may be true. Correct me if Im wrong but They didn't live very long on those kinds of diets,right??<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/duck.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Duck">: . In places where they've lived vegetarian or had very little meat in their diets didn't they live longer?</div>
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As I said in my previous post:<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Shanana</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8181338"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Studies of bones & fossils indicate that when humans became agrarian (and therefore greatly increased the amount of grains and dairy products in their diet), levels of disease skyrocketed (there was a fascinating thread on the <a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/forumdisplay.php?f=365" target="_blank">Traditional Foods forum</a> a while back on this, that you can read <a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?t=546187" target="_blank">here</a>, and here is another <a href="http://home.iprimus.com.au/rboon/PaleolithicDiet.htm" target="_blank">link</a> with interesting information on the benefits of a paleolithic diet).</div>
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So my understanding is that humans on a paleolithic diet (hunter/gatherer, which typically, although not always, included a lot of meat) were actually much healthier than those on a neolithic/agrarian diet (less meat, more grains, more dairy). Which makes sense, since a paleolithic diet is the diet we evolved to eat <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug">. As for the specifics of life expectancy, it was addressed to some extent in the thread I linked to in the TF forum. Someone mentioned that when you factor out things like high childbirth mortality rates (for both infant and mother) which were caused by things like infections due to not washing hands, etc., and had nothing to do with diet, then life expectancy hasn't actually changed all that much (at least in recent history). I never did get a clear answer on life expectancy for a paleolithic vs neolithic diet, but it would seem to me that if one experiences little disease on the paleolithic diet vs lots of disease on the neolithic diet, then life expectancy would be shorter with the neolithic (agrarian) diet <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug">. Of course, there were other dangers, such as being attacked by a wild animal, infected wounds, etc., which would also affect life expectancy, and those risks would probably be higher if one were hunting for survival vs farming. But that has nothing to do with diet.<br><br>
Now I'm off to finish my quesadilla from Qdoba, that has beans, rice, AND dairy, in addition to meat <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">. Hey, no one's perfect, right? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1">
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I loooooooove MDC mamas!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/loveeyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Loveeyes">:<br>
Thank you so much for all of the informative posts. I'm typically a paranoid person. So I worry about all sorts of things. Thanks for setting me straight. I'm glad that we buy natural / organic products as much as we can. I'm in NYC so waiting for some of the Green Markets to open up again.
 

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Thank you for being so thorough with your posts.<br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Shanana</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8183934"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">As I said in my previous post:<br><br><br><br>
So my understanding is that humans on a paleolithic diet (hunter/gatherer, which typically, although not always, included a lot of meat) were actually much healthier than those on a neolithic/agrarian diet (less meat, more grains, more dairy). Which makes sense, since a paleolithic diet is the diet we evolved to eat <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug">. As for the specifics of life expectancy, it was addressed to some extent in the thread I linked to in the TF forum. Someone mentioned that when you factor out things like high childbirth mortality rates (for both infant and mother) which were caused by things like infections due to not washing hands, etc., and had nothing to do with diet, then life expectancy hasn't actually changed all that much (at least in recent history). I never did get a clear answer on life expectancy for a paleolithic vs neolithic diet, but it would seem to me that if one experiences little disease on the paleolithic diet vs lots of disease on the neolithic diet, then life expectancy would be shorter with the neolithic (agrarian) diet <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug">. Of course, there were other dangers, such as being attacked by a wild animal, infected wounds, etc., which would also affect life expectancy, and those risks would probably be higher if one were hunting for survival vs farming. But that has nothing to do with diet.<br><br>
Now I'm off to finish my quesadilla from Qdoba, that has beans, rice, AND dairy, in addition to meat <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">. Hey, no one's perfect, right? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"></div>
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
So true. Although, he would eat it if there's an open bag. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngtongue.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Stick Out Tongue"><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>2mama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8181465"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">He need the fat and protein for brain development. It sounds like his diet is pretty well rounded so I wouldn't worry. At leat he's not reaching for the cheetos<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"></div>
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I really think full fat meat is fine and healthy for young children. it sounds like he is just a great eater!
 

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<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Deir</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8185848"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I really think full fat meat is fine and healthy for young children. it sounds like he is just a great eater!</div>
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I concur!
 
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