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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can somebody please link me to some information on how brighter kids can excel in Montessori. In my panicked two-week-before-registration-how-can-you-pull-this-on-me-now state all I can find is information on children with learning disabilities which will not go far in helping convince DH.
 

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I've always been under the impression that one of the great benefits of Montessori is that it allows children to progress at their own pace?<br><br>
Seems this type of setting would be most accomidating for bright children as they are not confined to any curriculum limits as they would be in a more traditional school setting.<br><br>
I could be off base though..I'm sure somebody else more versed on the subject will chime in soon!
 

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I don't have any published reports that I can help you with, but I have a very advanced/gifted/whatever almost 5 year old who is currently reading at a second grade level, doing "research" on various subjects, and insists on staying at school for as long as possible to do her work.<br><br>
The teachers will give your child lessons according to her ability - the teachers at our school recommended that our child do two years of the extended day, and it has worked out really well. I do some outside enrichment activities too.<br><br>
Of course it depends on the school, but the Montessori method has worked really well for our child and I can't imagine an environment where she would be more challenged.
 

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When I was researching Montessori, I filed the following on my computer. You could prob get the original on the journal's web site. I have a very bright dd who is thriving at her Montessori pre-K!<br><br>
>>>>In the September 29 issue of the prestigious journal Science, there appears one of the first studies to scientifically test the impact of Montessori education.<br><br>
Montessori education takes a different approach from the traditional by employing multi- age classrooms, student-chosen work in long time blocks, the absence of grades and tests and a special set of educational materials. Some have criticized the method, saying that pre-K and primary students lag behind in reading and other skills.<br><br>
Dr. Angeline Lillard (UVA) was drawn to study Montessori education by its close alignment with research on learning. “I decided to do a study to see if it actually makes a difference,” Lillard said. Usually the home environment is the dominant influence in a child’s social skills but this research suggests that the Montessori education itself fosters improved social and academic skills.<br><br>
With Nicole Else-Quest (University of Wisconsin, Madison) she studied two groups of five- and 12-year-old students in Milwaukee, Wis. The parents of the students in the study had average incomes ranging from $20,000 to $50,000 annually. All parents entered their children in the school district’s random lottery for the Montessori school. The Montessori group attended a public, inner-city, traditional Montessori school. The control group attended another school because they were not selected in the district lottery.<br><br>
The results indicated that by the end of kindergarten, the Montessori children performed better on reading and math tests, as measured using the Woodcock-Johnson Test Battery that assesses letter-word identification, word attack and applied math problems. Montessori students also engaged in more positive interaction on the playground and showed more advanced social cognition and executive control. They also demonstrated more concern with fairness and justice. The Montessori 12-year-olds wrote more creative and sophisticated narratives, performed better on a test of social skills, and reported feeling a stronger sense of community at their schools, the authors said.<br><br>
“Inner-city children who attended a well-implemented Montessori program were found to have social outcomes that were superior to those of children attending traditional schools,” said Lillard.”And they had academic outcomes that were at least as good on all measures, and on several measures were better,” she added.
 

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Does a not-even-5yo really need that much challenge anyway?
 

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Usually critics of Montessori accuse it of being "too academic."<br><br>
What concerns him?<br><br>
Why not have a discussion with the school director and see what evidence she can point you to?
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>kaydee</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7233169"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Usually critics of Montessori accuse it of being "too academic."<br><br>
What concerns him?<br><br>
Why not have a discussion with the school director and see what evidence she can point you to?</div>
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this is the reason our dd does not attend a montessori any longer. it was wonderful for academics, but not so much for letting a kid be a kid (atleast the one our dd was at for a brief time). if its a concern over it not being challenging enough, then you don't really have much to worry about as long as the montessori approach would fit with your child's learning styles. i don't have any info though, so i'm not sure that's much help. maybe if he got to go to the school himself and see how things are done, and get a taste of what the kids are doing, and in montessori a big part is knowing *why* they do certain things. sometimes as parents, if we are so used to seeing things learned in one particular way, we don't even pick up on why on earth the kid would be doing this activity or whatnot, and don't even see how it is directly related to some kind of academic skill. ask for a demonstration of the materials also, that may help your dh.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank-you for all of the responses. All of what you are saying is my understanding as well, but he needs to see other sources outlining the benefits.<br><br>
The parent info night is next week and I will be speaking with the directress before hand to see if she can speak with him specifically about the academic aspect of it.<br><br>
Talk de jour - I agree with you generally speaking, but since DD is reading already, DH is concerned that k. is going to be a wasted year and she will be relearning the alphabet and colours etc. If she goes into French Immersion, that would allow her to learn something new. KWIM?
 

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Hi mamatojade,<br><br>
My parents put me in French Immersion for the same reasons. I could already read quite well before kindergarten and they thought I could use the extra challenge. I'm happy to have been in French Immersion but I also think I would have thrived in the Montessori environment as I loved learning and was very self-motivated at that age. That being said, I think the French gave me enough of a challenge that I never felt bored at school. Since you're in BC, you may also want to keep in mind the possibility of late immersion. I don't know if your district has it but some do. That way, your daughter could start out her education in montessori and when she gets older and moves into public school she could attend late immersion.<br><br>
Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>jseens</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7238021"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Hi mamatojade,<br><br>
My parents put me in French Immersion for the same reasons. I could already read quite well before kindergarten and they thought I could use the extra challenge. I'm happy to have been in French Immersion but I also think I would have thrived in the Montessori environment as I loved learning and was very self-motivated at that age. That being said, I think the French gave me enough of a challenge that I never felt bored at school. Since you're in BC, you may also want to keep in mind the possibility of late immersion. I don't know if your district has it but some do. That way, your daughter could start out her education in montessori and when she gets older and moves into public school she could attend late immersion.<br><br>
Cheers!</div>
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We don't have late entry in our district YET, but by the time she is in grade six we likely would. I am willing to make the gamble, he isn't so sure.
 

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Maybe what you need to do is find some other Montessori parents he can talk to in person. Maybe also some Montessori children he can meet and therefore see for himself how well they're doing.
 

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Try ERIC for academic papers on Montessori.<br><br><a href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/Home.portal?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=ERIC_Search&Clearme=true" target="_blank">http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal...h&Clearme=true</a>
 

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Here is the full text of that article from Science:<br><br><a href="http://www.montessori.it/home/pdf/scienceinglese.pdf" target="_blank">http://www.montessori.it/home/pdf/scienceinglese.pdf</a><br><br>
this is from Teacher magazine. You might have to login to see it, but it is free to register:<br><br><a href="http://www.teachermagazine.org/tm/articles/2006/12/01/03research.h18.html?clean=true" target="_blank">http://www.teachermagazine.org/tm/ar...tml?clean=true</a>
 

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It sounds like you're lucky enough to have two great options. Either way your dd will probably be fine. Going to parents night sounds like a good idea.
 

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I think in most cases Montessori is excellent for advanced students. I have heard that it is not the best for profoundly gifted students.
 
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