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Discussion Starter #1
It seems that in lesson 68, my daughter has hit a roadblock.<br><br>
This is where she learns to subtract half of a number - 10-5, 4-2, 18-9, etc.<br><br>
Up to this point, she had only been subtracting minus 2 from numbers and doing great. then we got to this point and she lost it, as in, there was no way I could get her to understand how these problems work.<br><br>
Should I instead just drill these so she memorizes them, instead of trying to work them out in her head? It was too overwhelming for her to try and contemplate 18-9. However when we memorized double numbers she picked it up pretty quickly by using flashcards and memorizing.<br><br>
so... Should we focus on memorizing these, and not work so much on actually working the problem out? The further into the lessons she gets, she'll be working on these problems lesson by lesson the more she learns to subtract.<br><br>
Should we have been focusing on memorizing all of the number facts up to this point? She had been memorizing some of them just from repetition, but many of them she still works out in her head. I figured it's more important that she learns how to work the problems out rather than memorize them.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I meant to do that... Is there a way this thread can be moved or should I delete and repost in the learning at home forum? so sorry.... I thought I was in the homeschooling forum when I posted this.
 

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Can you not have her count out 18 pennies, then take 9 away and then she can count the left of pennies to determine what she has left? Perhaps visual methods will help her figure it out a bit.<br><br>
good luck
 

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I taught my DD math using food. She loves food and caught on REALLY FAST!!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love"><br><br>
Dump out pile of crackers or raisins or whatever. Have her count it. Ask her to divide it in half (one for you, one for me). And so forth. I made up stuff all the time. Now she is older and we cook from recipes for math, etc. Use everyday language, not math terms, for awhile. Then, gradually have her do the same tasks and introduce the terminology you want her to learn. She gets to eat things along the way and it is fun. Makes learning far more exciting than memorization. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 

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Moving to LAH
 

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hi, we own saxon math 1. i purchased it for my little guy & we'll start it in the fall. in looking at the lesson, your child should have a cup of 20 pennies. let them use the cup of pennies to solve the problem. in lieu of pennies, you could also use cereal, erasers, beads, etc. or you could use the teddy bear counter from th k-3 manipulatives, etc. in looking at the lesson, it doesn't appear the object is to have mastered this - but rather it's introducing the concept still. no worries, your dd will get it <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> hth.
 

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Saxon does require quite a bit of drill. I would recommend spending a few minutes a day helping her memorize them.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
She does alright with visual stuff for a short time, but after a few problems she gets sick and tired of counting things to take away and counting what's left. We've been working a lot on counting backwards so she can subtract in her head or using her fingers.<br><br>
The flashcards that have to be made for the lesson were a total failure because she eventually just realized that the answer is the same as the amount being taken away, ex. 10-5=5, so she assumed that 10-1=1. I was afraid this would happen. The lesson went downhill from that point and we never finished it. Unless *I* screwed up and should have included the new cards in with the old ones, as we've just been reviewing new cards once the old ones have been memorized/easy to figure out (to avoid too much of the same thing, as there is already so much review in each lesson as is)<br><br>
I like the idea of visual stuff, but if it takes too long, and she has a lot of problems to answer (such as on the fact sheets), and she's used to working things out in her head, she gets overwhelmed and easily frustrated.<br><br>
The leap from going from subtracting 2 all the way up to 9 is confusing the heck out of her.<br><br>
Would it be wrong to just adjust the worksheets/fact sheets to reflect something she's recently learned, and let her learn how to subtract by half as she comes across the problem in a future lesson? Like, when she learns her -4 facts, we could then include 8-4... Or am I taking the easy road and just need to work through this with her?
 

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if she gets sick of counting with manipulatives, i would recommend a number line. it would be much easier & visually help her understand how numbers work together when adding & subtracting, ykwim? the memorization will come through lots of practice imho. as for adjusting lessons, yes! feel free to adjust them. feel free to park at an area for as long as you need too. i would not move on to lesson 69 if you feel like she needs a few days of review covering what she learned in lesson 68. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 
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