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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay I have some fabric and my girls are in dire need of dresses and nightgowns. I also have the patterns that I want for the pajamas and dresses (they are pretty simple).

HOW do I transfer the pattern onto other paper so I don't have to cut up my big pattern paper. I don't know how to explain this... I want to keep the whole piece of paper intact and trace the size I need onto some other paper so I can get all the sizes I need out of the main piece.
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Also I don't have a rotary cutter, should I? Would it make things easier?

PLEASE help me.
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I would cut out the biggest size and then place it on the paper you plan to use to make patterns. Trace the largest size. You now have that as a pattern. Cut the original pattern to the next size, trace, and you now have the second size as a pattern. Keep cutting and tracing the original pattern until you have all the sizes you need on pattern paper. As long as you start large and work your way down, it should work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hey I didn't think of that...thanks.


This doesn't solve my wish to keep the big piece of paper intact but maybe that is impossible?
 

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I really don't see how you could keep the big piece of paper intact. But, if you trace each pattern before you cut out the next smaller one, you will have a pattern for each size. Why would you need the whole pattern still? Another option is to take it to Kinkos and copy it on the large copier.
 

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I lay out wax paper and trace my pattern onto it then lay the the wax paper on my fabric and cut. I like keeping the original pattern intact. I also label the wax paper so I can reuse it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I don't know...there is something about an old pattern that is still intact. Yes I'm weird I already know that.


The wax paper is a good idea, I'm going to try that first. If it doesn't work I'm going to do the trace/cut/trace/cut trick.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by doelkers
I lay out wax paper and trace my pattern onto it then lay the the wax paper on my fabric and cut. I like keeping the original pattern intact. I also label the wax paper so I can reuse it.
Do you use a pen or just go by the marks made by the pen. I tried two diff kinds of pens and neither would write/stay on the wax paper.
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Go to your fabric store and buy Pattern Ease. It is with the interfacing. You lay it on top of the pattern and trace, you don't have to cut the pattern at all. A ball point pen works well.
 

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I asked the same question here. I learned to use plain old tissue paper and a highlighter pen to trace the patterns. It's worked out fine. I like that I don't spend time tracing patterns I might never use.
 

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Yes, pattern ease. Or interfacing works, but it is in narrow widths that probably would not be a problem with kids clothes pattern pieces. Good luck!
 

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I trace with a Sharpie...cut it out then pin that pattern onto my fabric to cut. The wax paper holds up pretty good with using the pins over and over.
 

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I know what you mean about intact patterns.


Since I usually use all the different sizes, I dont like to cut.

I use tracing paper (like carbon paper) and lay the pattern over top and trace the size I need with a crotchet hook or knitting needle. The pattern outline is left on the fabric for cutting and my pattern is still in one peice.

I hope that makes sense.
 

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I do the same, just trace the different sizes and use that for making my items.


I happened to get my hands on a roll of 'drafting paper' and because it's so translucent when laid on the pattern, I can easily trace the size and any instructions and markings onto it. If you can find mylar or other plastic that would work too, and would give you a very durable 'pattern', that's much nicer to use than tissue paper or other delicate papers, if you think you might use it again.
 
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