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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought some little plants this weekend. For now I have planted them in some planters I already had. But I am afraid they will be outgrown. I would love some advice so I can start looking for planters for the next stage if necessary.<br><br>
First, some herbs. I think these might end up being OK because I will pick off of them? I got Lavender, Peppermint, oregano and sage. Mostly because they all smell good and last year bugs ate my basil. I think these plants will stay small-ish but I'm not sure. For now they are rather tightly packed in this <a href="http://www.abigailbowles.com/gallery/albums/wpw-20070520/normal_May_172.jpg" target="_blank">rectangular planter</a>. Do I need to plan on moving these out into bigger pots at some point? THey are all "full sun" plants so I put them together.<br><br>
Next, the strawberries. I got 3 everbearing and 2 junebearing plants and put them all in <a href="http://www.abigailbowles.com/gallery/albums/wpw-20070520/normal_May_17_.jpg" target="_blank">this round pot.</a> I have grown strawberries before but never in a container. I wanted to get a strawberry pot but couldn't find one so this is what I have for now. Again I am not sure if they will outgrow this container or not. I know strawberries grow out and spread but I hope I can just get away with draping the plants over the edge of the pot as they grow - thoughts?<br><br>
Lastly, some flowers (which I'm not worried about) and a crookneck squash. This is in <a href="http://www.abigailbowles.com/gallery/albums/wpw-20070520/normal_May_174.jpg" target="_blank">a small-ish pot</a>. I know the plant will grow out a lot, but can I leave it in this pot and just train the stem onto something? Or will the roots need more room than this? Thanks!<br><br>
Finally, I am not sure about watering. Some of the plant instructions say to allow the soil to dry before re-watering, but I also read I should water a lot after transplanting. So does the "allow soil to dry between watering" take precedence over the "water after transplanting" business? Also how do I test for when to re-water. I know to press my finger in the soil but I'm not sure what I'm looking for. Finally is there a "rule of thumb" for how much water to add each time? Do I pour a little water in, let it soak, pour a little more in, let it soak - until it stops soaking in? Or until it slows down soaking in? To make matters more difficult the small pots don't have drainage holes - just a layer of styrofoam pieces in the bottom to give a "drainage" area for the water.
 

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Herbs will probably be okay. Maybe rotate the pot if parts of it keep getting more sun than others. If they really do go nuts and outgrow the pot, you shouldn't have much of a problem transplanting those - I seem to remember that those transplant well/okay (vs. cilantro that *detests* being transplanted).<br><br>
Strawberries should be fine. Looks like a big enough container, even for the plants to send out a few runners. The longest strawberry roots I've seen in my patch are about 8 inches; most roots were about 4-6 inches long. If you want to keep the runners, make sure they find dirt in the pot. If not, just snip them off. At the end of the summer just clean it up and mulch them and you should be good to go for next year. And by clean it up I mean pull off dead leaves, disconnect runners, basically make sure it's not a jungle. Jungles are not fun to deal with. Still cleaning up our strawberry patch that I neglected the last two years.<br><br>
No real advice about the flowers and squash, but those pots do seem a bit small to me. Of course I could just be used to spreading things out because we have a nice amount of garden, but still. I think you can successfully transplant squash up until it starts seriously flowering/before you see squash. I think. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Oh, I wouldn't necessarily be concerned about the flower roots outgrowing the pots, but the roots using up all the nutrients in the pot. Since they look small to me, it probably wouldn't take too long to use them up. Unless you add some compost or something, which would probably help.<br><br>
Keep watering (but not drowning) your transplants. Helps them get over the shock. Once the transplants aren't droopy and sad looking (I had a whole new 4'x12' patch of strawberries look like I killed them the first two days!) you can ease up on the watering.
 

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I would recommend re planting all of the stuff that's in the rectangular pot. The lavender will get huge, depending on the variety, up to 4' wide. Oregano can get very big too as well as the purple sage that you have. The mint will spread too and will do well in a big pot.<br><br>
I would put the squash in a larger pot too. yes, if it is a climbing variety you can have it grow up, but there is not enough room in that pot for the roots and the actual plant (it will get big!)<br><br>
Have fun!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>loree</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8183818"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I would recommend re planting all of the stuff that's in the rectangular pot. The lavender will get huge, depending on the variety, up to 4' wide. Oregano can get very big too as well as the purple sage that you have. The mint will spread too and will do well in a big pot.<br><br>
I would put the squash in a larger pot too. yes, if it is a climbing variety you can have it grow up, but there is not enough room in that pot for the roots and the actual plant (it will get big!)<br><br>
Have fun!</div>
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Thanks! I assume I have some time before re-planting? I killed all of my plants within 1-2 months last year so I am trying to avoid buying more pots until I know i have a chance of keeping things alive!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>lmonter</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8181033"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Herbs will probably be okay. Maybe rotate the pot if parts of it keep getting more sun than others. No real advice about the flowers and squash, but those pots do seem a bit small to me. Of course I could just be used to spreading things out because we have a nice amount of garden, but still. I think you can successfully transplant squash up until it starts seriously flowering/before you see squash. I think. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Oh, I wouldn't necessarily be concerned about the flower roots outgrowing the pots, but the roots using up all the nutrients in the pot. Since they look small to me, it probably wouldn't take too long to use them up. Unless you add some compost or something, which would probably help.</div>
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Thanks! That's a good idea about rotating the planters so they all get sun. It's a west-facing patio with an overhang so they get sun for about 1/2 the day. Of course they are not getting any today because it's overcast. But I think that's actually a good thing, they've had a nice gentle rain most of the morning. I hope it is not TOO much. That is a very good point about nutrients. I mixed a little bit of compost to each pot that a friend gave me but I'll look into various nutrients that can be added as they grow too. Thanks.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>loree</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8183818"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I would recommend re planting all of the stuff that's in the rectangular pot. The lavender will get huge, depending on the variety, up to 4' wide. Oregano can get very big too as well as the purple sage that you have. The mint will spread too and will do well in a big pot.</div>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/yeahthat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="yeah that">:<br><br>
All 4 of those herbs can over-winter, so consider next spring as well as this year. Lavender can get to bush size (it's a common landscaping plant around here). Mint can be very aggressive. I made the mistake of planting a mint with other things in a 1/2 barrel last year. Nothing but the mint survived the season (it crowded them out). This year the mint has taken over the entire barrel and is looking for more space. Definitely give it it's own pot. The oregano and the sage could probably manage to share that pot if you removed the other two, but might need transplanting later in the season or next spring.<br><br>
As to the strawberries, strawberry pots really don't provide enough room for the plants to spread out. I got the best results with my strawberries this year (I started with 2 plants about 6 years ago and now have over 3 dozen, most of them "babies" of the original plants). They are planted (in a rectangular pot) very closely together (2 inches or so as tiny babies). So close that I have no idea where one plant ends and another starts. This prevents the sun and wind from drying out the soil. They do grow over the edge of the pot a bit, but the runners stay within the soil. The pot just looks like one giant strawberry plant has taken it over. Every few years I have to dig them all up and divide them, but that's normal when container growing.<br><br>
I didn't see where you are, so I don't know how hot it gets... for me, with a temperate climate, I water about every other day during the summer. And it rarely breaks 85F (if it hits 85, I'm out there daily). I water with a hose, so I have no idea how much each plant gets. Most of my containers have dishes under them to catch the water, and I water them until the dishes are full. If it's been super hot, I'll go down the line, water everything till the dishes are full, then start back at the beginning and do it again (so the soil has time to absorb all the water in the dish and I fill it again to be sure it got enough). In the planters that don't have dishes, I water until the absorption slows down, i.e. in my half-barrels, I water, watch standing water form, stop watering, watch it absorb, repeat, until the absorption slows way down and there's water running out the bottom. For the plants without drainage, be very careful about overwatering, as constant standing water can cause root rot. For those, I usually water until I think it's done, then check it every day (instead of every other).<br><br>
HTH
 
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