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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm working on my freezer stash- I just thawed a few ounces and it's GROSS! Pretty sure it's high lipase.

Anything I can do aside from scolding?? Anything I can do to 'bring it down'??
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
BUMP...anyone, I really need to get this stash going before I start school again.
 

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nak
i had this problem too and honestly, the only thing that prevented my milk from going "bad" from high lipase was pumping every day since i never tried the scaliding. i am in school too and know it is hard but i used to pump in the middle of the night after she ate and got a TON that way. i also pumped first thing in the morning after she ate and that helped. check out info on the lll website and kellymom. i would look up the links for you but only have one free hand. hth
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This is from a Lipase thread that's on pg 3 right now:

http://www.kellymom.com/bf/pumping/l...essedmilk.html

A few mothers find that their refrigerated or frozen milk begins to smell or taste soapy, sour, or even rancid soon after it's stored, even though all storage guidelines have been followed closely. Per Lawrence & Lawrence (p. 781), the speculation is that these mothers have an excess of the enzyme lipase in their milk, which begins to break down the milk fat soon after the milk is expressed. Most babies do not mind a mild change in taste, and the milk is not harmful, but the stronger the taste the more likely that baby will reject it.

Lipase is an enzyme that is normally present in human milk and has several known beneficial functions:

Lipases help keep milk fat well-mixed (emulsified) with the "whey" portion of the milk, and also keep the fat globules small so that they are easily digestible (Lawrence & Lawrence, p. 156).
Lipases also help to break down fats in the milk, so that fat soluble nutrients (vitamins A & D, for example) and free fatty acids (which help to protect baby from illness) are easily available to baby (Lawrence & Lawrence, p. 156).
The primary lipase in human milk, bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL), "has been found to be the major factor inactivating protozoans" (Lawrence & Lawrence, p. 203).
Per Lawrence & Lawrence (p. 158), the amount of BSSL in a particular mother's milk does not vary during a feed, and is not different at different times of day or different stages of lactation. There is evidence that there may be a decrease in lipase activity over time in mothers who are malnourished.

What can I do if my storage problem is due to excess lipase? Once the milk becomes sour or rancid smelling/tasting, there is no known way to salvage it. However, newly expressed milk can be stored by heating the milk to a scald to inactivate the lipase and stop the process of fat digestion. Scald the milk as soon after expression as possible.


From that kellymom link.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by ladybugchild77
nak
i had this problem too and honestly, the only thing that prevented my milk from going "bad" from high lipase was pumping every day since i never tried the scaliding. i am in school too and know it is hard but i used to pump in the middle of the night after she ate and got a TON that way. i also pumped first thing in the morning after she ate and that helped. check out info on the lll website and kellymom. i would look up the links for you but only have one free hand. hth
Did you find there was specific amount of time that you could get away with storing it in the fridge before it 'turned'??

THat's going to be my next step is to pump and refrigerate a few ounces and test it daily/hourly??? and just see how long it lasts.
 

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I did that, I pumped out a few ounces and put it in the fridge, then tested it every four hours for smell and taste. I found that I had a little more than 48 hours before my milk turned. Also, my frozen milk turns before the end of the day, so it has to be thawed and used immediately.

I have since started pumping and scalding. It really doesn't take too much time, and it keeps it from going bad. I don't scald what I am going to use the next day, but I will be scalding anything I freeze, and what I pump on Fridays for Monday work.
 
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