Mothering Forum banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,067 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is it ever brought up that the risk of HIV transmission per act of receiving anal sex is quite high and it's relatively, very difficult for a MAN to catch sex from heterosexual sex?<br><br>
I know I am speaking to the choir but I wonder if these parents know that it's pretty hard for a man to catch HIV through heterosexual intercourse (obviously it happens -- but not in a growing, epidemic way in this country), and circumcision is not going to be protective if their son is going to receive anal sex.<br><br>
I personally believe the best way to prevent HIV with cultural practices is by strengthening the child's family of origin bonds, making sure the adult sexual partnerships have the best chance at long term success, and loving our gay sons the same as we love our heterosexual ones and including them in our churches, social networks, etc. I think circ harms the first two. The latter is cited as pretty important in a great book about the HIV epidemic by a gay activist, _ Sexual Ecology_.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,842 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>pigpokey</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11578949"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Is it ever brought up that the risk of HIV transmission per act of receiving anal sex is quite high and it's relatively, very difficult for a MAN to catch sex from heterosexual sex?<br><br>
I know I am speaking to the choir but I wonder if these parents know that it's pretty hard for a man to catch HIV through heterosexual intercourse (obviously it happens -- but not in a growing, epidemic way in this country), and circumcision is not going to be protective if their son is going to receive anal sex.<br><br>
I personally believe the best way to prevent HIV with cultural practices is by strengthening the child's family of origin bonds, making sure the adult sexual partnerships have the best chance at long term success, and loving our gay sons the same as we love our heterosexual ones and including them in our churches, social networks, etc. I think circ harms the first two. The latter is cited as pretty important in a great book about the HIV epidemic by a gay activist, _ Sexual Ecology_.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
I am not sure how often that comes up or when it does it often comes up in the context of 'some trial in some third world country showed...'. It is interesting you brought this up because about two weeks ago, it was reported in the <a href="http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-wellbeing/health-news/threat-of-world-aids-pandemic-among-heterosexuals-is-over-report-admits-842478.html" target="_blank">Times</a> that the WHO now believe the threat of a generalized epidemic in the heterosexual population outside Africa is over and that outside Africa HIV will remain contained to high risk sub populations. Interestingly, this has been a year of downgrading. Estimates of rates of infection have been reduced in many parts of the world and now CDC is <a href="http://news.google.com/news/url?sa=t&ct=us/1-0&fp=486780cf93da2b05&ei=mIpnSL6jJILM8ATb2MmqBQ&url=http%3A//www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/06/26/AR2008062603521.html%3Fhpid%3Dsec-health&cid=1224483415&usg=AFQjCNEx4UXCF7BbAkrrkww3fxLuEI2AEw" target="_blank">reporting</a> that in the US gay men are the only group that showed an increase between 2001 and 2006. As the article points out the most important thing is that we prevent future children from trivializing HIV thinking it can now be managed.<br><br>
As far as probability of transmission in any given serodiscordant couple it is about <a href="http://www.cirp.org/library/disease/HIV/gray2/" target="_blank">0.001%</a> for a single act (curiously it does seem to vary between populations). At least an order of magnitude lower if managed, which is proabably why the <a href="http://www.circumcisionandhiv.com/2008/02/swiss-recommend.html" target="_blank">Swiss researchers</a> found after an 8 year study that serodiscordant couples they studied found that the HIV- partner didn't become HIV+ if their partner was managing the infection even when condoms weren't used (that is to say the HIV+ partner wasn't infectious). Though I still recommend the condom.<br><br>
Now just for purposes of entertainment, you can consider that if we know a couple is seodiscordant the risk of transmission is estimated at 0.001 per act, (0.1%). And in the US the prevalence is 0.005 (0.5%) (not all of that is heterosexual). Which works out to pretty long odds (lets say 1/1,000,000 give or take an order of magnitude) which might be a bit lower still since the prevalence includes all subgroups but to be fair the risk of transmission is an average. So the take away message is the odds are long but that doesn't mean condoms and testing should be forgotten. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,969 Posts
I found it rather interesting that a good friend of ours, who has full blown AIDS (although now its being managed quite successfully-he got it from a tatoo and didnt know until he was almost dead), slept with his girlfriend for-no joke-THREE years while he had HIV and she never got it. They even had a baby together, who was also fine (and again, this was before he knew, so she never recieved anti-HIV drugs after birth). Its been 6 years now and his GF still tests negative, she definately didnt contract it.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top