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Hi! I notice most threads are about younger children, does anyone here home school older children? For those of you who follow a curriculum (formal or informal) ... Do they basically do independant study with some guidance from you? Or do you sit down and 'do school'? At what age did you make the switch or notice you personally were not doing as much 'teaching'?
 

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My oldest is 10. I think that Mothering.com is mostly about younger kids, so the homeschooling board ends up being mostly about younger kids, too.<br><br>
We are relaxed homeschoolers and my kids pick much of their own study matieral.<br><br>
I don't do much teaching with my 10 year old. I used to do quite a bit with her. She had LDs and a lot of things were hard for her when she was little. Now she's reached a point where things are building on what she already knows, so academics are getting easier for her as the material gets harder!<br><br>
This is pretty recent, though, so I think we are right on the cusp of the switch from more mom-teaching to independant study.<br><br>
One thing we are doing together right now is chemistry. She wanted to learn about it, and got a book and tried to read it, but couldn't make any sense of it. We are doing it together now with me making lessons plans and the whole cha cha.<br><br>
She really likes it when we all sit down together and do things. Her little sister needs more direct help, and while she and I work together at the table and my older DD wants to be right there with us. I can see us morphing into all sitting together -- with them working on their stuff and me reading a book or something like that.<br><br>
At the same time, I think that there will always be things we do altogether just because we like it that way. We sit on the couch together and they read books outloud, each reading one paragraph and then handing the book to the other one.<br><br>
For us there has been a change between me doing things with them because they needed help, to doing things together soley because it is fun.
 

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I'm currently homeschooling an 8th grader (13), a 5th/6th grader (10), and a K-1st grader (6). We do not follow a curriculum, but I do keep the house well stocked with books, workbooks (hand-picked by them), reference materials, art supplies, and stuff for projects, experiments, and hobbies. Those, along with cable modem internet, 300 tv channels, a wonderful homeschool group, living in NYC, and a little guidance from me make for an incredible education in my eyes. So I guess you can say they do independent study. I use the worldbook course of study as a guideline, checking off things every quarter or so (unfortunately, living in NY also means heavy-duty homeschool regulations).<br><br>
I will always be there to teach something if they need me. My oldest is starting high school in September (she only planned on homeschooling 8th grade) and has already asked me to go over some math with her. Ds (6) has begged to learn to read better, so I printed out a 22-lesson phonics program and he brings me a page a day to do with him. Dd (10) is a performer and will be singing in a couple of weeks at a national competition. She has me go over the song with her every day and asks for help with it. And they all still love read-alouds, and I'd love that to last as long as possible!<br><br>
I get what you're saying, though. Although I don't "sit them down and do school" or have a regularly set time for "teaching", I have noticed that they definitely get more self-sufficient as they get older. I would say right around age 10 my kids didn't need me helping them find stuff to do or sit right next to them while they did it. Then again, my oldest 2 went to school and it took a while for them to learn how to just "be". My ds (who only did preschool) is already very self-sufficient and very rarely needs me to oversee what he's doing.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Citymomx3</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8482930"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I have noticed that they definitely get more self-sufficient as they get older.</div>
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I've found the same thing, but individual personalities play a role too. My 12 y/o dd has always been very independent, and will arrange writing challenges for herself, or research whatever interests her, while my 16 y/o ds has always preferred to work alongside or with input from others. As far as ideas go though, dd is huge on debate and works out a lot of issues outloud, while ds is one to mull things over for a long time and then announce his conclusions.<br><br>
While we don't "do school," the way they need my assistance definately changed over time, with a huge leap occuring once they became independent readers. My youngest still needs me to look up information on the computer, help him find books that he wants from the library, read those books, magazines, etc. to him, read instructions for games and projects and experiments...but once they can read well, there's a whole new level of independence, and my role changes.
 

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I am currently homeschooling a 13yo and yes, it's pretty much an independant study type situation for the most part. For math I do *assign* her to work from a workbok every day, but she does it on her own asking for help when she needs it.<br><br>
This is the first year she's realy taken responsility for her education (by which I mean that I don't have to micromanage what she should be doing and listen to her complain about 9/10 of it) but I think in her case, it has more to do with her recovering from being in school then it does with her age. My 8yo has been able to (and in fact prefered) to work independantly from the begining, which for him was K.
 

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I am currently homeschooling 13, 10, and 7 year olds. There are definitely fewer supports in place as kids get older. I find that, at least in my area, as kids head toward middle school age more and more of them go back to brick and mortar school. Also all the play groups and co-ops seem to be geared to younger kids so most of their friends are neighborhood schooled kids. The neighborhood kids are more connected to school friends than ever before as hormonal concerns move front and center.<br><br>
It has been really helpful to me that moms from a couple of the on-line HS lists near me have gotten together and hired teachers for a few subjects. So my eldest has been in a small (secular) Latin class for several years and just finished his first math class. I am not thrilled with the math class as the teacher (a local junior college instructor) really doesn't get homeschoolers. Ya know, class at 8:30 a.m., many hours of homework, constant complaining about gaps from early years. My local community college accepts homeschool students at age 15 which we will definitely use for science and math because those are my weak areas.<br><br>
That said, I completely agree with the poster who said there is much more independence as they get older. We have never used a boxed curriculum and each year pick and choose materials. We will drop everything to work on something that has struck the interest of one of my kids. The huge downside of having my eldest doing scheduled classes is that there is so much less time available for him to do the things that catch his fancy.<br><br>
HTH
 

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I have 13, 10 and 8-year-olds, all somewhat academically advanced for their ages. Like others have mentioned, they're quite self-sufficient in their learning. Especially my eldest. We live in an area where the (institutional) high school situation is much weaker than the elementary school, so homeschoolers around here do not tend to gravitate towards the bricks-and-mortar school. Our little area of pop. 1000 has 6 high-school-age homeschoolers and 7 elementary-school-age homeschoolers -- a pretty balanced demographic, and certainly no expectation that kids will head off to school at age 13.<br><br>
Miranda
 

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My oldest is 29,hs through high school.<br><br>
I usually set them up with a syllabus for each course at the start of the semester.Review day is usually friday afternoons.The baby is napping and the other ones work on art or sci or history projects.We sit down and go over ALL they've done that week.This is when we review for any tests and I get to see what they're fuzzy on or where they might need help.<br><br>
This is our 18th yr hsing.Always had a high schooler,middle or elementary and toddler or baby,so at this point it's all pretty much the routine around here.
 

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I have been homeschooling for four years now - my older two will start 10th and 7th this year. My oldest does 90 percent of his work on his own...we have weekly planning and discussion meetings, but his work is his to plan, and complete.<br><br>
I have a kindergatner this year, so he will get the bulk of my hands on attention.
 
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