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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have never made soymilk myself and don't know if this is a really bad idea, so I need to seek the wisdom of people who make their own. If you've read my soy posts you probably know my biggest issue with soy is the phytate content. As I delve more deeply into the phytates research, I've been thinking about how soy milk can be improved.

The reason phytates in soy are a bigger problem than phytates in other legumes and grains is that soy has a very low natural level of the enzyme phytase that breaks down the phytic acid. You can soak, boil, and steam your soybeans and you will reduce your phytic acid very little. For other legumes there are effective soaking methods.

So my thought is -- why not add a high phytase grain like wheat to the soy in the preparation process? You would add 10-20% (or more
) wheat to your soy, soak it in very warm water for about 18 hours, cook it, and then make the milk. The wheat would be in there with the soy so it would be a soy-wheat milk.

What do you all think and does anyone want to try it?

Amanda
 

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I have not made soy milk myself either, so I can not directly answer your question. My thought though, would be to mix the soy with oats, rice, or almonds- that is if they have the phytase in them. The reason why I think this is because they are already used as alternative milk sources, and could be easily cut into the soymilk. Just my thought...
 

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That's an excellent idea Amanda. I just read about a study that used rye, wheat or buckwheat to degrade the phytic acid. It didn't occur to me to transfer it to milk, I'm sure it would work. I can't eat wheat and I'm sure rye/soy would be gross. But what about buckwheat? Could you use groats or would it need to be the whole seed? And how would it change the taste?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Buckwheat would be good. It would be best to grind it fresh. I have no idea what it would taste like and hope someone around here is brave enough to experiment and report back. I don't know about groats. There just isn't enough info on buckwheat.

In a week or two I'll have an e-course on phytates on my website for anyone interested. It'll be free of course and you'll learn about all kinds of tricks to reduce phytates in your foods. I'd like to include something on alternative milks since all of the milks are made from foods with phytates -- soy, rice, and almond. I'm still working on that (as you can see from this post).

The other option with soymilk that just came up in the TF forum is to ferment it after making it. That's an extra step, so the buckwheat option may be more practical (though fermentation is probably more effective).
 

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i guess my question would be, why would someone so concerned with soy be wanting to drink soy milk when there are other non-dairy milks available? or do rice and nuts have the same issues soy does (high phytate/low phytase)?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Good question. I have gotten a question about how to improve digestibility of soymilk. If someone is concerned about soy for thyroid or hormone reasons, they wouldn't drink it anyway and soaking with buckwheat won't matter. But if they drink soymilk and want to double their absorption of minerals, they might be interested in a phytate solution. I assume this could work for tofu too but I don't know how the flavor would be.

Rice and almonds aren't necessarily low in phytase (though I've seen no studies at all on almonds and phytase) but the way the milk is prepared won't necessarily break down the phytates. Rice milk is probably lowest, almond second, and soy third.

Amanda
 
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