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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/06/12/health/12baby.html

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"Health workers may be able to reduce the number of infant deaths by making regular visits before and after birth to the homes of pregnant women considered at risk.

That is the finding of a new study that looked at a Cincinnati home-visiting program for first-time mothers and their children. The study, led by Dr. Edward F. Donovan of the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, appears in the June issue of Pediatrics."
 

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Eh, I don't know about this one. It seems as though are only focusing on one group of "at-risk" mothers, instead of mothers as a whole-because older, wealthier, married mothers suffer from these problems as well. It also seems like a way to fish around for reasons to remove the babies of poor/young women. There is a program similar to the one described in the article that serves young mothers in my area. It's called "Healthy Start"-and I wouldn't reccommend then to anyone. They told my dh's ex-gf that if she co-slept with their son-or didn't buy him a crib-they would call CPS on her.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by angelpie545 View Post
Eh, I don't know about this one. It seems as though are only focusing on one group of "at-risk" mothers, instead of mothers as a whole-because older, wealthier, married mothers suffer from these problems as well. It also seems like a way to fish around for reasons to remove the babies of poor/young women. There is a program similar to the one described in the article that serves young mothers in my area. It's called "Healthy Start"-and I wouldn't reccommend then to anyone. They told my dh's ex-gf that if she co-slept with their son-or didn't buy him a crib-they would call CPS on her.
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A very good friend of mine did her internship with healthy start. Basically if you were a minority or a very young mother then you were considered to be at risk. I agree that not everyone who is young and poor is at risk and everyone who is older and wealthy is not. Plus I know for a fact that really put the thumbscres on for vaxing and crib sleeping. This is a very mainstream operation and I wonder if the cure is worse than the problem.
 

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Great. Thankfully, I'm having a homebirth this time. With a study like this out there, I can only imagine how much of a hassle it would be to refuse the home visit. They gave me enough grief last time.
 

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I had a problem where I didn't want to be in the program, I just didn't feel like visitors in my home because I was cozy lying in bed all day with my newborn. They called and called and finally told me if I didn't have a public health nurse come they would call somebody else to see me
...meaning c.p.s... My dh was taking alot of time of work and my mom was there to most days, helping with my toddler and when the nurse finally came she was looking at everything when she walked in and commented on how clean it was
and asked me a bunch of questions.. alot about my toddler and where she sleeps.. wtf, I thought it was about a newborn checkup!! Not a way to weasle into my life.
 

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Holy cow, sweetpea. The idea that not merely is this program out there, but that it can be forced on parents, is terrifying.

I had both my girls with a midwife birth center. They provided a home visit after every birth. This home visit wasn't intrusive at all - she pretty much came in, looked at the baby, did the heel stick, asked me if I had any questions (related to the baby or my own recovery). No talk about where the baby slept, vaccinations, the tidyness of my bathroom, nothing.
 

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Scary how they invade your life...
No more hospitals for me, period. I'd need a broken bone or internal bleeding...
 

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we would not be in this group -- not high risk

but

i do know a home visit would have been GREAT. I would have looooved one.

DS was small and we had to drag him out to the Ped 2 x in the first week to have his weight checked. a visiting nurse could have brough a scale.,

DS was slow to want to nurse -- a fight a real fgight to get him too -- any home visit to encourage or help would have been great ... we were on our own.

We had a doula, LLL learder actually, but we birthed 2 weeks before Thanksgiving, she didn't do her home visit till after Thanksgiving. like 16+ days after the birht

I know programs like this can be BAD BAD BAD BAD -- and they get screwed up...................but think how great a program like this COULD BE??????? if done well????????

another thing.................to consider .............while this program might suck , a good program could be created and this about this .............there are a lot of moms out there that are not as well educated as the moms here. or who don't hav the support.

A goosd BF home visit program could pervent a lot of moms failing in BF due to lack of support, envcouragement and knwodlege when faced with common issues (baby wants to eat every 20 minutes, must not be getting enough, give formual...)..

this what a home visit program could mean to babies at real risk -- liek the poor thing recently that died from being fed nothing but limited soy milk.

I know most of this preograms suck -- but i do see how there could be good ones and hoe helpful they COULD be if done right.

Aimee
 

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We had one with our first and she talked about stuff like infant massage and how babies need to be held and touched a lot. She was great. It's so sad that her attitude is a minority one in these programs.
 

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DS1 was a NICU baby, so we had homevisit a few days, maybe a week after he came home. For us, there was no real pressure--it was mainly to check to see that we had adjusted well to having him home and that we were all doing ok. If he hadn't had a weight check at the dr, I seem to recall they would bring a scale, but it was not bad. We did talk about bf (I was pumping and bottlefeeding because he was unable to nurse at the time) and she was encouraging. I don't recall any sleeping area questions, but we had a bassinet in view in the LR for naps, and he slept with us as night, per our neonatologist and NICU nurses suggestion. She never walked through the house, we stayd in the Living room, and she cooed over him. So, I agree, if done right, it could be really good. I also had access to a number where I could call her with any questions or concerns, or to find out info about community resources.

Also, slightly different, but we had 3 SW visits in the 6m after ds2 was placed with us for adoption that checked on similar things, offered advice, and answered questions. Basically, is everyone doing ok type stuff. We did have to answer questions about vax--but we had delayed/altered the schedule with our dr's ok, so it was sufficient for their requirement (we cerify with immigration when they enter the country that they will be vaxed as soon as medically appropriate, so this is a biggie in regards to program compliance and legalities). There were also questions about how he wa sleeping, wehre was not an issue, and cosleeping was encouraged for a variety of reasons (most Korean adoptees are used to it, it helps wtih bonding, etc).
 

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I did not enjoy the Healthy Start program (NY) and looking back I realize how condescending and mainstream it was. It was targeted at poor, minorities and young moms, not the more well to do moms with the private insurance.

It's a good idea on paper but to make something like this mandatory...that just doesnt' sit well with me.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Aimee21972 View Post
but think how great a program like this COULD BE??????? if done well????????

Absolutely. When the program is run correctly, I think it would be wonderful. What postnatal mom couldn't use a little support and advice? The problem with this specific program is that it makes a TON of assumptions about your ability to parent based on what color your skin is and how much money you have. Based on those assumptions you are then railroaded into "accepting help" from a stranger with a very strong personal agenda. Not cool at all. I think if any hospital or birthing center had an optional program where you could call and request a home visit from a nurse or SW or lactation consultant that would be great.
 

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I'd like to clarify that I didn't have any of the issues someone else mentioned. Neither of the home nurses I had (one with ds1, and one with dd) asked nosy questions or wanted to see the bedroom or anything like that. I'm just of a personality that doesn't like having strangers in my home, butting into my life. My kids were doing well, they didn't need to be weighed (healthy, thriving, and getting weighed at the well-baby checkup in two days, anyway). I had a few issues with breastfeeding, but I didn't want help. I wanted to be left alone to work it out without any well-meaning interference. (I've never had any "help" with breastfeeding that didn't end up screwing me up. When I finally ignored all the advice, with ds2, breastfeeding went like clockwork. I think it's great that help is available for moms who need it, but I know I'm not alone - maybe a minority, but not alone - in wanting to be left to establish that relationship with my baby without interference.)

The first nurse I had, with ds1, was very pleasant, very easygoing, and very complimentary. In fact, she erroneously assumed I must have done a ton of babysitting, and called me a "natural". I just felt there was no reason for her to be there. The nurse I had with dd was condescending and annoying. Her visit just added stress. I had c-sections with both babies and I really just wanted to be left alone to heal and bond without people getting in my face about sleeping positions, "checking" my baby's latch when he/she was nursing happily, asking me a bunch of questions about my surgical recovery (which I was trying to think about as little as possible), etc.

My real issue with the program developed when I tried to opt out of it with ds2. I had the liaison in my room for well over half an hour, badgering me and trying to talk me into accepting a visit. If they're so concerned for a new mom's peace of mind and ability to cope, why do they think harrassing us is acceptable?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I'd love to see them take something like this... and expand it with both the type of care providers (post-partum doulas, midwives, lactation consultants)... and the target audience. I don't think anybody should be forced to use it. But I think so many Moms could benefit from some in-home care... or just the convenience of having the first few well-baby checks at home. I know that living in NYC, with no car, the thought of having to hop the bus or subway with a 3-1/2 year old, 20 month old, and newborn is depressing.
 

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I had a home health nurse visit after the birth of my first son. She didn't really do a lot except pry into my personal life and scold me about underdressing my son for the weather. She wanted to know all kinds of things about my son's absent father, about my personal history and stuff. It was truly an intrusion on my privacy.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by umsami View Post
I'd love to see them take something like this... and expand it with both the type of care providers (post-partum doulas, midwives, lactation consultants)... and the target audience. I don't think anybody should be forced to use it. But I think so many Moms could benefit from some in-home care... or just the convenience of having the first few well-baby checks at home. I know that living in NYC, with no car, the thought of having to hop the bus or subway with a 3-1/2 year old, 20 month old, and newborn is depressing.
The bolded part is my only real issue. I wasn't technically "forced", but they sure do make it hard to say "no". I find it infuriating, particularly as they simply wouldn't listen. The woman just kept telling me what the program was like and what they'd do at the home visit and such. I pointed out several times that I'd had one of the visits just two years earlier, with dd, and it was like "yes, I know - so our nurse will be weighing the baby, checking your latch, blah, blah, blah". I'd be saying, "yes, I know - just like last time - I don't want it, thank you." over and over....soooooo annoying (esp. when I just wanted someone to come and take out the freaking staples and let me out).

From what I hear about breastfeeding rates, I do think home visits from an LC would be a huge benefit to many, many moms and babies (although, hopefully, not an LC like the one at my hospital last time!!).
 

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i know there are many many problems in teh current programs out there

but i also think of the wife of a co-worker of dh -- who got 20 minutes with an LC at teh birth, and she was not even holding the baby when the LC visites. she got left with a few pages of badly phot copid reading materal and that was it. I vivited at 2 weeks and she was useing shelds, hated them but didn't have a clue how to get off them. supplmenting with formula cuz the LC told her to expect a new born to eat every two hours adn the LC told her "it is not uncommon to have to supplement at first". so any time the child cried between two hour marks she gave forumal. she thought is what she as told byt eh LC..........i spent an afternoon with her, adn printed her out some well printed stuff from Kellymom.com and a week later she was soooooooooo happy, off the sheilds and had throw out the forumal. She told me she wished th LC had done as much to help her, or that anyone had come to check on her. I am 2 hours awy and ONLY BF mom she knows at all. A home vist at day 3 or 5 would have been great for her.

and I already said i would have loved one.

It is sad that whenever the current system fails eveyone throws up their hands and wishes it away

A
 

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Aimee...in the situation you describe, what would have been accomplished if the LC had come back to check on her? This wasn't simply a case of someone who didn't get help...she got misinformation from the person who was supposed to help her in the first place. Would the woman who told her she might have to supplement have seen it as an issue if she'd done a home visit and the mom was supplementing? I don't see how a home visit would have necessarily helped in this situation...

I have no problem with home visit programs...but they should be an option, not a requirement.
 

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They do this in Switzerland. For every woman who has given birth. A nurse (who is also a certified LC, as all my nurses were at the Klinik where I gave birth) will come to your house for the visit and answer any questions/concerns, give you advice and handy tips about BFing, check your latch if you are having problems, weigh baby and give you information regarding follow-ups at the monthly clinic usually located in or near the city hall should you have questions/concerns before your next visit to the pedi. They don't discriminate against BFing or FFing, but I can say that both times they visited me I got very pleased smiles when I said I was BFing. It is a very well run program that you don't have to take advantage of (we have a great pedi, so I didn't use them but for the first obligatory visit) but I can't see it ever going over well in the US since there is still such a problem with the attitude toward BFing and APing. Plus, we're not running scared of CPS, a service that, while effective in some cases, still seems to abuse its power in the US.
 
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