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Discussion Starter #1
We are in the process of a domestic infant adoption. Our first child was 2 years old when we adopted him so I didn't need to make a decision on which formula to use. My first choice is to have a friend donate milk or second to use a milk bank. For various reasons these ideas aren't going to work out. The Nourishing Traditions Cookbook has a recipe for infant formula. Has anyone on this list tried making it? Can it be frozen? Help, what am I going to feed this baby.<br>
Thanks,<br>
Shawn
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lurk.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lurk">:
 

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Gosh, I honestly would not chance making my own formula. There are just so many vitamins and things. I'm pro-breastfeeding whenever possible, but it was not an option for us. We had grandiose plans of only using one of the organic formulas. Have you considered that? Of course, bringing home a 7.5 month old with her own opinions threw a wrench in that plan! We do a mix of organic and another because she refuses the 100% organic one.<br><br>
Holli
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Holli,<br>
The author of the book I mentioned makes a compelling case for not using massed produced canned formula that is overly processed, which destroys most of the nutrients. However, I did consider using organic canned formula but I can not find some for infants. The only organic formula I found is for 12 months or older. Which brand are you using and do you know if it is available in the U.S.?<br>
Thanks, Shawn
 

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I researched this quite a bit and as far as I could determine the organic formulas are only labeled like that because they do not want to compete with breastfeeding! They strongly support breastfeeding for at least 12 months, which is why they purposely market their formula for post 12 months.<br><br>
Holli
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Holli,<br>
Thank you. I didn't know this. I read 12 months and moved on. Our ped. is fine with the homemade stuff but I'm going to look into the organic stuff some more. Can you tell me where you read your information?<br>
Thanks again,<br>
Shawn
 

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There are two organic formulas available. They both say they are for "toddlers" but they are also just fine for infants - it's a marketing issue. One is made by Horizon, and one is called Baby's Only.<br><br>
The sweetener in Baby's Only is rice malt, which I felt was a much better sugar choice than corn syrup or cane sugar (it's less refined.) You can buy Baby's Own at several whole-foods type chains, and also there are many on-line sources. They also make a soy formula, but there's a whole issue with phyto-estrogens and soy that led me to believe that a cow's milk based formula would be preferable.<br><br>
The downside is that it costs a third more than conventional formula. Oh well. It's not forever. Now that my daughter's a toddler, she drinks organic cows milk and fortified rice milk.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you ladies. Using canned formula is going to really safe me a lot of work. Do either of you have a suggestion for the best price. I did a quick search on the internet and the cheapest price was $8.77 per can. I know each baby is different but how long do you think a can should last? I realize as the baby gets older they will eat more.<br>
Shawn
 

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We use Horizon, and the cheapest I ever see it (for the large can) is $29.99. The smaller can is usually about $16. The Baby's Only is, I think, about the same price. I'd be a little wary, frankly, of organic formula that is being sold for as little as $8.77 a can. That seems awfully cheap even for the non-organic kinds.<br><br>
Anyway, I know that Horizon is generally only available on the west coast (not sure why, though). But I know many adoptive parents who use Baby's Only. Marimami is correct that they specify "over 12 months" in order to better advocate breastfeeding. But both brands are perfectly good for little ones.<br><br>
ETA: As for how long a can should last...At our daughter's peak formula consumption, I'd say a large can lasts us about a week, maybe more like 6 days depending on her intake.
 

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There are two organic formulas as far as I've ever been able to determine, Baby's Only (made by Nature's One) and Horizon. Both meet FDA requirements for infant formula (those requirements have mostly to do with levels of macro nutrients -- carbs, proteins, fats, etc -- and macro nutrients, including vitamins/minerals). But both are not FDA certified for infant use -- only Horizon is.<br><br>
When I researched this many years ago, my assumption about Baby's Only (<a href="http://www.naturesone.com" target="_blank">http://www.naturesone.com</a>) was that they were not labeling for infant use -- even though they met the requirements -- for pro-breastfeeding political reasons. And I have a hunch that the folks on staff there are very pro-breastfeeding and don't want to encourage moms to opt for formula instead of b'milk in the first year of life or even beyond. But the whole story is more complicated than that.<br><br>
Getting FDA approval for infant-formula labeling is an extremely expensive process that is a major hurdle for a small company like Nature's One. I believe that they have not secured that labeling certification in large part because of financial reasons. Horizon is a bigger company with greater resources and may have calculated that it was very much worth it -- esp. since it would have given them a marketing leg-up over the better-established Nature's One product. Horizon could then use their well-established distribution channel to recoup their costs efficiently. (I'm speculating here, and am not an expert on the financial profile of either company!)<br><br>
The Horizon formula is WAY more expensive than the Baby's Only. The former retails for about 16 bucks a can, I believe; the latter for about 10 bucks a can. By buying Baby's Only in bulk at my food co-op on online, I get it around 9 bucks a can. I don't know if Horizon charges so much merely because they can get away with it or because they need to to recoup their FDA certification costs. I do not believe they do it because it's a better product.<br><br>
The Nature's One company has been wonderful to deal with. They have a very informative Web site and a staff nutritionist who has answered many of my questions regarding food allergies.<br><br>
On another note, someone here mentioned that Nature's One's Baby's Only formula contains DHEA. I think that person meant DHA, which is an essential fatty acid that is associated with brain/eye development (and the entire omega-3 family and a healthy balance between omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids is critical for a healthy inflamatory-response system). The Baby's Only formula DOES NOT contain DHA (or DHEA [a hormone], for that matter). It does contain alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) and linoleic acid (LNA), the first fatty acids in the omega-3 family. ALA is a precursor EPA and DHA, but it is unclear whether infants can efficiently convert those precursors to EPA and DHA. Nature's One makes a DHA/ARA supplement that is derived from egg-yolk phospholipids. More info on their Web site.<br><br>
I used the supplement for my daughter for about a year and a half until she was diagnosed with egg-white allergy. I could probably continue using it, since the chance of cross-contamination with egg white is small, but I've been chicken about doing so. On the other hand, I'm having a hard time finding a good fatty acid supplement for her because she is also at very high risk for fish/shellfish allergy, and most of the omega-3 supplements are derived from fish oils . . . need to do more research. Ah well, at least her basic dairy formula contains two important fatty acids/precursors!
 

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my old nanny could make formula - she was from Africa so they fortified alot of the formula for the older babues - this woman could get bananna, eggs you name it into a bottle - liquid.<br><br>
I used to play around and I could get cooked organic egg yolk into formula, also I heard carrot juice was good so I used to juice some and add it....also omega 3-6-9 (my dh used to hate that smell <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> and probiotics. I breastfed except one bottle a day (after jaw surgery wired shut when he was 8 weeks old ) so I tried to make that bottle as good as possible...<br><br>
the egg of course not until 6 months. It takes some getting the hang of it but you basically seperate the egg yolk and slowly add boiling water...and stir, if you do it 'right' the egg stays liquid and can pass through a nipple.
 

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With all due respect to those of you who object to all processed foods including formulas, I would be extremely wary of formulating a milk substitute for an infant using any food that is highly allergenic, including egg. (Yes, I know, egg yolks aren't allergenic to the extent that egg whites are, but it's hard to avoid cross-contamination.)<br><br>
I knew my biological child was at increased risk for food allergies because I have various allergies (although no known allergies to food). Turns out he was allergic to fish and egg.<br><br>
My adopted baby "should" have been at less risk for allergies according to the parental health history we got. But we didn't get the whole truth, for reasons I can only speculate about. Turns out her b'mom has severe, life-threatening food allergies that she did not disclose, and her b-baby has inherited them. My daughter is allergic to egg, peanut, nuts, and at high risk for shellfish. And that doesn't include the non-food allergies!<br><br>
I would encourage all adoptive parents to consider delaying the introduction of major allergens if medical histories are incomplete or there's any reason to believe the child is at elevated risk for food allergy.
 

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T. Elena, I was going to say what you just said, but didn't know quite how to phrase it. Even though my daughter's birth mom didn't list any food allergies in her family's medical history, I don't want to take any chances. Personally, I would never consider making my own formula (for a newborn or very young baby anyway), but that's just me.<br><br>
Also, I wanted to retract what I said about being wary of $9/can formula. I didn't realize Baby's Only only came in the smaller cans and usually goes for about 10 bucks a can. So, $8.77 would be a good price, I should think!
 

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Hi,<br><br>
I am just popping in to state my opinion. I strongly advice against home-made formula for a very young infant, or for an infant whose sole source of nutrition is the formula. Home-made formulas are best for babies who just need supplementing but who normally get breastmilk. I know it's appealing to make your own, to know exactly what's in it. But it's just not safe. Sorry, there's no other way to put it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/hug2.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Hug2"><br><br>
My dd is tube-fed and I understand that desire to nourish your baby with your own hands by making food for him or her, rather than popping open a can of formula. It hurt me so much to not even be able to feed her a bottle while she nestled in my arms so I researched ways to heal this by making her own food. It's just not adequate for total nutrition for the first year of life. (Older children who are tube-fed can be fed a blenderized diet but this does not apply to babies.)<br><br>
My oldest was also ff after 6 mos. I pumped for her as we were unable to make bfing work, but then she went to non DHA-ARA formula and today she's a bright and healthy girl. We bonded very well with her bottlenursing in my arms until she was 17 mos and self-weaned.<br><br>
The DHA-ARA thing is debatable. THere are many babies with especially sensitive tummies who cannot handle DHA-ARA very well. Mine was one of them. She is fine now, but intitially she wasn't tolerating that and I was grateful to find generic brands that didn't have it added in.<br><br>
I wish you the best of luck and love and joy with your new baby-to-be! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love"><br><br>
By the way, there is a tribe here for mamas who were unable to bf. You might want to go check it out. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"><br><a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?t=48728" target="_blank">http://www.mothering.com/discussions...ad.php?t=48728</a>
 

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I would be VERY wary of adding egg to ANY formula. Not only is there an allergen issue, but there is also a HUGE salmonella issue! The last thing you want is an infant suffering from food poisoning–even a mild case of it and salmonella has been found in even organic raw eggs.
 

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I'm a soon to be adoptive mom and I'll be breastfeeding and supplementing with donor breast milk. I have asked the donors to take the same blood tests a donor milk bank would ask for and I'm not worried about having to pasturize the milk. Most of my donors are from this site and all are nursing their own babies so I'm sure they will not be doing anything to harm their own children. I think it is a way better option than formula. Any reason why you can't get donor milk?
 

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A friend of mine was unable to breastfeed and made her own formula with raw milk and various EFA sources. I feel that she took a risk on food poisoning, but not more of a risk than I took by using pasteurized milk than had been nutritionally depleted. Her daughter thrived on homemade formula. I think it's a call that each mama must make for herself, between the possibility of not providing appropriate nutrition with homemade stuff and the certainty of providing way-less-than-ideal nutrition with highly processed commercial formula.<br><br>
I had to stop bfing at nine months, so my baby had goat milk plus vitamin and EFA supplements, but I did not knock myself out trying to make formula. If (God forbid) I cannot nurse my next baby, I would make a formula based on goat's milk. I think it is much easier to digest than cow's millk. For a very young baby, I would seek out certified raw milk rather than settling for pasteurized milk.
 

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I don't know where you would get it in the U.S., but in Europe and elsewhere, you can get organic formula with probiotics added. The probiotics cut down on the diarrhea that FF babies can get and make it easier to digest. You could also use Horizon or Baby's Only and add your own probiotics.
 

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I know there are some people who have used goat's milk, though it cannot be used as a formula without adding some things. I have not done this myself (though I have used it as a supplement).<br><br>
Here are some links if you want to check this out.<br><br><a href="http://www.saanendoah.com/compare.html" target="_blank">http://www.saanendoah.com/compare.html</a><br><br><a href="http://www.askdrsears.com/html/3/T032400.asp" target="_blank">http://www.askdrsears.com/html/3/T032400.asp</a><br><br>
Notice Dr. Sears doesn't really recommend it as a first choice, but tells you to work closely with your dr. to use goat's milk as an alternative if baby cannot tolerate other milks.
 

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Just wanted to add that the baby's only has free shipping if bought by the case (which is the only way it makes sense <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"> )<br>
I did add a pro biotic in the form of Aloe vera juice to most of his bottles.
 
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