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I have a question about yards. Specifically about that strip of grass between the street and sidewalk that some neighborhoods have. I don't know the proper name. I've heard "tree lawn," boulevard, grass strip...<br><br>
Say you have a house. Your front yard property line goes up to the sidewalk. Then between the sidewalk and the street is a grass strip about 5 feet deep. Technically that grass area is not part of your property (but you are expected by the city to maintain it.)<br><br>
Can you plant on this strip? We just bought a house, and there is a large strip of grass, 5 feet wide and about 30 feet long, in front of the house between the sidewalk and the street. I really want to plant several fruit trees on it with some raised garden beds in between. Is this allowed?
 

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It's called a road allowance. Technically, a persons land doesn't start right at the road, all lots have a road allowance but not all of them are as clearly defined.<br><br>
You can plant what you want there if it's not a violation of an HOA or strata, but understand that because it is government property if they decide to dig that up for whatever reason (such as maintenance on water pipes for instance) they are not going to re-plant anything or reimburse you for it as you technically gave it to the government.<br><br>
At least, that is how it is in Canada. You can do what you want with the road allowance in front of your home, but the government can just come by and remove/replace/dig up, fix and fill without your consent and without replacing anything.
 

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In Australia it's called the nature strip and some people have started planting vegie gardens in them <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
No help at all in answering your question, I just think it's a cool thing to do.
 

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Other than trees, people usually plant what they wish with that strip. Our city maintains the trees with a ferocity, but not everyone's blvd has a tree. I know a person who has made a gorgeous rock garden with theirs. We don't do anything with ours. Just keeping up with the rest of the yards is hard enough.
 

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You can plant there but check for where the water/sewer pipes are because of the roots. Also, dogs usually pee/poop on there (in my town), so flowers might not do so great!<br>
We put trees on ours.
 

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You should ask your city/ town/ county government this question, too, in case there are local ordinances about it.
 

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Also, remember if they put chemicals on your street for snow removal. There is a possibility of getting into the soil of that area. So be careful planting fruit trees or anything you are going to eat.
 

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I would also check with your city and/or HOA for requirements.<br><br>
Do you have overhead power lines? If so, buy trees that won't reach them or the city will trim them and then they look stupid. Drives me crazy!<br><br>
You can put up burlap to block the salt/etc from the road in the winter - especially until the trees get established.
 

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Concerning trees, should you have a desire to plant one in the strip -<br><br>
In our town, any tree planted in that strip must be approved by the borough's tree commission. This is to assure people plant something appropriate that won't harm the water and sewer lines or the sidewalks. The upside is often the borough will give you a tree, selected from a long list of town-friend types, for free and plant it for you.<br><br>
The veggie garden idea delights me!
 

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I would think twice about planting edibles (vegetable garden, fruit trees, herbs etc.) along the road. Too much contamination from heavy metals and other toxins from car exhaust, oil leakage, garbage truck spillage, etc. I think the recommendation is to plant 6 to 10 feet from traffic.<br><br>
If you are planting ornamentals, then I think your only concern is that the municipality could dig them up at any time for road work, new sewer or storm drains, etc. You cannot expect any compensation if that happens.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>lolar2</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15369218"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">You should ask your city/ town/ county government this question, too, in case there are local ordinances about it.</div>
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>ChristyMarie</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15369282"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I would also check with your city and/or HOA for requirements.</div>
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These are the best advice you've received. Several posters here seem to be making generalizations over fairly large geographic areas. But this is exactly the sort of situation that would vary significantly from one local government to another.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>MusicianDad</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15369028"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">IYou can plant what you want there if it's not a violation of an HOA or strata, but understand that because it is government property if they decide to dig that up for whatever reason (such as maintenance on water pipes for instance) At least, that is how it is in Canada. You can do what you want with the road allowance in front of your home</div>
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Perhaps I'm not understanding your use of the word "strata" here, but I think this statement is too general. In many cities, you must mow this strip of grass, but the city will pile snow on it in the winter and subsequently use a powered broom on a tractor to clean it in the spring. (ie. it's shared maintenance). I can't see a civic department being too keen on fruit trees and raised beds in their way - even if they can freely destroy those plantings with no responsibility to replace or financially compensate the homeowner.<br><br>
"Road allowance" use in Canada is not as unrestricted as described here. For example, if a road allowance is a natural wet zone, in some parts of Canada it becomes a "protected waterway" for water fowl habitat. Individuals are prohibited from removing vegetation, draining water, etc. This example would more frequently occur in rural settings than cities, but may apply. Just because road allowance is public land, doesn't mean an individual can use it as he/she sees fit.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>ollyoxenfree</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15369406"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I would think twice about planting edibles (vegetable garden, fruit trees, herbs etc.) along the road. Too much contamination from heavy metals and other toxins from car exhaust, oil leakage, garbage truck spillage, etc. I think the recommendation is to plant 6 to 10 feet from traffic.<br><br>
If you are planting ornamentals, then I think your only concern is that the municipality could dig them up at any time for road work, new sewer or storm drains, etc. You cannot expect any compensation if that happens.</div>
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I agree. And they spray all the time for mosquitos here. I don't want that near anything I'd eat!
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Novella</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15369520"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">These are the best advice you've received. Several posters here seem to be making generalizations over fairly large geographic areas. But this is exactly the sort of situation that would vary significantly from one local government to another.<br><br><br><br>
Perhaps I'm not understanding your use of the word "strata" here, but I think this statement is too general. In many cities, you must mow this strip of grass, but the city will pile snow on it in the winter and subsequently use a powered broom on a tractor to clean it in the spring. (ie. it's shared maintenance). I can't see a civic department being too keen on fruit trees and raised beds in their way - even if they can freely destroy those plantings with no responsibility to replace or financially compensate the homeowner.<br><br>
"Road allowance" use in Canada is not as unrestricted as described here. For example, if a road allowance is a natural wet zone, in some parts of Canada it becomes a "protected waterway" for water fowl habitat. Individuals are prohibited from removing vegetation, draining water, etc. This example would more frequently occur in rural settings than cities, but may apply. Just because road allowance is public land, doesn't mean an individual can use it as he/she sees fit.</div>
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Strata is Canadian version of HOA. They run gated communities/town home communities.<br><br>
Maybe it's where you are that has more restrictions? We have plenty of people around here who have gardens/trees and such well within the road allowance. Heck, we have a grove of trees that are about two feet from the road (there before we moved in likely there before the house was even built).
 

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this has been hitting the mainstream magazines lately, people are planting their parking strips into gardens all over the place. i wouldnt want to eat anything grown that close to the road (gross!), but woud consider planting native species of plants in a permaculture way that wouldnt require mowing.<br><br><a href="http://www.bhg.com/gardening/yard/garden-care/plant-your-parking-strip/" target="_blank">http://www.bhg.com/gardening/yard/ga...parking-strip/</a>
 

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There was a local article about planting sweet potatoes there <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br><a href="http://foodnotlawnskc.org/2009/12/21/sweet-potatoes-in-our-paradise-gardens/" target="_blank">http://foodnotlawnskc.org/2009/12/21...adise-gardens/</a>
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks for the ideas and advice!<br><br>
I think I will contact the city and see what the rules are for my area. I also need to see where the water and gas lines are!<br>
There is no HOA in my neighborhood, but no one has really planted their parking strips with anything. in my last neighborhood (same city) almost everyone had planted theirs: fruit trees, ornamental trees, all sorts of things.<br><br>
I am not too worried about pollution as far as fruit trees go: I live on a small dead end street with very little traffic. We don't get enough snow here to plow, so no need to worry about snow pile-up on the strip or de-icing chemicals. I don't think I'll be planting anything edible on the ground level, though. maybe some pretty ornamentals.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>katelove</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15369065"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">In Australia it's called the nature strip and some people have started planting vegie gardens in them <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
No help at all in answering your question, I just think it's a cool thing to do.</div>
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Yep <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"> It's quite common in the cities here to turn it into an extra bit of food garden or plant it out with natives.
 

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Around here it's called a planting strip, and we are encouraged to plant "street trees" in them - that is, trees that won't grow so tall as to interfere with power lines, or drop messy fruit. But folks plant all sorts of things in them.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I talked with the city and I am welcome to plant whatever I want in there on the condition that if they need to widen the road or do digging in the area then it is my loss and expense. I can handle that.
 
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