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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My DD will only be 5 this august so I was told that here in FLorida she doesnt need to be schooled or attend school until she is 6, which wont be till next fall.

We have decided to homeschool for many reason, i am not happy with the amount of time a child is expected to spend in a school all day. I am a SAHM and 8 hours seems so long of a day for such a little one also the schools here on the beach are way too expensive for us, I dont drive so I wouldnt evenbe able to get her to a school off the beach if there was even one close enough to us.

Anyhow I am looking for resources to start my DD this year at home even though it isnt required by law because i dont want her to be behind when she turns 6 because then i figure she will start on 1st grade material.

I am not even sure what a child her age is expected to know at this point.
Any advice on that and where to start as far as who i need to contact if anyone at all and what materials i will need, money is kinda tight we are a one income family so i dont have a lot of funds to spend on the materials, so only what i really need.

Also what do you do as far as socializing, we play at the playground with other children and see some here and there on the beach we havnet joined any extra curricular activities yet, my DD doesnt wish to at this time, ( i guess she is not ready for that yet) she mostly hangs with mom, sis and dad at this point.

ok thanks any info you can give i would be most grateful!
 

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You're asking lots of questions that are quite commonly asked by people who are just beginning to look into homeschooling. What you'll be finding, though, is that the kind of questions that come from having grown up in a school-going society will start to become fairly unrelated to the different lifestyle of homeschooling.

You asked:

Anyhow I am looking for resources to start my DD this year at home even though it isnt required by law because i dont want her to be behind when she turns 6 because then i figure she will start on 1st grade material.

Some of the great advantages of homeschooling are that you will no longer need to think in terms of grade levels and will not have to be concerned with the idea of being behind. You can just take one step at a time and provide whatever she needs in order to go about learning, and she'll be humming right along, taking very little time to learn things it would take a lot longer to learn in a group setting. For generations, kindergarten was a time for imaginative playing and learning how to be in a group setting in a way that would make 1st grade the next year go smoothly. If you do nothing but let her play, she can still be up to par with whatever 1st graders are doing by the time that year ends. And even if she's "behind" the highest expectations in some things and "ahead" in others, it won't make any difference in the big picture. She'll be all happily over the map in the years to come, and that's one of the wonderful advantages you're getting with homeschooling.

I am not even sure what a child her age is expected to know at this point.

It honestly depends on who's doing the expecting for the needs of a child of that age. There are lots of us who would expect only that she knows how to play and learn in her own way about whatever she wants. There are lots of others who expect that she should be able to say the ABCs and count. There are lots of others who expect that she should be reading some before she's 6. There are others who expect even more. But you have only that one child and her own unique and individual development and interests and propensities - so you have the freedom to be able to facilitate whatever feels good to you both. Here's a page in which World Book Encyclopedia lists what schools typically aim to cover by the end of each year:
Typical Course of Study. Do keep in mind that those are things they hope to cover, but don't always manage - and that their plans are based on the challenge of trying to get in a body of learning for a whole lot of different kinds of children by the time they get out of elementary years and so forth. Your own homeschool can take a very different route.

Any advice on that and where to start as far as who i need to contact if anyone at all and what materials i will need, money is kinda tight we are a one income family so i dont have a lot of funds to spend on the materials, so only what i really need.

That, of course, depends on how much you want to do in the way of any formal studies, but there's still no way a child of 5 or 6 could need anything that would require much in the way of expense. You don't need to contact anyone beyond just whatever is required in your state in the way of covering your basic legalities. Here's a recent thread that has to do with Florida - Does this exist?

And here are pages that link to information about the state homeschooling laws:
Home Education Magazine
A - Z Home's Cool.

Also what do you do as far as socializing...

Most homeschoolers connect with others through local support groups at one point or another - many stay active with them all the way through. Here's a post that has links to ways of finding support groups. And many satisfy these needs with community activities and connections with neighbors.

Oh! I just remembered these other recent threads that should be very helpful!
Considering homeschool - so many questions
More homeschooling questions (beginner)

Here's a nice list of books about homeschooling.
Here's a nice little free downloadable intro to homeschooling booklet from Home Education Magazine.
Here's a delightful catalog of learning materials - FUN-Books.

This is a great time to just kick back and enjoy, while you get oriented to the open-ended possibilities that lay ahead.
Lillian
 

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My blog is all about homeschooling in FL.
It's new so not everything is posted yet. http://www.homeschoolinflorida.com

The idea of homeschooling (when you first start thinking about it seriously) is so exciting!
:

I would also relax and have FUN now. Don't worry about what she's supposed to be learning. IMO, kids in K now are pushed waaay too hard and are not developmentally ready for what they're being forced to do in PS. Ever wonder why the ADHD rate has skyrocketed?

You can join a h'school group for fun, for support, ideas and inspiration. There are lots in FL. Where do you live?
 

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I really don't think you need to push it right now, at her age.

*But* there is a lot of fun learning stuff you can do with her now, informally, that will be a great foundation for formal schooling if you go that route.

Start with your library. Alphabet books, number books, counting books, anything she's interested in. And learning videos, and learning songs on cd, and books on tape/cd. Learning dvd's my kids have loved and learned a lot from are programs like Sesame Street (of course!) Bill Nye the Science Guy, Read-a-lee-deed-a-lee, even baby einstein once in a while. Also pretty much anything with "Schlessinger Media" on the label.


Lots of drug stores carry coloring and workbooks up to about 3rd grade level. My kids always had fun with those.

And often Dollar Tree or Dollar General and Big Lots stores have neat learning tools/toys as well, you just have to keep your eyes peeled. Puzzles, maps, workbooks, board books... This morning I found a little magnetic puzzle which is exactly what I've been looking for to help ds remember the continents, and it also has all the countries and their capitals (though you need a magnifying glass to read them!).

Socializing--our kids really were with me 99.9% of the time until the last year or so. When our oldest was 4.5, he started going to Sunday School for the first time, and that same year he went to VBS for a week, first time where I wasn't in the building while he was there.
Even though our kids regularly "socialize" twice a week at most (sunday school and gym class), they do *just fine* with their peers and with everyone else. "Socialization" is overrated, IMO, at least in the way it's meant when trying to make people feel bad about homeschooling.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by mamamoogs View Post
We have decided to homeschool for many reason,
: for you & your dd!

Quote:
Anyhow I am looking for resources to start my DD this year at home even though it isnt required by law because i dont want her to be behind when she turns 6 because then i figure she will start on 1st grade material.
With the state of so many schools these days, even if you did very little I doubt she would be behind


Quote:
I am not even sure what a child her age is expected to know at this point.
Any advice on that and where to start as far as who i need to contact if anyone at all and what materials i will need, money is kinda tight we are a one income family so i dont have a lot of funds to spend on the materials, so only what i really need.
The library! Think outside the box and don't use text books.. use whatever books strike your collective fancy


Quote:
Also what do you do as far as socializing, we play at the playground with other children and see some here and there on the beach we havnet joined any extra curricular activities yet, my DD doesnt wish to at this time, ( i guess she is not ready for that yet) she mostly hangs with mom, sis and dad at this point.
If she doesn't seem ready yet, then I suggest just doing what you're doing! We play at the park with other kids regularly and we are part of a homeschool group that does organized activites, although we have only participated sporadically. My kids spend a fair bit of time with their grandparents and cousins as well. But they don't seem to suffer ... we had an art gallery activity yesterday with a childrens author and before hand all the kids, ran around playing & found a stick insect to watch


Now granted my 7 &5yo's have issues with attention span so they had a lot of trouble sitting through the reading of the book and such, but the actual hands on activity they were all over. That's just their limited attention span though and not socialization!
 

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Hi! We're just going to be starting in the fall, too, so I'm not a seasoned expert. However, I can tell you what I've been looking at to help me know what she "should" know in Kindergarten and also what inexpensive curricula I've been looking at.

Someone here (I'm sorry I can't give credit, because I don't remember who it was - maybe elizawill?) gave me a link to the Baltimore Curriculum Project, which has tons of free lesson plans for most subjects. They are available here: http://www.baltimorecp.org/lessons/draft_lessons.html They're based on the Core Knowledge Foundation's schedule of what the public schools should be teaching when. (It's all based on an idea in the book by E.D. Hirsch, called The Schools We Need & Why We Don't Have Them.) You can look up the Core Knowledge Foundation to find out what they're all about.

DD is VERY into science, so I ordered this book http://www.amazon.com/Building-Found...9156938&sr=1-2 It's supposed to be a science curriculum for K-2. It was written by a college science professor and it's only $22.45. Unfortunately, it's not due to get here until tomorrow, so I can't tell you if it's any good.

I looked at a program called Making Math Meaningful, which is very inexpensive. You can find it here: http://www.cornerstonecurriculum.com...um/MMM/MMM.htm A friend of mine who used it recommended starting with the Level 1, since K is really, really basic, apparently. On the website it says you can start with either one. I decided to go with Professor B math instead, which costs a little more to start (I'm getting the CD) but is actually less expensive over time, as one CD and workbook are 3 grades' worth of material. It's here: http://www.profb.com/ Another very inexpensive math program is called Math Mammoth. It starts at a first grade level, according to the information on the website, so I don't know if that would be good for you or not. It's here: http://www.mathmammoth.com/

The book What Your Kindergartener Needs to Know is put out by the Core Knowledge people. It's only about $15.00 and it goes into art, science, history, math, geography and other things I'm forgetting. It's definitely not a curriculum, but if you're wanting to make sure you "keep up" with other kids, this book will let you know what you should cover. DD really likes me to read to her from it and it has ideas for applying math in a concrete way to help them really understand it better. Both of the libraries near my house have several of the What Your Nth Grader Needs to Know books (there's a whole series of them), so you could try your local libraries first.

Another thing I'm looking at that's inexpensive is Five in a Row. There are four manuals that are about $30 each. You don't have to buy them all or anything.
Each manual has a book list and you read a book, then follow the lesson plans for it. I have a thread going that I just started about FIAR, if you look for it. It doesn't seem very in depth to me, but a lot of people like it and think it is (I've only looked at the online lesson samples, so I don't really know). I'm probably going to get one manual just to try it out. I'll probably get the books from the library or something.

Hooked on Phonics is a really inexpensive reading program. Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons is an inexpensive book that works well for a lot of people. We're using Spell to Write and Read, which was about $100, including StWR, The Wise Guide for Spelling, the spelling rules cards and the phonogram cards. It's a spelling and reading program that should get you through several grades on those topics. I like that it teaches all the spelling rules, which a lot of programs don't do. I think the A Beka reading curriculum is inexpensive, as well. We aren't Christian and A Beka is overtly religious, so we aren't using it, but it's what I learned to read with back in private school and I still have fond memories of it.


If you see anything you'd like to read more about, www.homeschoolreviews.com has tons of reviews on all kinds of programs. I've found it very helpful.

Like I said, I'm no expert, but I am in your situation and I've sifted through TONS of stuff over the last month or so. I figured I could share some of it with you and at least give a few different ideas. I know a lot of people are all about not worrying about any sort of curriculum or formal learning in K and that's cool. It's just not what we are wanting to do with our family.
I liked the structured learning I got (at age four!) in private school kindergarten, and judging by the fact that I was officially more than a grade ahead when I switched to PS, I don't think it hurt me any. I still like learning. I've spent most of my adult life taking classes for something or other, often just for fun. If you don't want to do anything structured, I think that's fine, but if you do, there are lots of cool (and inexpensive!) options out there. If you do it with your DD's needs in mind, I'm sure it will be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi mama
Thanks for all the great advice, For the mama who asked were we are located, we are in pinellas county on the beach.

I am leaning towards doing nothing right now it seems that when i say ok lets do numbers and letters my DD goes into a hissy, so I am wondering if she just isnt ready yet, i have done workbooks and sorts, but all she does is color them and draw on them, we have a program my mom bought us called school is cool it is for the computer and she really seems to like this, it teach how to write letters and numbers and has picture drawing and teaches a little about the ocean and lakes fish etc.

It seems when my DD teaches herself she is great but as soon as i sit with her and try to get involved she gets mad and stops wanting to learn, so i am thinking i will sit back and she what she can accomplish on her own for a bit.

As far as socializing is very friendly with others, we dont have any family here, so getting to play with cousins and grandparents isnt an options, but we go out alot she does have a 2 year old sis and all day is play and when she finally has the chance to play with another child she isnt shy and goes right to it.

I am getting quite the attitude from my mom about her not being enrolled in school for this coming fall.

It would seem in her eyes I am the weird one ( we are a cloth diapering, non vaxing, extended breastfeeding and co-sleeping family) so my moms exact words to me lastnight were that "I WAS GETTING WEIRDER AND WEIRDER" if that is even a word LOL.

I am going to check out the sources that you have given me and I would love to keep hearing other mamas out there respond how they got started.
thanks!
 

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another Florida Momma here! My DD will be 5 next month, but I have considered us "homeschooling" from the get go. We are real casual right now, I have K and 1st grade materials in most subject around, we do some things here and there. I read her a chapter from a longer book each night and that has really exploded her reading (because she can't make up the story from the pictures) We do all sorts of little science experiments, have zoo and science center passes that we use the heck out of, do playdates with friends and other playgroups. Mostly I just give her all the unstructured time she wants. She is like a little mad scientist in her room- making playdoh manta rays like the ones we saw the day before, drawing blimps because we saw the Goodyear one and then looked up how they work in one of her encyclopedias. I have decided to slowly add structure in as we need it, but since she is ahead a grade level in most things now with just our normal nerdy goofing off I am not sweating it so much.

Florida is an easy state to homeschool in- all you need is a teacher to sign off each year or you can go the umbrella school route, and there are a couple unschooling ones. (of course you can teach any style you want, but you won't have to worry about the FCAT or anything)

All my best homeschooling gets done on the beach anyhow- so much to talk about science wise and I get a tan.
 

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Aahh, well if she likes computer stuff, there are all kinds of computer things she might be interested in. Click N Read phonics is only $60.00 for a lifetime membership. It only has 100 lessons, but it's supposed to be really good. My DD likes the demo, so I'm thinking of getting it. Then there's Time4Learning, which is also online. I think it's about $20/month and you can try it for free for two weeks. A lot of people really like Jumpstart, which is a virtual world for kids that's got a lot of educational stuff in it. Some people like Reading Eggs and some like Starfall.

Links are:

http://www.clicknkids.com/
http://www.starfall.com/
http://www.jumpstart.com/
http://readingeggs.com/
http://www.time4learning.com/
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Plummeting View Post
DD is VERY into science, so I ordered this book http://www.amazon.com/Building-Found...9156938&sr=1-2 It's supposed to be a science curriculum for K-2. It was written by a college science professor and it's only $22.45. Unfortunately, it's not due to get here until tomorrow, so I can't tell you if it's any good.
Oh, after you've had a few days with the book - can you let me know how you like it? I try to get books from the library first, before we consider buying them, but our 4 county wide library systems doesn't have it!
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by mamamoogs View Post
It seems when my DD teaches herself she is great but as soon as i sit with her and try to get involved she gets mad and stops wanting to learn, so i am thinking i will sit back and she what she can accomplish on her own for a bit.
I see that she's only 4 - which is awfully young to be concerned about letters or numbers. It will just take more time to try to get her to learn those now than it would if you just wait a year or two when it would take no time at all - and by the time there's anything she'd need to be reading, it won't matter in the least how old she was when she first started learning to read.


Here are some other threads that have to do with reading:
Talk to me about delayed reading instruction

Reading with an almost 6yr old...

Article: Education key to economic survival
"Finland has often been hailed as having one of the most successful education systems. But what drives its high level of achievement? And what makes it different?"

Lillian
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by KJoslyn78 View Post
Oh, after you've had a few days with the book - can you let me know how you like it? I try to get books from the library first, before we consider buying them, but our 4 county wide library systems doesn't have it!

I will do that. I got it today and I've been looking through it, but not enough to have any real idea yet. I'm making myself read from the beginning, because when I skipped right back to the lessons, it was hard to tell anything.
 
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