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<p>I've always wished that I could homeschool my son, but it's never been a real option, at least not the way I'd want to do it.  I'm a solo mom so I need to work, and I work in a school setting which makes bringing him to work without enrolling him impossible.</p>
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<p>He does OK in school, teachers love him, decent grades, but he doesn't love it.  I've begun to think about the possibility of homeschooling for high school.  By then, my career will probably be at the point where I could work partially from home, and I could imagine him being involved in things that have a major time committment outside the home, that aren't school -- a job, volunteer opportunities, sports teams, maybe community college courses, etc . . .   I think we could make it work.  I mentioned this to him the other day and he thought it was a great idea.</p>
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<p>High school is probably the earliest I'd be comfortable with home schooling without an adult home much of the time, and he's only in 6th grade, so I've got some time to research, but I thought I'd ask what other people are doing for high school, and what I should be researching so I can be prepared. </p>
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<p>1) If you have high schoolers or are thinking ahead to high school, I'd love to know what you're doing.</p>
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<p>2)  Are there good online options for high school classes, particularly where you can pick and choose single subjects? He's doing an online math class right now and enjoying it and progressing well.  I can see online classes, as a great option for him, and his learning style.  However, I'm not sure what exists at the high school level.  I looked at K12 and almost passed out from boredom while reviewing the sample lessons -- definitely not the kind of rigorous, higher level thinking I want for him. </p>
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<p>3) How easy is it to move in and out of public school at this age.  If we do it for a semester and he doesn't like it can he go back?  How does it all work?</p>
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<p>Thanks!</p>
 

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<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Momily</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1282539/homeschooling-for-high-school#post_16081906"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>1) If you have high schoolers or are thinking ahead to high school, I'd love to know what you're doing.</p>
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<p><span style="color:rgb(0,0,205);">I have one high schooler - grade 9.  He is doing 2 cyber classes online, and a drama class through a Youth theatre company.  Some kids do more than 2 classes  - but honestly, 2 is plenty!   I find cyber school more work for me (ironically) than when he was more straight HS/USed - as I find he needs some help with staying on time, etc.  Cyber school has been his choice and overall it has been a great experience. </span></p>
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<p><span style="color:rgb(0,0,205);">I expect in upcoming years he will both have a job and do dual enrolment courses through a local university.</span></p>
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<p>2)  Are there good online options for high school classes, particularly where you can pick and choose single subjects? He's doing an online math class right now and enjoying it and progressing well.  I can see online classes, as a great option for him, and his learning style.  However, I'm not sure what exists at the high school level.  I looked at K12 and almost passed out from boredom while reviewing the sample lessons -- definitely not the kind of rigorous, higher level thinking I want for him. </p>
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<p><span style="color:rgb(0,0,205);">My sons classes online are fairly good.  He takes classes through a provincial cyber school.  I find the math rigorous, and the media arts and geography not so rigourous...but many of them are what you make of them.  Some of the assignments are fairly open ended - so you can deeply and intensely focus or not.</span></p>
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<p><span style="color:rgb(0,0,205);">I think there is a wide range of classes online, but you may have to do some sleuthing to find them.</span></p>
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<p>3) How easy is it to move in and out of public school at this age.  If we do it for a semester and he doesn't like it can he go back?  How does it all work?</p>
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<p><span style="color:rgb(0,0,205);">This is a tricky one for me to answer.</span></p>
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<p><span style="color:rgb(0,0,205);">I think the bottom line is they can always go to school.</span></p>
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<p><span style="color:rgb(0,0,205);">For my son it would be tricky.  He is in grade 9, but is taking a grade 9 and a grade 10 class.  He plays mix and match according to his interests and academic concerns.  If he went to high school, I think his scheduel may be a mess.  The local high school is also on a semester system - none of his friends have had math yet (they are taking it in the winter/spring semester)....what would they do with him if he returned to school and all the grade 9's have math in the second semester - but he already has it?  Honestly, this is not a big concern for us, and I think there is something to be said for taking courses that interest you now rather than worrying about what will happen if you go to school.  ,If it is a concern for you  I would try to replicate the school scheduel for the first term  so as not to mess up the scheduel.  </span></p>
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<p><span style="color:rgb(0,0,205);">YMMV - some people have had a smooth experiences integrating high schoolers into high school, and some don't.  Know your local school.</span></p>
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<p>Thanks!</p>
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Kathy</p>
 

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<p>We're in BC, Canada, so I'm not sure that any of the particularities here would apply to you, but we are homeschooling at the high school level. I have a dd in 11th grade and a ds in 9th, at least according to age. My dd actually attends school in person part-time now and has decided to pursue the public school diploma. My ds is not really committed one way or the other on the diploma issue and is hedging his bets for now. Both were very much unschooled but around 9th grade age began enjoying the challenge of some subject-oriented course work. </p>
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<p>We have found courses in maths and sciences that have worked well for them through the school system here: similar in format I would guess to K12, but focused on challenging content with little busy work. The humanities courses we've been less than thrilled with. My dd is toughing those out because she wants the diploma. So far my ds is avoiding them.</p>
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<p>We've also been able to work with this particular school to get them credit for unschooled "courses." This is similar to what Clonlara does. My kids identify an area of interest, design their own "course of study" and document the work they do. The school grants credits. So far they've got credits for Instrumental Music, Choral Music, InfoTech & Multi-Media studies and Creative Writing. </p>
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<p>They do pretty much all their work independently. They have each other and younger siblings, so if I'm not around they still have company and feel like life at home is interesting and varied. </p>
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<p>Using this credit-like structure through the local school, it would be totally easy for my kids to transition from homeschooling to school. Our school was totally cool with my dd taking English 12 (senior English) in 10th grade, and my 12-year-old may be taking 9th grade math next semester. They're really easy-going about asynchronous learning and flexibility.</p>
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<p>Your mileage may vary, of course, since you're dealing with a different school system in a different country.</p>
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<p>Miranda</p>
 

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<p>My daughter is 17, and she's unschooled. She did start taking college classes at 14 and is currently taking 9 credits at a community college, plus studying World History on her own and sitting in on a Russian class at a local university.</p>
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<p>There are a ton of online classes for homeschooled high schoolers out there. Some are privately run marketed exclusively to homeschoolers (Potter's School and Pennsylvania Homeschoolers come to mind), some are affiliated with public K-12 schools or charters, and some are run by community colleges or state universities (University of Missouri has a bunch). Oh, and then there are lots of free open source classes college classes online, too, from a variety of universities... and there's stuff like ALEKS for math... really, there's a lot, if that's how your son likes to learn.</p>
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<p>Moving in and out of public school would be tough. Unless you are homeschooling through a state-accredited public school program (charter or ISP), the school may not accept any of the credits your son earns while homeschooling. It might be better to start in 8th grade, and then if it doesn't work out your son could go back to school for 9th and not be behind as far as high school credits.</p>
 
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