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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone who's homeschooling ever have their child officially tested or something like that? I've been doing some research and I am wondering if our eldest would qualify as gifted. She's not in preschool b/c we're homeschooling and plan to continue that as long as possible. I was basically curious if those who are homeschooling identified their kids as gifted themselves and left it at that or if they chose to do some sort of third party testing/evaluation.
 

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We did have our dd tested last fall right after she turned 8. It was difficult to decide whether to pursue testing or not. I am glad we did for a few reasons. It gave us a bit better insight on her relative strengths and weaknesses helping me decide how best to help her. It validated my belief that the fast pace she was asking for was not incorrect. The scores qualified her for the Davidson Young Scholars program where I can look for support as needed. If there are programs she is interested in participating in later that require scores we now have them.<br><br>
I don't think it is something everyone needs to do, or that even we necessarily had to do. I just felt better knowing we had the scores if we needed them so that later on we wouldn't be wishing we'd gotten them. A big factor for us was finding a tester within a days drive who was experienced with highly gifted kids and didn't cost an arm and a leg. We got IQ and achievement testing for $300. I'm not sure we could have justified spending thousands as some people have found necessary.<br><br>
Before testing, I had no problem identifying our dd as gifted if the situation required it -but there is rarely a need.
 

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To the OP: I am wondering what would be your reason for testing. I did have my son tested when he was 5 and just entering public kindergarten. He is one of those gifted children for whom life seems to much to handle: he is anxious, he is sensitive, he is always thinking and does not know how to just "let it go." He has a very low frustration level, as well. In short, he was unhappy and seemed to be struggling with life. He was in therapy for anxiety at the time, and his therapist suggested testing to help illuminate for us any subtle or hidden issues that could be affecting his behavior and anxiety. Our testing cost more than $2,000 and did little to inform us. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> Nonetheless, at the time I chose to go through with it, I felt I was helping my son by trying to figure out a missing piece of the puzzle. It didn't help, and I'm over it. I wouldn't recommend testing just for the sake of satisfying curiosity because it may yield inaccurate results. However, if by knowing a particular score or number, you feel you can better educate your daughter at home, then you shouldd consider it. I ddon't know a lot about home schooling, but I am a public schol teacher (fourth grade) and in general, I feel I have a strong intuition for teaching children. Knowing their scores has not been particularly helpful to me, except on the rare occasion, such as with a child with a learning disability who has a hard time conveying her true knowledge and abilities but may be gifted.
 

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Our child has disabilities and his IQ and acheivment were first tested as part of a broader developmental evaluation. It turned out to be helpful to us in two ways. One, it opened up opportunities for him to participate in some gifted programs of interest. Two, it helped convince us it was okay to really open to more radical acceleration than we probably wouldn't have otherwise considered. It gave us some idea where he was already and helped us avoid the trap of thinking we needed to slow things down.<br><br>
I don't think there is any universal reason why assessment is necessary for homeschoolers, nor any reason why homeschoolers should avoid it either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm mostly interested in whether or not home educators found this information useful in planning their curriculums. Would testing give me a better picture of her strengths and weaknesses and allow me to foster growth in those areas appropriately? This is more what I'm wondering vs. needing scores for some outside reason.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>1stTimeMummytoLore</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7274285"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I'm mostly interested in whether or not home educators found this information useful in planning their curriculums. Would testing give me a better picture of her strengths and weaknesses and allow me to foster growth in those areas appropriately? This is more what I'm wondering vs. needing scores for some outside reason.</div>
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It did for us...but that was more a range of giftedness question than anything. If the kid was moderately gifted and I wasn't worried about learning disabilities, I don't think it would have been much help.
 
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