Mothering Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
226 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
<p>I can't believe I even have to post this.  Really.  In my perfect world my dd would just eat what I eat, but alas that is not the case at all.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I eat a GAPS, starch free, traditional diet that includes meat, veggies, fruits, nuts and fats.</p>
<p>My husband eats the standard american diet (SAD)</p>
<p> </p>
<p>My dd is a very picky eater and always has been, but I have always found ways to get the nutrition in... I worry about protein since she rejects meat sometimes, but in those instances I just push more milk or nuts and do my best.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Anyway, things are getting worse.  She seems to be getting even more picky and with her age 6 going on 14 I can't win one single battle... I mean really.  Tonight she rejected pasta with butter?</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I know that her pallet is corrupt, I mean how can homemade chicken broth compare to campbells double noodle with additives?  And how can dates and figs compare to chocolate ice cream?</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I buy fresh, wholesome food and spend a lot of time preparing it.  My dh buys everything boxed and canned and plenty of sweets.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I am just out of ideas and worried about my girl.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
661 Posts
<p>You need to get DH on board, it is a lot to expect for her to eat different than Daddy. How does he feel about this issue? Does it bother him that she is eating these things?</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,036 Posts
<p>This is me, too.  My oldest is SUCH a picky eater.  He eats nutritionally-absent crap, but won't touch my homemade, healthy stuff.  Looking forward to some ideas on here!<br>
 </p>
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Ravenlunatic</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1282497/how-can-i-get-my-6-yr-old-to-eat-better#post_16081512"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p> </p>
<p>My dd is a very picky eater and always has been, but I have always found ways to get the nutrition in... I worry about protein since she rejects meat sometimes, but in those instances I just push more milk or nuts and do my best.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Anyway, things are getting worse.  She seems to be getting even more picky and with her age 6 going on 14 I can't win one single battle... I mean really.  Tonight she rejected pasta with butter?</p>
<p> </p>
</div>
</div>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
799 Posts
<p>I could post this exactly. My DH works overseas though but the eating of the SAD has stuck. Now my DH does prepare nice healthy food but also eats alot of boxed/processed stuff. In fact my DS who is 6 refuses to eat the multigrain bread that I bought (I know) and asked for white Wonder bread today. Sigh. Looking for ideas.</p>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,231 Posts
<p>DH is a picky eater who erred towards the boxed, processed foods for a long time.  He's gradually come 'round although his palate hasn't changed much (he still doesn't like many veggies, fruits). </p>
<p> </p>
<p>I started by swapping half the pasta for meals with whole wheat pasta.  It took a couple years for him to catch me at it and after awhile he agreed that the whole wheat pasta tastes better and a few more years, 'til he said, "Why don't we just have the whole wheat pasta when we have pasta, it's better for us anyway." </p>
<p> </p>
<p>In terms of picky kids -- I highly recommend finding a copy of Ellyn Satter's book <em>Child of Mine</em>.  She's a nutritionist whose specialties are childhood nutrition, and eating disorders.  Her books are really good and address many of the picky eater issues in a practical way. </p>
<p> </p>
<p>My eldest is not a picky eater and never has been.  Dd2 takes after her daddy more - she's been picky.  Compounded by the fact that both girls had childhood allergies (dd1's egg allergy persists, dd2 outgrew her dairy/soy allergies around 3 years of age).  <em>Child of Mine</em> has been helpful in overcoming some of those hurdles.  It's a long process but she's just recently started to initiate, on her own, eating a larger variety of vegetables.  (happydance! Man I miss the good smilies)....</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Read the book all the way through.  There were points where I was reading it and thinking, "You have GOT to be kidding!"  but keep reading.  And then come back and discuss.  There are several of us who post here who've read her book(s) and found them helpful. </p>
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top