Mothering Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,040 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to become a midwife, I am living in the state of FL and will be starting midwifery school in September (thats what you have to do here to become an LM) I want to be a birth center/homebirth midwife and would love to be an apprentice or labor assistant to a midwife to gain experience. I am already a doula just needing to attend one more birth to become "certified".

My question is: how do I approach a midwife to talk about becoming an apprentice? Do I just open up the yellow pages and start calling birth centers? I know some of the midwives on here have apprentices, how did they find you? I'm just wondering where to start....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
903 Posts
I am getting ready to do the same thing and would like to hear what others did to find their apprenticeship. Please pass along the knowledge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,492 Posts
Sorry, that was rude of me.


When I was looking for a preceptor, I got a list of midwives in the area and asked for an interview. I interviewed 6 and eventually ended up working with 4. After a year, I settled with the one I felt had the most to offer me, and who could help me develop my empirical skills. I still took call for the other 3 when they needed me.
Midwives appreciate someone with intitiative and who shows interest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
903 Posts
Thank you for the insight. That sounds like a great way to go about it. My problem is that the nearest midwife in my area is an hour away and there are only 2 that I know of. I am thinking I might need to drive 2-3 hours to apprentice and this seems like an unreasonable distance, right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,492 Posts
It is far to drive. But, if you're options are limited......what else are you going to do?
I drove 45 minutes to an hour to my clinical site. Some births I drove 3 hours to get to! (Nerve racking if she's going fast!) It's good training for when you have you're own practice, though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
903 Posts
This is good to know. I live in a rural area and I plan on serving all the communities within this area, so I know I will be driving for my own practice eventually, but it makes me feel more confident knowing that it is not unreasonable to drive 3 hours to be with a mom.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,368 Posts
There are some legal issues with apprenticeship in FL right now. I want to say they made it illegal? Hmmm...my friend who would know that isn't available right now, but I know she mentioned something about it to me...Okay..just got ahold of her and she says that it's not illegal, but you have to carry fully liability insurance on yourself if you are an apprentice in FL. Maybe that's do-able? I dunno...

As far as getting an apprenticeship, I just called midwives and asked what their policies were as far as apprenticeship. If they charged their apprentices or were too far away, or whatever, I eliminated them. I ended up meeting with two midwives, and I just clicked with one more than the other. She invited me to a clinical day right away and I observed and it just felt right. The other midwife was much more guarded and didn't really say one way or the other whether she was looking for an apprentice, but kept saying "we can get together and talk about it." It's been an interesting ride, but I'm almost done now and would probably still make the same choice if I had it to do again.

As far as distance, I drive 97 miles (1.5 hours) to do my clinicals, and have driven as far as 2 hours for births. My preceptor is pretty reasonable and for the births that were 1.5 hours in the opposite direction from me and 8th time babies, she just didn't call me. Frustrating, but it saved me lots of driving. Even when she did call me, I still missed the births about 1/2 the time. I've been apprenticing for 18 months and have 36 births, though there have been 2x that many births in the practice during the time I've been apprenticing. I'm going to Davao City (www.midwifeschool.org) in 10 days to work there for a month and get the rest of my numbers in. I feel like I'm pretty confident in my prenatal and postpartum care, but I really want some more births under my belt before I take NARM. I'll let you know how this arrangement worked out when I get back. Right now I'm cautiously hopeful that I'll be a licensed midwife by October or November.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,492 Posts
The school is supposed to cover your liabilty, at least mine did when I was a student. It was covered in the tuition. Find out if your school covers you, Bionic.

I would love to go to the Phillipines!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,040 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I know that in the state of FL you have to be licensed to practice midwifery and you are not allowed to get your only education through apprenticeship, you must attend some sort of accredited formal education. But my midwifery school did say that they would set me up with an apprenticeship my second year. But that is a long time away, and I'd like to start now. Calling midwives and asking what their apprenticeship policies are is a good idea. That is where I'll start.

For the mama who asked for the link to my school, here it is: http://www.mannaschoolofmidwifery.org/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,492 Posts
yes you can talk to them ahead of time but one thing I have found is that many women start out wanting to be midwives and few stay on that path- so interview the midwives in your area and find a few who you think you would like to work with- then after you have done some study- say in 6 months talk to them again. some midwives are very organized as far as teaching students go and can easily fit someone in others have to figure out as it goes how to fit each apprentice in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,368 Posts
MWHerbs makes a good point. I've already decided that I have an 18 month "waiting list" for apprentices. Even if there's no one on the list, someone who contacts me is going to have to wait 18 months. If she really wants it badly enough, she will work toward having her family ready for her apprenticeship and get some education in during that time. My preceptor gives homework when she first talks to someone she is considering taking (and she talks to many that she would never consider taking). You have to write a paper on the history of midwifery in the USA, apply for the Associaton of Texas Midwives Training program, and take some time to think about it. The way she puts it is that she is giving you everything she knows about midwifery and entrusting her clients to you, so she has to know that you are not going to flake out halfway through and not show up at a birth or whatever.

This is not to say that you would do this, but that many so-called apprentices have done this. So expect that midwives you talk to will be wary, and don't be frustrated if you find that you have to prove yourself worthy of the time and effort involved in passing down their knowledge. IMO, a good midwife is very careful about who she chooses to train, because for the rest of that person's career as a midwife, she will be reflecting her teaching, and you want to make sure that you are training someone who will reflect well on you most of the time.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top