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I'm currently 28 weeks into my third pregnancy (currently OB care and very low risk). Both my previous were uncomplicated easy hospital inductions that I'm blessed and grateful for but somehow felt unsatisfied by. I dreamt that this birth would be completely UC, which was kind of odd since I never really considered or knew about UC as an option before this dream. But now I'm fascinated by the idea and somewhat obsessed about reading more about UC. Unfortunately, the more I read, the more nervous about it I get. Initially, it came to me as such a wonderfully simple dream, after reading more, I'm starting to get concerned about complications, supplies, herbals, legalities, etc.<br><br>
It's not that I don't want to be prepared, but I'm confused about the amount of education I need to UC. Do I need to read emergency childbirth, spinningbabies, all the posts on this board, etc (there's so much interesting info out there) to know what to do during transition or will instinct take over? Is it possible to have a short pain free labor without birthing classes? If the baby's breech will my body take over or do I need to know a specific manuover? Do I need to drink a special tea to prevent hemmorhage or will it be ok? I'm getting overwhelmed and concerned that a sucessful (healthy mom and baby) UC is only possible with alot of preparation.<br><br>
So tell me, in your experience, can one truly relax and rely on intuition or is that naive and potentially setting me up for disaster? In your expertise is there one thing that women should do/know/have before UCing?
 

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There are not special maneuvers for breech. Hands-off is usually considered the best approach. Breech babies are born breech, unless they turn spontaneously prior to engaging in the pelvis.<br><br>
Shoulder dystocia, a rare complication, does have some maneuvers that you might want to learn about. There's <a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?t=861700" target="_blank">another current thread</a> where I posted the specifics of those.<br><br>
You might be fine through transition, or you might scream your head off and beg to go get drugs, even if you are in little pain, due to the hormones of transition. You might want to prepare anyone who will be with you for the birth to respond appropriately to either situation. Having a level-headed, calm partner (or whoever) with you to determine whether there is an emergency to respond to (such as if you really feel there's a problem, or there's excessive bleeding, etc.) or whether you just need support, can be very helpful.<br><br>
Some have said that "just-in-case" plans, like having a midwife they can call or a birthing center as a back-up, helped them avoid the hospital, while others said it set them up for unnecessary attendance, intervention, or transport. Reading stories involving both of these outcomes may help you determine which path is right for you.<br><br>
Many of us have tinctures of herbs on hand in case of hemorrhage, while others plan to just go to the ER if necessary.<br><br>
We have been birthing babies with generally very good success with no preparation at all for many thousands of years. There is value in being prepared for possible rare complications, and there is also value in relaxing and remembering that complications are in fact rare.
 

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let me be completely honest. all of my reading on the topic was done long before, but most of it had nothing to do with the "practicalities" of birth.<br><br>
i would read interesting articles about the hormonal process of birth, or i would read chapters in books about the biology, or i would read links posted about how to deal with certain things.<br><br>
but what i really focused on was feelings. after reading Laura Shanley's book, Unassisted Childbirth, i started to realize that i didn't need all of that knowledge/information.<br><br>
what i needed was:<br><br>
1. accepting and integrating the underlying philosophical principle of UC which, in my mind, is that birth is safe, normal, and healthy for mothers and babies and that an unhindered, intuitive, natural birth process is safest for both mothers and babies;<br><br>
2. working through all of my cultural and personal assumptions that are the antithesis of these underlying ideas;<br><br>
3. connecting to my spirit and utilizing that as my guide in the process of moving from acculturated perspective to UC perspective;<br><br>
4. developing my skills in law of attraction--thinking creating reality; positive visualization--as well as my intuitive process to understand the various macrocosmic (diety/God/Spirit), cosmic (energetic and physical manifestations), and microcosmic (internal/soul/spirit) information that i am getting in regards to my fertility, pregnancy, and future birth and how that directs what i need to do to prepare, to learn, or to utilize health care if necessary;<br><br>
5. act on this perspective, information, and process in the way that is appropriate in the moment.<br><br>
So, in preparation for this pregnancy and birth, i listen to my body intently, i listen to my spirit intently, and i listen to my spirit-environment and diety-concept intently. i recieve dreams, feelings, insights, and emotions that help guide my process.<br><br>
for this birth, i feel strongly that it will be a painless, simple birth for which i need no special supplies and have no legal worries.<br><br>
and that's that. for me, simplicity is safety.
 

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I've just started exploring, and falling in love with, the ideals of Unassisted Childbirth, as well as the ideals of Unassisted Pregnancy.<br><br>
I do think it's a good idea to gain some practical knowledge -- but I agree with zoebird that the feeling part is way more important. I think I'm somewhere between 7 and 12 weeks along, so I feel like I've got ample time to browse and absorb whatever I'm going to need. I think my spirit knows more about what I'll need than my mind does.
 

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Yes, in my case, it is a matter of trusting in birth and a belief that the instincts and love of an unhindered laboring woman are better at birthing babies than a whole team of doctors and a a whole hospital full of machines even if there are complications and even if ultimately a transfer needs to happen. I trust that I will be able to handle anything that comes up better than the doctors/midwives would. You have to trust somebody, right, and from what I feel and have read it is safest and best to trust the birthing mother.<br><br>
That is my starting point and where I always come back to when I wonder whether I have learned enough about birthing. If the Center for Unhindered Living is back up, you can use their online childbirth class to get a full feeling of preparedness and comprehensive knowledge. Also, you will probably read here, and learn things, and eventually you'll start to get the big picture. Finally, I really want to recommend that you read as many birth stories as you can and that you fully explore Laura Shanley's site. The birth stories will inspire you the way your dream did, and as you face these fears through reading about what really happens, they will probably start to seem smaller.<br><br>
Great question. Good luck!!
 

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What zoebird said! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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With our second baby I decided on UC at 31 weeks after being severely turned off to the team of mw's I was seeing. I researched and prayed a lot and finally told my husband somewhere around 35 weeks. For us that time, our only supplies were God, each other, and a brand new shoelace to tie the cord (well ok and scissors and towels to catch the mess). We didn't have any herbs or anything on hand, and with two births under my belt I've never had any bleeding problems. I did tell him in transition that I wanted to go get an epi (had one with our son under duress), but he knew I really didn't and prayed for me outloud and silently. I had a really fast labor with dd (4 1/2 hours from the first contraction to delivery) compared to ds (15 hours from when my water broke to when he was born-labor stimulated by cervical gel), and I think a LOT of it was being comfortable with where I was and not having someone who wasn't looking out for our best interests in control. The next time we have a baby I do plan on having some herbal remedies for possible hemorrage (especially since we're praying for twins), and I'm reading up more on breech...I guess I'm just interested in and I want to be prepared just in case. We also decided that next time I'm going to have a cheat sheet for dh with general info, and then another sheet with emergency related info. And someone suggested putting about 2c of corn syrup with red food coloring on towels/chux as a demonstration of how much blood can be expected so you can kind of tell when/if there is too much during the real deal, dh really liked that idea, so we're definitely doing that. Thats probably about all we're adding though. We were SUPER satisfied last time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you all for your thoughts. I especially liked thismommy's story. And there's so much to internalize with Zoebird's response.<br><br>
After my dream, the first info I discovered was Laura Shanley's website. And I was so inspired. To know I wasn't alone and there are a number of women who have birthed at home, alone, listening to their bodies was amazing. It was only after reading more about midwifery, complications, options in handling the placenta etc that I started second guessing my intuition. But you have all encouraged me again.<br><br>
I think I'll minimize the technical reading and just enjoy some UC stories. We're about 30mins to the hospital, and both my previous labors were relatively short (6h and 4hs). I really feel that this one isn't going to make it to the hospital (even if I wanted it to). I'm getting very comfortable with the idea of UCing, so much so that I'm starting to just consider the hospital as the back up if my body tells me there's something wrong.<br><br>
Again, Thank you all.
 
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