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DD is ahead in most areas in school. Her teacher thinks that she would qualify as gifted, but is concerned about labeling her as such right now. He has put into motion the steps for gifted testing, but that, apparently, takes months. He made a big deal out of not giving her too much extra stuff, how he doesn't want to "burn her out" at such a young age (6). I don't think she's anywhere near burned out and is really very bored in class. So how do you find the line between bored and overwhelmed?<br><br>
DD is adamant about staying in school, though I tried to convince her to do a more achievement-based distance learning or HS type schooling, so I need to find a way to make this work within the confines of public school.<br><br>
We have a meeting with the "student intervention team" in a couple of weeks, and I'd like to be as informed as possible when meeting with them. TIA for your thoughts and resource links!
 

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Ultimately it's your decision. You could look at acceleration ... she's not in school to be bored, but I don't like the idea of giving her extra work; that seems like a punishment. So I favor acceleration over "enrichment."<br><br>
As far as her objection to leaving school ... where I live there are several options for children to attend classes part time and be homeschooled the rest of the time. For example, there are hybrid schools and university model schools (generally Christian, though) that do part time at school and part time at home. There is a homeschool co-op where the children take classes together, with classes offered Tuesday and Thursday. There is Saturday school where 20 Saturdays a year the gifted children can attend Saturday mornings.<br><br>
I think once my children see how many classes they can take, they will not feel the need for full-time school. They are still preschool right now, and my oldest (almost 4) is scheduled in a group class of some sort about eight hours a week this fall.
 

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<div style="font-style:italic;">So how do you find the line between bored and overwhelmed?</div>
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It depends on your daughter. I personally never felt overwhelmed with my work. I did sometimes get frustrated when teachers just seemed to pile on busy work because it was just doing more work, not more challenging work. If your teacher is supportive, that's great. I had 2 in particular who were more interested in forcing work down my throat because they didn't like or know what to do with me. That would be my biggest point of advocacy in this situation. Make sure that she is not just given busy work. Even if she completes it (and I was such a generally compliant kid that I did), she won't be getting anything from it.<br><br>
I had some teachers who just gave me different textbooks and tailored individual lesson plans to me. I loved those classes! I learned so much more, and it worked out well. Should my children be in this situation, I will seek out other options. My parents couldn't afford private school, and there were none within an hour of us anyway, but I was very lucky to have teachers who understood their dilemma and worked with me accordingly.
 

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The question is, can they provide her with work that is at her level, or will having a big old "GIFTED" stamp on her folder just mean that they toss tons of busywork at her? It sounds as though that was all her teacher thought he could do-- offer busywork-- and he wanted to spare her that. Very thoughtful of him, really. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
Is grade skipping or perhaps subject acceleration on the table? It would provide her with more interesting work, hopefully more appropriate to her actual level, and she wouldn't just be getting more of the same stuff that's boring her in class now.
 

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Whatever the Student Intervention Team suggests, ask if you can see it in motion - if it's acceleration, sit in the class to observe the teacher and students, if it's pull-out GT, go to that, if it's extra busy-work, well, you can probably skip that! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
School meetings can be kind of stressful; it's usually lots of them and you. But this is very proactive of the school, so if it were me, I'd listen to what they suggest and then think about it. You don't have to give them an answer on the spot about anything.
 
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