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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How do I keep unpasteurized honey from going bad?<br><br>
It is currently in a glass jar with a screw-on lid. Outside of the fridge.<br><br>
Thanks!
 

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That's how I keep mine. I've never had it go bad. I don't think it would?? I bought a bunch at the last farmer's market of the year (Oct.) and still have some. It's good.<br><br>
I wouldn't put in the fridge. That will REALLY crystalize it. As I understand it, the bees keep it at a pretty constant temp in the hive (90, 95, something like that).
 

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Yup, it has natural antibiotic properties, and all that sugar, so it's not likely to go bad any time soon. And if you're not buying ahead like we did, you shouldn't have much trouble finishing it off fairly quickly. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 

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Oh, forgot something. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"><br><br>
As I understand it it is pasteurized not because of any percieved danger, but to make the honey less prone to crystalization.
 

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Well, since the honey they recently found in a Pharoah's tomb was still edible, I'm not too worried about the stuff on my counter. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br>
It will crystallize if it's sits around too long but just putting the jar in warm water will take care of that.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Pinky Tuscadero</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10797013"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Well, since the honey they recently found in a Pharoah's tomb was still edible, I'm not too worried about the stuff on my counter. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"></div>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> I hadn't heard that. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> Well then...there you go.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">It will crystallize if it's sits around too long but just putting the jar in warm water will take care of that.</td>
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I've been told, and since trying it I believe it, that if the honey is kept at a fairly constant room temp it won't crystallize. The only time the honey from last fall crystallized was when I left it near a window at night. Once I moved it back across the kitchen, the crystallizing slowed way down (which really surprised me!). Of course, this was a pretty small experiment, so ymmv.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">As I understand it it is pasteurized not because of any percieved danger, but to make the honey less prone to crystalization.</td>
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What about the whole "no honey before baby's 1st year" concept? What do you all think about that? True or false?
 

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I think that is because botulism spores are present in honey, and with baby's immature digestive system it wouldn't be a good idea to give it to them. Better safe than sorry. Especially with botulism since one can't if it is there or not and it is so deadly.<br><br>
Ami
 

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Pasteurization does not get rid of the botulism. If it did, they would say that it's OK to give pasteurized honey to babies, but they don't. They say all honey is unsafe.<br><br>
Here's some information you might find interesting.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Pasteurized Honey<br><br><span style="font-size:xx-small;">Published in Hivelights Vol 12 #3, May 1999 by Heather Clay</span><br>
Pasteurization of honey is a marketing issue not a health issue. The heating process in pasteurization extends the shelf life of honey by destroying the natural "seed" crystals that cause granulation and fermentation. Natural sugar tolerant yeasts are present in honey and they will grow if the moisture level is too high (over 18%) and storage temperature too warm. Honey is more likely to ferment after it has granulated, so to prevent both granulation and fermentation, a pasteurization process is used to kill the sugar tolerant yeasts.<br>
In the bulk honey industry where moisture levels in extracted honey are often higher than naturally ripened honey and where packers want their product to remain liquid for a long period of time, pasteurization is a necessity. The commercial equipment at packing establishments is made to heat honey quickly to 160 degrees F (71 degrees C) for four minutes and then cool it quickly through a heat exchanger. Without this equipment to heat and cool honey rapidly, the quality of the heated honey would be lower.<br><br>
Botulism spores and Pasteurized Honey<br>
Honey has a high sugar content which does not support the growth of bacteria. One of the benefits of honey is that it can be used as a bactericide and a healing agent for minor cuts, burns and intestinal upsets. Despite this fact, it is possible for Clostridium botulinum spores to exist in honey. Pasteurization or heat treatment of honey does not kill these spores. Many medical professional mistakenly associate the term pasteurization with the heat sterilization method used in the dairy and apple juice industry. Pasteurization in the honey industry is a process that kills sugar tolerant yeasts in order to extend the shelf life. The heating process is not high enough to break the tough coat of a botulism spore.<br><br>
The good news is that a recent Health Canada study of Canadian honey from various sources across the country showed no botulism spores.</td>
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<a href="http://www.honeycouncil.ca/users/folder.asp?FolderID=4844" target="_blank">Source</a>
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Fascinating. Thank you so much!<br><br>
The honey in question is delicious, local wildflower (?) honey. Poor DS has to wait 3 more months.
 

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"old" unpasteurized honey is "aged" it doesn't go bad, but the flavors will get deeper and more complex over time and the color will darken. Aged oak honey is amazing. Think of aging cheese. As it ages it becomes even easier to digest as the enzymes it break down.
 

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Your honey will only go bad if water gets in it. So make sure spoons are dry before dipping in!
 
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