Mothering Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,315 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I love crusty bread (like the Artisan bread at Costco and hard rolls at the bakery, etc.) but I don't know if I can make anything like it at my house. I did make a decent crusty French bread but it was a lot denser inside than I prefer.<br><br>
Do you need a commercial oven or convection oven to make crusty bread, or are there some secrets to making it in a regular oven?<br><br>
Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,482 Posts
Have you tried the No-Knead bread? Do a Google search -- there's also a long thread somewhere on this board about it. That is a very nice, artisanal-style bread and amazingly easy. It just takes a little planning.<br><br>
The one trick I know for "regular" homemade crusty breads is to spritz the inside of the oven with water occasionally. The steam helps to create the crispy crust. I've used a plastic spray bottle, or you can also put a shallow pan of water in the bottom of the oven.<br><br>
HTH!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
776 Posts
Another way to get a great crust is to brush the outside of the loaf with egg white. Also, letting it sit out some before eating it helps too.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,677 Posts
The steam in the oven actually helps keep the crust from forming immediately, so that the bread can rise from the heat (making it less dense) before the heat solidifies the outer layer of the bread, as well as gelatinizing the starches on the surface of the bread (which makes the crisper crust). If you're going to spray the inside of the oven, be sure to never spray the glass window, or you risk cracking it. The recommendation is actually to spray the loaf directly rather than the oven, since the water on the surface of the loaf helps the crust.<br><br>
Commercial bakeries use very high heat to bake their breads. 10 minutes at 500 then turning the oven down to 400 turns out a good crust.<br>
Don't wrap it in plastic after it's done, as that will soften the crust within minutes.<br>
Bread flour gives a better crust than all-purpose.<br>
Weighing the ingredients turns out a more consistent loaf than measuring by volume<br><br>
Cook's Illustrated did an article on "A Rustic Italian Loaf", trying to get a chewy crusty loaf in the Jan 2003 issue. I don't know whether it's on their website, but it should be. If it's not, I can type up the recipe for you, if you like. It is a rather complex recipe, and it takes 2 days to make, though.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top