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My 9 year old daughter is really struggling to memorize her times tables. I've had her write them out and she refers to them for her multiplication/division but she still can't just recall them. She does have ADHD and I don't know if this is affecting her ability to memorize this. She found the ad in our Creation magazine for "Rhymes Tables". Has anyone used this curriculum? What have you done to help your elementary children?<br><br>
Thanks!
 

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I don't know about "Rhymes Tables" but, here is a link to info about different ways to help kids learn the tables:<br><a href="http://homeschoolmath.blogspot.com/search/label/multiplication%20tables" target="_blank">http://homeschoolmath.blogspot.com/s...ation%20tables</a><br><br>
School house rock has a great one for the 3s.<br><a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mxmKRyLdBho" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mxmKRyLdBho</a><br><a href="http://www.schoolhouserock.tv/Multiplication.html" target="_blank">http://www.schoolhouserock.tv/Multiplication.html</a><br><br>
Also, and I can't find it. . .but I remember reading somewhere that you really don't need to work to hard if you can remember this:<br>
0 x whatever is 0<br>
1 x whatever is that number<br>
multiplying by 2's is skip counting<br>
mulitplying by 5's is counting by 5's<br><br>
Those are obvious, but it went on with the tricks and eventually you only had the 3s 6s and 7s to memorize but of course 3x1, 2, 5, 8, and 9 were already done. So you only had 3x3, 6 and 7 left. or something like that. If I can find the link, I will post it.<br><br>
For the nines, we know that like 9x8=72 (well, 7 is one less than the 8 and 7+2=9). This works for all of them except 9x1 and 9x0 which are fairly obvious anyways.<br><br>
Eventually though, my dd preferred to play mathmagician online<br><a href="http://resources.oswego.org/games/mathmagician/cathymath.html" target="_blank">http://resources.oswego.org/games/ma...cathymath.html</a><br><br>
Amy
 

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Thanks Amy! She has 0,1,2,5 & 10 down; it's the other numbers giving her trouble. I'm going to check out all those links and would love if you find the other link to let me know. She is very logical so having those explanations would probably help.
 

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We used this: <a href="http://www.timestales.com/" target="_blank">http://www.timestales.com/</a><br><br>
It worked very, very well for my DD.
 

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Have you seen the Waldorf-style multiplication wheels?<br><br>
I did a google image search for "waldorf multiplication wheel" and it popped up several good reference images. They are a wooden circle with nails pegged in, then you can write the numbers on the wood and the child goes around the wheel with a piece of string, skip-counting by whatever number.<br><br>
My dd is 6 and we haven't "learned" the times tables---I'm just letting her kind of figure them out through practice with multiplication until later, but I know that a kinetic method like this would help her really solidify them.<br><br>
Also----Miquon the blue book has these really cool times pattern sheets---I can't find a sample of it online! But the Blue Book has some really great practice work for multiplication . . . I wish I could explain the sheets I mean better because they are really nifty and you could totally make them yourself. If you pm me your email I could probably send you a scanned image from the Lab Annotations book to show you what I mean.
 

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lots of kids also learn them by combining it with movement. So for example, with my son who is in second grade, we will clap-snap out a rhthym, bounce a ball, stomp around the house, walk a balance beam (forward and backwards), toss bean bags, etc. If she can jump rope, that would help as well. I wouldn't worry too much though...she will get it.
 

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Honestly, I plan on doing the same thing I did as a kid--learning them with song.<br><br>
To this day, whenever I need to multiply, I hear it singing in my head.<br><br>
A few months ago, I just happened to find the *exact* album that my teacher in 3rd grade played over and over and over again for us to learn back in 1977!<br><br>
I immediately bought the MP3 versions and plan on making DD a CD, but she loves music and learns bunches of things from song.<br><br><a href="http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/happalmer31" target="_blank">http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/happalmer31</a>
 

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<span>If you go to my <a href="http://besthomeschooling.org/gateway/inted03.html" target="_blank">page of math links</a> and scroll was down, underneath the box of articles, to the M area of the alphabetical list, you'll find quite a few, about 15, links to pages or sites with fun ways to learn them. I really wouldn't stress on it or worry about it, though - they just come in time from use and from figuring things out - here's <a href="http://sandradodd.com/timestables" target="_blank">a reassuring web page on that</a>. I even have a friend with a degree in math who never memorized them. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> Lillian<br><br></span>
 

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For the 9's, hold up both hands, fingers extended, palms facing away.<br><br>
For 1x9, put down the pinkie of the left hand. 9 fingers left!<br><br>
For 2x9, put down the ring finger of the left hand. 1 finger, finger down, 8 fingers=18!<br><br>
For 3x9, put down the middle finger of the left hand (finger number 3 from the left), 2 fingers, space, 7 fingers= 27!<br><br>
Continue the pattern, and you've got all the way to 9x9 on your own fingers. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
(If I was able to explain that with any clarity whatsoever...)
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>*Lisa*</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15376123"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">We used this: <a href="http://www.timestales.com/" target="_blank">http://www.timestales.com/</a><br><br>
It worked very, very well for my DD.</div>
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OMG this is the BEST thing we've ever used. My son (also 9) learned and memorized the whole times tables in LESS THAN A WEEK. We did Part 1 in one day then practiced for 2 more days. Then Part 2 in one day and a few days practice.<br><br>
I love it because it focuses on the harder tables (3,4,6,7,8,9). It's weird, it's different, it looks like it'll never work, then...it just does. I don't know who was more shocked - me or ds.<br><br>
It is now a few months later and he still remembers it all.
 

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what about <a href="http://multiplication.com/" target="_blank">http://multiplication.com/</a> my son loves it <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> they use stories that rhyme like:<br><br>
Shoe (2) X Shoe (2) = Door 4<br><br>
Tree (3) X Door (4) = Elf 12
 
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