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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm probably worrying a little too far in advance about this (I'm only about 14.5 wks), but the women in my family are notoriously "late" birthers. One uncle in particular was 6 wks late, and the way I understand it, most of my 12 aunts and uncles were "late." I was 6 wks late and ultimately a c-sec, I guess because I "wouldn't drop". My brother was a scheduled c-sec because Mom wasn't any more dialated with him than she had been at the same point with me, and they figured it would end the same way. (FWIW, the afore mentioned uncle was 16 lbs. I kid you not. It's the stuff of nightmares. I was 8 lbs 10 oz., my brother was 7 or 8 lbs as well.)

When Mom was preg. with me, she had a resident helping out her dr. When I was 3 wks over due, the res. wanted to induce. Her dr. said, "I know it's not going to do any good, but it won't do any harm either, so we're going to let him try." And it didn't do any good. I think she was there most of the day and dialated 1 cm.

SO....anyway, I have a feeling I'm going to be late as well. And I know that anymore they don't want you to go more than a wk overdue (a friend was outraged that they let her go 10 days before they induced).

How long can you go over? Is there, I don't know, a limit? I guess I always thought the baby would know when it was ready to come out. I mean, that's how it used to work back in the "old days," isn't it? How do "they" decide how long is too long?

And, not that it matters, but I really want to avoid a c-sec, for many reasons.

I always end up making my posts way longer than I intended!
 

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Depends on the care provider. I usually hear 42 weeks as the outsid elimit, but as far as I know it's not uncommon to go longer. If you're concerned, talk to your midwife or doc or whoever oyu are using and see what they prefer. You might decide to find someone else depending onthe answer, or prepare to stand oyur ground if it comes to it.

I delivered the day befor emy 42 week appointment. The doc on call says 'good to see you! glad you went into labor naturally, you would have been induced tomorrow'
I said 'no, I wouldn't have let you do that'

He was not the person I was seeing, but happened to be on call for the group. My regular doctor(a family practitioner) probably would have made a very half-hearted attempt at telling me the rules say he has to recommend it, but I'm confident he would have accepted my decision. He had gotten to know us by then and knew we were well-researched and thoughtful about our decisions, he never gave us any crap about doing htings differently. Told us what the party line was, heard what our decision was, and always told us what good parents we were.

I think the most important thing is to find someone you trust who is on the same page as you, or near enough for your comfort.
 

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I would never agree to ANY sort of induction without medical reason before 42 weeks. I MIGHT consider it at 43 or 44 weeks. Maybe.

Perhaps women in your family run longer cycles?

-Angela
 

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With dd, I went 44 weeks, no labor. And yes, the dates were correct. She ended up beign a footling, no labor whatsoever-tried EVERYTHING. She ended up a c-section, with some post maturity signs. Not a huge deal, but she was ripe .

IME, good midwives and care giver's start to worry after 42 weeks, not at 40 or 38. And a really good provider will start to get seriously worried only after 43 weeks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by Leilalu
With dd, I went 44 weeks, no labor. And yes, the dates were correct. She ended up beign a footling, no labor whatsoever-tried EVERYTHING. She ended up a c-section, with some post maturity signs. Not a huge deal, but she was ripe .

IME, good midwives and care giver's start to worry after 42 weeks, not at 40 or 38. And a really good provider will start to get seriously worried only after 43 weeks.

What are post maturity signs?

How about, worst case senario, what happens if I/the dr./midwife/whoever lets me go too far overdue?
 

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One of my pregnancies was 48 weeks long. And I knew the exact date of conception because no sex before nor afterwards, more than a year on both sides.

At the time, my life was awful and I was extremely streesed/overwhelmed, etc. so even though I had been having contractions every 3 minutes, I let them give me pitocin, and, of course, ended with a c-sec.

In hindsight, I would have been better off staying home.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by OldFashionedGirl
What are post maturity signs?

How about, worst case senario, what happens if I/the dr./midwife/whoever lets me go too far overdue?
Post maturity includes things like dry skin and long fingernails, I'm sure someone has a more complete list though.

There is no magic switch that renders your placenta useless.

-Angela
 

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I'm 41 weeks, 1 day today and went in for a non-stress test (looking for variability in heart rate) and AFI (amniotic fluid index). After 42 weeks the birth has to be in the hospital, but hear my midwives are very laid back about waiting past that point and won't 'force' and induction on you.

I am planning a homebirth and really want that to happen. well, one of the midwives said "there's a lot of hours between now and then", but it very well be one of the longest weeks!

Good luck and enjoy your pregnancy, I still am
 

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I *highly* recommend finding a homebirth midwife, as I doubt any OB or CNM in a hospital will be happy with you going past 42 weeks. That doesn't mean you have to let them induce you, but it means you'd get LOTS of pressure to induce, and when you're 10 months pregnant, it's probably alot easier to give in to such pressure, since you're ready for it to be over with.


Going longer than 40 weeks definitely can run in families. My midwife, her mother, and her grandmother all were 43 week mamas. That's the norm for them.

Now since your mom had 46 weekers that were only in the 8-9 lb range, I'd guess that either a) her dates were wrong (long cycles, as a PP mentioned - back then they would have probably gone strictly by LMP, which can date you farther ahead than you really are), or b) her babies just needed that long to cook! If she'd been induced at 42 weeks with you, there's a chance you would have been a preemie!

Anyway, I'd make sure this is part of your interview process when looking at midwives - find one that will be ok with going 42+ weeks, given your family history. Make sure you mention the family history!
 

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I went 43 weeks with my last dd. Mw because of state laws was going to have to start doing whatever state law says.

We bought time by not being sure of our dates
:
 

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With my first daughter, I saw a pretty mainstream OB who said that they'd "let" me go to 42 weeks since I was a first time mom. I wouldn't get induced before then anyways! I don't know what I'd do after that.
 

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The average first time mom is 8 days "late." I went 11 days over due with my DD. My midwives were letting me go 14 days past my u/s indicated due date which was about 43.5 weeks if you went by dates. At the time I was a little frustrated and had trouble remember why I *didn't* want to be induced! FWIW, my mom also went about 4 weeks late with my sister and brother but they were average sized babies (about 7.5 lbs.) and she is pretty sure her dates were wrong. I would definitly ask your care provider what their "rule" is. I don't get this one week thing, it's nuts to induce BEFORE the average first time mom would have birthed! The risk, if I have it right, is that the incidence of unexplained stillbirth rises after 42 weeks.
 

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http://www.gentlebirth.org/archives/datesppr.html

That might help.

I went to 42 weeks+ with all mine. The last one we weren't sure of dates because I had no pp af and refused the u/s. I always face the hb transfer at 42 weeks and wanted to avoid that so we padded my edd. We decided the day I got my bfp was 4 weeks and counted from there. But I knew I was a mos further along (felt movement at 12 weeks, heard fht with a fetascope at 16 weeks, measured huge...etc). So offcially I was 38 weeks 6 days but really I know I was more like 43 weeks. He is the only one who looked post mature. He was very dry, looked well done. I always have calcified placentas, but they are also very big. I think they keep growing the longer they are in there and the older parts calcify. I had only 1 baby with vernix all the others had none, but they didn't have meconium either.

Ultimatly, I say listen to your body/baby. Knowing what I know about my body I couldn't consent to an induction passed soley on dates. I am expecting again and gonna pad my edd again. I really liked doing that. Stress free. No nagging phone calls from ils everyday. No funny looks when people ask when you are due. (even if I knew it wasn't really my edd)
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by alegna
Post maturity includes things like dry skin and long fingernails, I'm sure someone has a more complete list though.

There is no magic switch that renders your placenta useless.

-Angela
yep. And alot of times I think alot of the vernix has soaked in I think?Can't remember exactly.

I highly doubt that your midwife or doctor will let you go to far overdue.
It's kind of the opposite problem usually.
Another concern would be the baby not having enough room or fluids.
 

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My family doesn't have a history of long pregnancies or inductions so I think at 42 weeks I'd want to have the baby's position checked. At 44 weeks I'd actually want some sort of diagnosis that things were still cool in there. I've read that the problems they've found with very postdates babies come from things that can be monitored. I'd have to do some research on that and figure out how invasive I was willing to go on the tests. Might actually have a U/S for that one, but only if there weren't other alternatives.

With a family history of long pregnancies, I probably wouldn't bother doing anything until 43 or 44 weeks.
 

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FWIW, my mom went 43 1/2 weeks with me and 42+ weeks with each of my three siblings. I was SURE I was going to go well past 40 weeks. Then I went into labor at 37w 4d
I'd try and keep a positive attitude, do your research, and try and enjoy your pg without worrying about going post-date.
 

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I went into labor at 42 weeks with my first, and my second labor started at 43 weeks. I was positive about dates both times. Both my babies were covered with vernix...so I know they weren't "late." Mine just need a little extra time to cook, I guess. This time I've added 12 or so days to my due date just to avoid the phone calls at the end.

FWIW, those last weeks of pregnancy are my favorite! Love the huge belly, the excitement, and I think I get a touch of melancholy that it will really be over soon.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by alegna
There is no magic switch that renders your placenta useless.
Uh, yes there is. The placenta gets old and starts to calcify, rendering it useless.

I'm not sure what the overdue time limit is, but there IS one (it depends on the woman). The placenta only works for so long. My mother went 5-6 weeks overdue with me (due to a miscalculation on her due date thanks to the doctor, so they thought she was only 2weeks overdue).

When I was born, the placenta was white (calcified) and rotten/old. They told her that had I been in there one more day longer, I would have died.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Star

When I was born, the placenta was white (calcified) and rotten/old. They told her that had I been in there one more day longer, I would have died.
I believe they still work even if calcified.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by arlecchina
I believe they still work even if calcified.
I'm not an expert, but from what I can tell on google; a calcified placenta is a sign of aging. The more it ages, the more it decreases oxygen and nutrients to the baby.
 
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