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We're looking at a great house in a neighborhood that seems very nice. It's in a development that's about 10-12 years-old, though, so many of the families have kids that around 10. We've done just a couple drive throughs and have seen groups of kids around 5-7 but haven't seen any preschoolers yet. We're going to ask neighbors today about this, but I'm wondering what people think about the importance of having lots of other same age kids around them.<br>
My son is really social and would love it. I guess it could be really great or it could be a hassle.<br>
He'll be going to preschool 5 mornings a week so it's not like he won't get social interaction.<br>
Everything else about the house and neighborhood seem really good.<br>
My conflict is because there is another newer development with supposedly more young families that is a ways away. I don't know how many more young families as these are all just generalizations that I hear. This development is nice but potentially more expensive and would take a long time to find a nice house in due to cost and competition.<br>
So how important is it to have lots of age-mates around? Is it a big deal? as long as there are kids (even if they're a couple years older), is this still good?<br>
Anyone have any opinions? this would be our first home so maybe the gravity of it is affecting me more.
 

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For us, it did make a difference, at least in the beginning. Our old house had kids everywhere, the whole neighborhood was families with kids and day 1 the kids were outside playing. We moved in August to a neighborhood that has mostly old people and a couple young couples with babies and NO ONE is ever outside. It's creepy. So the kids were less inclined to play outside. After a few months they made friends though, and now we have people over to play, but it's just not as spontaneous as it seemed to be before. Just my experience.
 

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You just have to work harder to seek out playmates. Out of the three houses we've had since DD1 was born, only one has had neighborhood children of similar age. Our last house we bought, and the one we will be in for a very long time with the market now, <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eyesroll.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="roll"> has NO neighborhood children. It is really quite strange, it's a very active subdivision, but all the people on our street has either been here for years and have grown children, or they are working professionals with no children. We love the area, but the dream of walking to the park and running into small packs of children doesn't happen. We tend to drive to a city park to play for that reason, and seek out playmates in other places. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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We moved from a neighborhood with several same=age playmates and other SAHMs to one with basically no other kids to play with. It has made a huge difference for us. We are due to move again and one of our top house criteria is that the neighborhood have lots of kids the same age as ours.
 

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We live in a neighborhood without other children around to play with and we manage okay. My kids have friends from other activities like school and ballet class. Still... I wish we did have a more family-friendly neighborhood.
 

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I suppose it depends on what you would make of the opportunity. We live right next to a playground, and a lot of small kids around. So when my DS is maybe 5, he will be able to just walk over to a kids house to play. Right now he is only 3.5, and DD is only 1, so I am with him, but he can play outside by himself sometimes, and I would like it when his little girlfriend can just call on him in the afternoons. I WON'T MOVE now. So I think it is really important. I supposed you get used to whatever situation you are in, so if you are not in an area with lots of kids, then maybe you could have more arranged type of activities (soccer, art class....) for your DCs?
 

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We're in a neighborhood with mostly empty-nesters or children 8 and up. At times it would be nice to have younger children close by so there isn't so much planning for play dates but at times it's nice that it's pretty quiet. We have a big backyard and parks close by so we do ok. My 5 yr old also has a lot of play dates from pre school. We knew this when we moved in, but we couldn't pass up the house, esp the deal we got on it, the yard, or the neighborhood.<br><br>
A friend of ours has a neighborhood full of kids and there is always someone at her house. She likes it most of the time, but also feels that they don't really get to do anything with just their kids outside because there is always a neighbor coming over to play. Of course she can say 'no' but then they end up with hurt feelings.<br><br>
The grass is always greener.....
 

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I just wanted to add that when we did live where there was neighborhood kids, it was a blessing and a curse. It was nice to walk outside have spur of the moment playtime, but on the other hand, there always where DC around. That made it rough when I didn't want packs of kids in my house or backyard, when I had stuff to do and couldn't supervise, when I didn't want to feed extra children or want them feeding junk to DD1, there where many times I found myself running around and closing the blinds/curtains so DD1 wouldn't see there where children outside. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="innocent"> It made getting places on time difficult in the summer because we'd walk outside, she would see kids and want to play, except we had someplace to be in 15 minutes, hence the reason I'd close the blinds if we had plans trying to avoid that.<br><br>
There are good and bad things about both, now that I'm writing all this out, I find myself really liking not having so many neighborhood DC around. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="innocent"> Other poster mentioned how quiet her street is, and mine is well, my house is definitely the nosy one, and I ok with that. I love the sound of children playing, but when you are trying to put a baby to sleep or being pg and really needing a nap, but the next door neighbors just got a slip and slide so there is nothing resembling quietness to be found..... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngtongue.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Stick Out Tongue">
 

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Even if there are other preschoolers, you can't guarantee that you'll like the families or they'd be a good fit with your child(ren).<br><br>
You can't guarantee that the families won't move in a year or two.<br><br>
I would buy a house in a neighborhood that makes sense for a lot of other things, and if there are kids, great! If not, oh well.
 

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I will have to agree that you never know how you are going to like the neighbors. Our block is filled with similar age kids. Some of them I feel really lucky to live next to; and others drive me nuts!!!
 

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I love living in a neighborhood with lots of kids my daughter's age. She plays outside from sunup to sundown on warm days.
 

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I don't think it is very important to base where you're going to live on the age of the children living there at the current time. We've lived here for 10 years. When we moved in here we were the youngest people on the block by about 30 years. Our kids are 5, 7, & 9 & they are the older kids on the block as younger families have moved in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>CarrieMF</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10790039"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I don't think it is very important to base where you're going to live on the age of the children living there at the current time. We've lived here for 10 years. When we moved in here we were the youngest people on the block by about 30 years. Our kids are 5, 7, & 9 & they are the older kids on the block as younger families have moved in.</div>
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This is true. Many people have made a lot of good points. And really, we have evolved into a playdate culture anyway.<br>
Having some control over my child's friends would be a bonus, too. Bad neighbors can make your life hell.<br>
And lastly, you have to feel good in the house you buy. The house we're buying is perfect for us and we'll feel really good in it. So I think my dilemma is solved. Thank! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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Playmates are really important but there is no guarantee that moving to a different area is going to mean more playmates even if there are more children in that age group. In the neighborhood I am in there are a lot of SAHMs and a lot of kids my dd's age, but they only get to play by appointment when their parents feel like having company and very rarely do they even do that. There are a lot of kids in the parks at certain times but even that is hit and miss especially if it just looks like rain, which it does a lot here. If he is going to preschool then pick the area you like the most unless you get a lot of firm commitments from the neighbors that their kids will be available for a lot of playing on a very frequent basis.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>LynnS6</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10782489"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Even if there are other preschoolers, you can't guarantee that you'll like the families or they'd be a good fit with your child(ren).<br><br>
You can't guarantee that the families won't move in a year or two.<br><br>
I would buy a house in a neighborhood that makes sense for a lot of other things, and if there are kids, great! If not, oh well.</div>
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I totally agree with this!
 

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Based on your description I would run screaming in the other direction. I absolutley despise developments of any kind. But I fully admit that is *my* hangup! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngtongue.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Stick Out Tongue"><br><br>
We live in a 250+ year old farm house that abuts a state park, we have a pond across the street and lots of grassy area's to play in. We have one "neighbor" to speak of but we have to cut thru a field behind our barn to go visit. They have 2 kids and its nice but they weren't there when we bought our house so it was not a deciding factor at all. To us it was more important to be surrounded by nature then people. It is still easy for my son to socialize, it just takes a little more planning.
 
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