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<p>I don't know where to find the legal information regarding this. I'm in CA and I thought the law was that a midwife must be licensed/practicing for one year before taking a student apprentice...but then I heard through the grapevine that it must be 3 years...I can't find this specific on the CA Medical Board website or on California Association of Midwives website. Does anyone know? Or know where I can look?</p>
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<p>Which of course brought out my curiosity full bore and I also want to know the legalities of other states regarding this. I personally would want more experience than that, and I've no idea when I'll be ready for students myself. I'm no where near licensed yet...but it's good to know right? If you can't tell me about California...please tell me about the state you live in as well as what your own comfort level would be/or is. </p>
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<p>Thanks ladies!</p>
 

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<p>I don't know if this is something that is legally governed, but rather but the school/program that the student midwife is attending.  I am in California but attended a distance CNM program in Kentucky (Frontier).  Frontier's requirement was that anyone precepting for their program had to be in practice for at least a year.  I just took on my first student midwife after practicing for about a year and a half - I certainly did not feel ready any sooner than that but so far it's been a great experience!</p>
 

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<p>NARM just changed their policies for preceptors. Preceptors must now be CPMs for 3 years or have an additional 50 births besides what they required for certification before they can sign off for an apprentice or they must complete a form requesting permission. So, maybe what you have been hearing about is the NARM policy rather than a California law?</p>
 

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<p>Went to NARM and found that! Yes-you are both right. It is the individual school, but also NARMS new requirement. Thanks so much! Still learning the logistics to it all...and where to find information at. My bookmarks are almost exploding ;)</p>
 

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<p>I'm pretty sure I'd take on a student prior to being in practice 3 years.  Mind you, I've been a student <em>forever</em>, and actually having my own practice is still a few years away, so take that FWIW!</p>
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<p>But if she was trained in CPR,NRP, could chart, knew comfort measures, had a grasp of the basics, and was okay with me not being able to sign off births for her, I'd be happy to have the help, and certainly she'd be learning even if she couldn't count the births for NARM.</p>
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<p>Kat </p>
 

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<p>I totally agree with you Kat.  Someone else had said that teaching reinforces your own knowledge and I have found this to be true.  It has also made me more vigilant about getting my handouts completed, tweaking my waivers and protocols, etc. especially since my preceptors didn't do any of that.  ;)</p>
 
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